rogue


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rogue

 (rōg)
n.
1. An unprincipled, deceitful, and unreliable person; a scoundrel or rascal.
2. One who is playfully mischievous; a scamp.
3. A wandering beggar; a vagrant.
4. A vicious and solitary animal, especially an elephant that has separated itself from its herd.
5. An organism, especially a plant, that shows an undesirable variation from a standard.
adj.
1. Vicious and solitary. Used of an animal, especially an elephant.
2. Large, destructive, and anomalous or unpredictable: rogue tornado.
3. Operating outside normal or desirable controls: "How could a single rogue trader bring down an otherwise profitable and well-regarded institution?" (Saul Hansell).
v. rogued, rogu·ing, rogues
v.tr.
To remove (diseased or abnormal specimens) from a group of plants of the same variety.
v.intr.
To remove diseased or abnormal plants.

[Origin unknown.]

rogue

(rəʊɡ)
n
1. a dishonest or unprincipled person, esp a man; rascal; scoundrel
2. often jocular a mischievous or wayward person, often a child; scamp
3. (Agriculture) a crop plant which is inferior, diseased, or of a different, unwanted variety
4.
a. any inferior or defective specimen
b. (as modifier): rogue heroin.
5. archaic a vagrant
6. (Zoology)
a. an animal of vicious character that has separated from the main herd and leads a solitary life
b. (as modifier): a rogue elephant.
vb
(Agriculture)
a. (tr) to rid (a field or crop) of plants that are inferior, diseased, or of an unwanted variety
b. to identify and remove such plants
[C16: of unknown origin; perhaps related to Latin rogāre to beg]

rogue

(roʊg)

n., v. rogued, ro•guing. n.
1. a dishonest person; scoundrel.
2. a playfully mischievous person; scamp.
3. a tramp or vagabond.
4. a rogue elephant or other animal.
5. a usu. inferior organism, esp. a plant, varying markedly from the normal.
v.i.
6. to live or act as a rogue.
v.t.
7. to uproot or destroy (plants, etc., that do not conform to a desired standard).
8. to perform this operation upon: to rogue a field.
[1555–65; earlier also roge, roag, perhaps akin to rogation or Latin rogāre to ask]
syn: See knave.

rogue


Past participle: rogued
Gerund: roguing

Imperative
rogue
rogue
Present
I rogue
you rogue
he/she/it rogues
we rogue
you rogue
they rogue
Preterite
I rogued
you rogued
he/she/it rogued
we rogued
you rogued
they rogued
Present Continuous
I am roguing
you are roguing
he/she/it is roguing
we are roguing
you are roguing
they are roguing
Present Perfect
I have rogued
you have rogued
he/she/it has rogued
we have rogued
you have rogued
they have rogued
Past Continuous
I was roguing
you were roguing
he/she/it was roguing
we were roguing
you were roguing
they were roguing
Past Perfect
I had rogued
you had rogued
he/she/it had rogued
we had rogued
you had rogued
they had rogued
Future
I will rogue
you will rogue
he/she/it will rogue
we will rogue
you will rogue
they will rogue
Future Perfect
I will have rogued
you will have rogued
he/she/it will have rogued
we will have rogued
you will have rogued
they will have rogued
Future Continuous
I will be roguing
you will be roguing
he/she/it will be roguing
we will be roguing
you will be roguing
they will be roguing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been roguing
you have been roguing
he/she/it has been roguing
we have been roguing
you have been roguing
they have been roguing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been roguing
you will have been roguing
he/she/it will have been roguing
we will have been roguing
you will have been roguing
they will have been roguing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been roguing
you had been roguing
he/she/it had been roguing
we had been roguing
you had been roguing
they had been roguing
Conditional
I would rogue
you would rogue
he/she/it would rogue
we would rogue
you would rogue
they would rogue
Past Conditional
I would have rogued
you would have rogued
he/she/it would have rogued
we would have rogued
you would have rogued
they would have rogued
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rogue - a deceitful and unreliable scoundrelrogue - a deceitful and unreliable scoundrel
scoundrel, villain - a wicked or evil person; someone who does evil deliberately

