robbery


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

rob·ber·y

 (rŏb′ə-rē)
n. pl. rob·ber·ies
The act or an instance of unlawfully taking the property of another by the use of violence or intimidation.

robbery

(ˈrɒbərɪ)
n, pl -beries
1. (Law) criminal law the stealing of property from a person by using or threatening to use force
2. the act or an instance of robbing

rob•ber•y

(ˈrɒb ə ri)

n., pl. -ber•ies.
1. the act or practice of robbing.
2. the felonious taking of property from another's person by violence or intimidation.
[1150–1200; Middle English robberie < Old French. See rob, -ery]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.robbery - larceny by threat of violencerobbery - larceny by threat of violence  
larceny, stealing, theft, thievery, thieving - the act of taking something from someone unlawfully; "the thieving is awful at Kennedy International"
armed robbery, holdup, stickup, heist - robbery at gunpoint
caper, job - a crime (especially a robbery); "the gang pulled off a bank job in St. Louis"
dacoity, dakoity - robbery by a gang of armed dacoits
heist, rip-off - the act of stealing
highjacking, hijacking - robbery of a traveller or vehicle in transit or seizing control of a vehicle by the use of force
highway robbery - robbery of travellers on or near a public road
rolling - the act of robbing a helpless person; "he was charged with rolling drunks in the park"
2.robbery - plundering during riots or in wartimerobbery - plundering during riots or in wartime
pillaging, plundering, pillage - the act of stealing valuable things from a place; "the plundering of the Parthenon"; "his plundering of the great authors"

robbery

noun
1. burglary, raid, hold-up, rip-off (slang), stick-up (slang, chiefly U.S.) He committed dozens of armed robberies.
2. theft, stealing, fraud, steaming (informal), mugging (informal), plunder, swindle, pillage, embezzlement, larceny, depredation, filching, thievery, rapine, spoliation He was serving a sentence for robbery.

robbery

noun
The act or crime of taking another's property unlawfully and by force:
Slang: heist, stickup.
Translations
سَطْولُصوصِيَّه، سَرِقَه، نَهْب
krádežloupež
røveri
ryöstö
pljačka
rablás
rán
強盗
강도질
lúpež
rop
rån
การปล้น
sự cướp đoạt

robbery

[ˈrɒbərɪ] Nrobo m
robbery with violence (Jur) → robo m a mano armada, atraco m, asalto m
it's daylight robbery!¡es una estafa!, ¡es un robo a mano armada!

robbery

[ˈrɒbəri] nvol m
armed robbery → vol à main armée
a bank robbery → un hold-up

robbery

nRaub m no pl; (= burglary)Einbruch m (→ of in +acc); robbery with violence (Jur) → Raubüberfall m; armed robberybewaffneter Raubüberfall; at that price it’s sheer robbery! (inf)das ist der reinste Nepp (inf), → das ist reiner Wucher (inf); the bank robberyder Überfall auf die Bank

robbery

[ˈrɒbərɪ] nfurto; (armed robbery) → rapina
robbery with violence (Law) → furto con aggressione
it's daylight robbery! (fam) → (ma) è una rapina!

rob

(rob) past tense, past participle robbed verb
1. to steal from (a person, place etc). He robbed a bank / an old lady; I've been robbed!
2. (with of) to take (something) away from; to deprive of. An accident robbed him of his sight at the age of 21.
ˈrobber noun
The bank robbers got away with nearly $50,000.
ˈrobberyplural ˈrobberies noun
the act of robbing. Robbery is a serious crime; He was charged with four robberies.

to rob a bank or a person; to steal a watch, pencil, money etc.

robbery

سَطْو krádež røveri Raub κλοπή atraco ryöstö vol pljačka rapina 強盗 강도질 diefstal ran rozbój roubo ограбление rån การปล้น soygun sự cướp đoạt 抢掠
References in classic literature ?
Individuals from either party interfered; the one side to prevent and the other to aid in the robbery.
His desk and private drawers, in a room contiguous to his bedchamber, had been ransacked; money and valuable articles were missing; there was a bloody hand-print on the old man's linen; and, by a powerfully welded chain of deductive evidence, the guilt of the robbery and apparent murder had been fixed on Clifford, then residing with his uncle in the House of the Seven Gables.
Ah, yes, to be sure, the other answered, that too was robbery.
But when the friction comes to have its machine, and oppression and robbery are organized, I say, let us not have such a machine any longer.
If the motive had been robbery, the girl might answer; but there wasn't any girl that would want to take this old man's life for revenge.
Here we have religion and robbery the allies of each other --devils dressed in angels' robes, and hell presenting the semblance of paradise.
I heard that the table beer was a robbery of parents, and the pudding an imposition.
But not only was there no Constable there, but no discovery had yet been made of the robbery.
Silas now told his story, under frequent questioning as the mysterious character of the robbery became evident.
I shall hear, I guess, that my property has been swept off to save from starving the hungry banditti, whom they cannot support but by theft and robbery.
Some were undone by lawsuits; others spent all they had in drinking, whoring, and gaming; others fled for treason; many for murder, theft, poisoning, robbery, perjury, forgery, coining false money, for committing rapes, or sodomy; for flying from their colours, or deserting to the enemy; and most of them had broken prison; none of these durst return to their native countries, for fear of being hanged, or of starving in a jail; and therefore they were under the necessity of seeking a livelihood in other places.
It was the advice of some of them to throw us all into the sea wrapped up in a sail; for their purpose was to trade at some of the ports of Spain, giving themselves out as Bretons, and if they brought us alive they would be punished as soon as the robbery was discovered; but the captain (who was the one who had plundered my beloved Zoraida) said he was satisfied with the prize he had got, and that he would not touch at any Spanish port, but pass the Straits of Gibraltar by night, or as best he could, and make for La Rochelle, from which he had sailed.