rolling


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roll

 (rōl)
v. rolled, roll·ing, rolls
v.intr.
1. To move forward along a surface by revolving on an axis or by repeatedly turning over.
2. To travel or be moved on wheels or rollers: rolled down the sidewalk on their scooters.
3. To travel around; wander: roll from town to town.
4.
a. To travel or be carried in a vehicle.
b. To be carried on a stream: The logs rolled down the cascading river.
5.
a. To start to move or operate: The press wouldn't roll.
b. To work or succeed in a sustained way; gain momentum: The political campaign finally began to roll.
6. To go by; elapse: The days rolled along.
7. To recur. Often used with around: Summer has rolled around again.
8. To move in a periodic revolution, as a planet in its orbit.
9. To turn over and over: The puppy rolled in the mud.
10. To shift the gaze usually quickly and continually: The child's eyes rolled with fright.
11. To turn around or revolve on an axis.
12. To move or advance with a rising and falling motion; undulate: The waves rolled toward shore.
13. To extend or appear to extend in gentle rises and falls: The dunes roll to the sea.
14. To move or rock from side to side: The ship pitched and rolled in heavy seas.
15. To walk with a swaying, unsteady motion.
16. Slang To experience periodic rushes after taking an intoxicating drug, especially MDMA.
17. To take the shape of a ball or cylinder: Yarn rolls easily.
18. To become flattened by pressure applied by a roller.
19. To make a deep, prolonged, surging sound: Thunder rolled in the distance.
20. To make a sustained trilling sound, as certain birds do.
21. To beat a drum in a continuous series of short blows.
22. To pour, flow, or move in a continual stream: tourists rolling into the city.
23. To enjoy ample amounts: rolled in the money.
v.tr.
1. To cause to move forward along a surface by revolving on an axis or by repeatedly turning over.
2. To move or push along on wheels or rollers: rolled the plane out of the hangar.
3. To impel or send onward in a steady, swelling motion: The sea rolls its waves onto the sand.
4. To impart a swaying, rocking motion to: Heavy seas rolled the ship.
5. To turn around or partly turn around; rotate: rolled his head toward the door.
6. To cause to begin moving or operating: roll the cameras; roll the presses.
7. To extend or lay out: rolled out a long rope.
8. To pronounce or utter with a trill: You must roll your r's in Spanish.
9. To utter or emit in full, swelling tones.
10. To beat (a drum) with a continuous series of short blows.
11. To wrap (something) round and round upon itself or around something else. Often used with up: roll up a poster.
12.
a. To envelop or enfold in a covering: roll dirty laundry in a sheet.
b. To make by shaping into a ball or cylinder: roll a cigarette.
13. To spread, compress, or flatten by applying pressure with a roller: roll pastry dough.
14. Printing To apply ink to (type) with a roller or rollers.
15. Games To throw (dice), as in craps.
16. Slang To rob (a drunken, sleeping, or otherwise helpless person).
n.
1. The act or an instance of rolling.
2. Something rolled up: a roll of tape.
3. A quantity, as of cloth or wallpaper, rolled into a cylinder and often considered as a unit of measure.
4. A piece of parchment or paper that may be or is rolled up; a scroll.
5. A register or a catalogue.
6. A list of names of persons belonging to a group.
7. A mass in cylindrical or rounded form: a roll of tobacco.
8.
a. A small rounded portion of bread.
b. A portion of food shaped like a tube with a filling.
9. A rolling, swaying, or rocking motion.
10. A gentle swell or undulation of a surface: the roll of the plains.
11. A deep reverberation or rumble: the roll of thunder.
12. A rapid succession of short sounds: the roll of a drum.
13. A trill: the roll of his r's.
14. A resonant, rhythmical flow of words.
15. A roller, especially a cylinder on which to roll something up or with which to flatten something.
16. A maneuver in which an airplane makes a single complete rotation about its longitudinal axis without changing direction or losing altitude.
17. Slang Money, especially a wad of paper money.
Phrasal Verbs:
roll back
1. To reduce (prices or wages, for example) to a previous lower level.
2. To cause to turn back or retreat.
roll out
1. To get out of bed.
2. To initiate or produce for the first time; introduce: roll out a new product line.
3. Football To execute a rollout.
roll over
1. To defer or postpone payment of (an obligation).
2. To renegotiate the terms of (a financial deal).
3. To reinvest (funds from a maturing security or from a tax-deferred account) into a similar security or account.
roll up
1. To arrive in a vehicle.
2. To accumulate; amass: rolled up quite a fortune.
3. To destroy or eliminate by military action: "Give him some infantry and he would roll up the enemy flank" (Brooks D. Simpson).
Idioms:
on a roll Informal
Undergoing or experiencing sustained, even increasing good fortune or success: "The stock market's on a roll" (Karen Pennar).
roll in the hay Slang
Sexual intercourse.
roll the bones Games
To cast dice, especially in craps.
roll with the punches Slang
To cope with and withstand adversity, especially by being flexible.

