robustious


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ro·bus·tious

 (rō-bŭs′chəs)
adj.
1. Vigorous or energetic, especially in a rough or noisy way: a robustious group of teenagers.
2. Coarse or crude: a robustious comedy.


ro·bus′tious·ly adv.

robustious

(rəʊˈbʌstʃəs)
adj
1. rough; boisterous
2. strong, robust, or stout
roˈbustiously adv
roˈbustiousness n

ro•bus•tious

(roʊˈbʌs tʃəs)

adj.
1. rough, rude, or boisterous.
2. robust, strong, or stout.
[1540–50]
ro•bus′tious•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.robustious - noisy and lacking in restraint or disciplinerobustious - noisy and lacking in restraint or discipline; "a boisterous crowd"; "a social gathering that became rambunctious and out of hand"; "a robustious group of teenagers"; "beneath the rumbustious surface of his paintings is sympathy for the vulnerability of ordinary human beings"; "an unruly class"
disorderly - undisciplined and unruly; "disorderly youths"; "disorderly conduct"
References in periodicals archive ?
It's only fitting that Hamlet, probably the modern method actor's most coveted role, should draw a firm distinction between "a robustious, periwig-pated fellow" who would "tear [a] passage to tatters, to very rags, to please the groundlings, who for the most part are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb shows and noise" and a model actor like the Player King who strives "to acquire and beget a temperance that may give it smoothness" (3.
He instructs the Players to aim high, even if that means losing most of their audience: "O, it offends me to the soul to hear a robustious periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings, who for the most part are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb-shows and noise" (3.
Garfield, according to his rather robustious web site, is mainly a prolific American writer of crime and mystery fiction whose considerable success hinges on his insistence on entertaining the reader.