rogue

noun
1. scoundrel, crook (informal), villain, fraudster, sharper, fraud, cheat, devil, deceiver, charlatan, con man (informal), swindler, knave (archaic), ne'er-do-well, reprobate, scumbag (slang), blackguard, mountebank, grifter (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), skelm (S. African) He wasn't a rogue at all.
2. scamp, rascal, scally (Northwest English dialect), rapscallion a loveable rogue

rogue

noun
One who causes minor trouble or damage:
Informal: cutup.
Translations
ماكِر، مُحْتالوَغْد
darebák-iceuličník
gavtyvgavtyveagtig
gazfickó
òrjóturprakkari
nenaudėlisniekšas
blēdisnelietispalaidnis
afacandalaverecidüzenbazmaskara

rogue

[rəʊg]
A. N
1. (= thief etc) → pícaro/a m/f, pillo/a m/f (hum) → granuja mf
you rogue!¡canalla!
B. ADJ
1. (Zool) [lion, male] → solitario, apartado de la manada
rogue elephantelefante m solitario (y peligroso)
2. (Bio, Med) [gene] → defectuoso
3. (= maverick) [person] → que va por libre, inconformista; [company] → sin escrúpulos
rogue cop (= criminal) → policía mf corrupto/a
C. CPD rogue's gallery Nfichero m de delincuentes

rogue

[ˈrəʊg]
n
(= unscrupulous person) → fripouille f
(= mischievous person) → fripouille f
modif
[elephant] → solitaire
[gene] → aberrant(e)
(= maverick) [government] → voyou; [cop] → solitaire rogue state, rogue traderrogue state nÉtat m hors-la-loi, État m voyourogue trader nopérateur m sans scrupules

rogue

n
(= scoundrel)Gauner(in) m(f), → Schurke m; (= scamp)Schlingel m; you little rogue!du kleiner Gauner!
(Zool) → Einzelgänger(in) m(f)
adj
(Zool) a rogue maleein Einzelgänger m; rogue elephantEinzelgänger(elefant) m
(= maverick) personeinzelgängerisch; (= criminal) person, organizationverbrecherisch, skrupellos
(= abnormal, aberrant)abnormal, entartet; (Biol, Med) cellaberrant, entartet; satellite, rocketfehlgeleitet; a rogue firework flew into the crowdein fehlgezündeter Feuerwerkskörper flog in die Menge

rogue

[rəʊg]
1. nmascalzone m
rogues' gallery → foto fpl di pregiudicati
2. adj (elephant) → solitario/a

rogue

(rəug) noun
1. a dishonest person. I wouldn't buy a car from a rogue like him.
2. a mischievous person, especially a child. She's a little rogue sometimes.
References in classic literature ?
There, you rogue, mind how you behave yourself, or we shall get into trouble.
The little rogue thought I had not seen her, and, drawing back, she took her former station by the window, quite demurely.
I'm forgetting my ready-made relations -- my half-witted aunt, and my uncle the rogue.
And I couldn't be a match for the rogues, without being a match for you, who are the blackest-looking and the worst rogue between this and France.
We must have you whipt; you are at least as much rogue as fool.
Or a rogue," said Agatha, emphasizing the suggestion by a glitter of her eyes and teeth, whilst her schoolfellows, rather disapproving of her freedom, stood stiffly dumb.
You may imagine how I felt when I heard this abominable old rogue addressing another in the very same words of flattery as he had used to myself.
However, an unlucky school-boy aimed a hazel nut directly at my head, which very narrowly missed me; otherwise it came with so much violence, that it would have infallibly knocked out my brains, for it was almost as large as a small pumpkin, but I had the satisfaction to see the young rogue well beaten, and turned out of the room.
Mine is not that," said Sancho; "I mean he has nothing of the rogue in him; on the contrary, he has the soul of a pitcher; he has no thought of doing harm to anyone, only good to all, nor has he any malice whatever in him; a child might persuade him that it is night at noonday; and for this simplicity I love him as the core of my heart, and I can't bring myself to leave him, let him do ever such foolish things.
This effect is produced when the clever rogue, like Sisyphus, is outwitted, or the brave villain defeated.
Our "romantic" is a man of great breadth and the greatest rogue of all our rogues, I assure you.
This unexpected liberality, which made it nearly as profitable and infinitely less hazardous for Rose to remain honest than to play the rogue, completely disarmed him.