[Middle English rollen, from Old French roler, from Vulgar Latin *rotulāre, from Latin rotula, diminutive of rota, wheel; see ret- in Indo-European roots.]

rolling

(ˈrəʊlɪŋ)
adj
1. having gentle rising and falling slopes; undulating: rolling country.
2. progressing or spreading by stages or by occurrences in different places in succession, with continued or increasing effectiveness: three weeks of rolling strikes disrupted schools.
3. subject to regular review and updating: a rolling plan for overseas development.
4. deeply resounding; reverberating: rolling thunder.
5. slang extremely rich
6. that may be turned up or down: a rolling hat brim.
adv
slang swaying or staggering (in the phrase rolling drunk)

rolling

  • beachcomber - A long wave rolling in from the sea.
  • sprag - A block placed behind a car wheel to keep it from rolling down a hill.
  • keep the ball rolling - An allusion to rugby or bandy.
  • voluble - "Flowing with speech, talkative"; such a person has words "rolling" off his or her tongue.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rolling - a deep prolonged sound (as of thunder or large bells)rolling - a deep prolonged sound (as of thunder or large bells)
sound - the sudden occurrence of an audible event; "the sound awakened them"
2.rolling - the act of robbing a helpless person; "he was charged with rolling drunks in the park"
robbery - larceny by threat of violence
3.rolling - propelling something on wheelsrolling - propelling something on wheels  
actuation, propulsion - the act of propelling
Adj.1.rolling - uttered with a trill; "she used rolling r's as in Spanish"
pronounceable - capable of being uttered or pronounced; "a pronounceable group of letters"
Translations
ذو تِلال مُنْخَفِضَه بدون مُنْحَدَرات
vlnitý
bølgendekuperet
dimbes-dombos
öldóttur
dalgalıinişli yokuşlu

rolling

[ˈrəʊlɪŋ]
A. ADJ [waves] → fuerte; [sea] → agitado; [ship] → que se balancea; [countryside, hills] → ondulado
bring the water to a rolling boilesperar a que el agua alcance su verdadero punto de ebullición
to walk with a rolling gaitandar bamboleándose
a rolling programme of privatizationun programa de privatización escalonado
he's a rolling stonees muy inquieto, es culo de mal asiento
a rolling stone gathers no mosspiedra movediza nunca moho la cobija
B. ADV he was rolling drunkestaba tan borracho que se caía, estaba borracho como una cuba
C. N (Naut) → balanceo m
D. CPD rolling mill Ntaller m de laminación
rolling pin Nrodillo m (de cocina), uslero m (Andes)
rolling stock Nmaterial m rodante or móvil

rolling

[ˈrəʊlɪŋ] adj [landscape, countryside] → vallonné(e); [hills] → doux(douce)rolling mill nlaminoir mrolling pin nrouleau m à pâtisserierolling stock nmatériel m roulantroll-neck [ˈrəʊlnɛk]
n (British)col m roulé
modif [sweater] → à col rouléroll-necked [ˈrəʊlnɛkt] adj [sweater] → à col rouléroll of honour (British) ntableau m d'honneurroll-on [ˈrəʊlɒn]
n (also roll-on deodorant) → déodorant m à billeroll-on-roll-off [ˌrəʊlɒnrəʊlˈɒf] adj (British) [ferry] → transroulier/ièreroll-out [ˈrəʊlaʊt] n [new technology, system, product] → déploiement m

rolling

adj
(= swaying) motionschwankend; shipschlingernd; sea, wavesrollend, wogend; to have a rolling gaiteinen schaukelnden Gang haben; to be rolling drunksturzbetrunken sein (inf)
(= undulating) hillsgewellt; landscape, countrysidewellig, hügelig; lawnswellig
(= progressing) plan, programmekontinuierlich; three weeks of rolling strikesdreiwöchige Streikmaßnahmen pl; rolling news serviceNachrichtendienst mrund um die Uhr

rolling

:
rolling mill
n (= factory)Walzwerk nt; (= machine)Walze f
rolling pin
nNudelholz nt, → Teigrolle f
rolling stock
n (Rail) → rollendes Material, Fahrzeuge pl
rolling stone
n he’s a rollinger ist ein unsteter Bursche; a rolling gathers no moss (Prov) → wer rastet, der rostet (Prov)
rolling train
nWalzstraße f

rolling

[ˈrəʊlɪŋ]
1. adj (waves, sea) → ondeggiante; (countryside) → ondulato/a

roll1

(rəul) noun
1. anything flat (eg a piece of paper, a carpet) rolled into the shape of a tube, wound round a tube etc. a roll of kitchen foil; a toilet-roll.
2. a small piece of baked bread dough, used eg for sandwiches. a cheese roll.
3. an act of rolling. Our dog loves a roll on the grass.
4. a ship's action of rocking from side to side. She said that the roll of the ship made her feel ill.
5. a long low sound. the roll of thunder.
6. a thick mass of flesh. I'd like to get rid of these rolls of fat round my waist.
7. a series of quick beats (on a drum).
verb
1. to move by turning over like a wheel or ball. The coin/pencil rolled under the table; He rolled the ball towards the puppy; The ball rolled away.
2. to move on wheels, rollers etc. The children rolled the cart up the hill, then let it roll back down again.
3. to form (a piece of paper, a carpet) into the shape of a tube by winding. to roll the carpet back.
4. (of a person or animal in a lying position) to turn over. The doctor rolled the patient (over) on to his side; The dog rolled on to its back.
5. to shape (clay etc) into a ball or cylinder by turning it about between the hands. He rolled the clay into a ball.
6. to cover with something by rolling. When the little girl's dress caught fire, they rolled her in a blanket.
7. to make (something) flat or flatter by rolling something heavy over it. to roll a lawn; to roll pastry (out).
8. (of a ship) to rock from side to side while travelling forwards. The storm made the ship roll.
9. to make a series of low sounds. The thunder rolled; The drums rolled.
10. to move (one's eyes) round in a circle to express fear, surprise etc.
11. to travel in a car etc. We were rolling along merrily when a tyre burst.
12. (of waves, rivers etc) to move gently and steadily. The waves rolled in to the shore.
13. (of time) to pass. Months rolled by.
ˈroller noun
1. any of a number of tube-shaped objects, or machines fitted with one or more such objects, for flattening, crushing, printing etc. a garden roller; a road-roller.
2. a small tube-shaped object on which hair is wound to curl it.
3. a small solid wheel or cylinder on which something can be rolled along.
4. a long large wave on the sea.
ˈrolling adjective
(of a landscape) having low hills and shallow valleys, without steep slopes.
ˈroller-skate noun
a skate with wheels instead of a blade. a pair of roller-skates.
verb
to move on roller-skates. You shouldn't roller-skate on the pavement.
ˈrolling-pin noun
a usually wooden roller for flattening out dough.
roll in verb
to come in or be got in large numbers or amounts. I'd like to own a chain store and watch the money rolling in.
roll up
1. to form into a roll. to roll up the carpet; He rolled up his sleeves.
2. to arrive. John rolled up ten minutes late.
3. (especially shouted to a crowd at a fair etc) to come near. Roll up! Roll up! Come and see the bearded lady!
References in classic literature ?
muttered Jo, rolling her eyes and clutching at the air, as she had seen a famous tragedian do.
He appeared to be lost in thought, rolling his eyes about and running a thin nervous hand through his hair.
When he straightened himself up to greet us, drops of perspiration were rolling from his thick nose down onto his curly beard.
I have forgotten nothing at Grand Isle," he said, not looking at her, but rolling a cigarette.
According to the orders of the preceding night, the heavy sleep of the army was broken by the rolling of the warning drums, whose rattling echoes were heard issuing, on the damp morning air, out of every vista of the woods, just as day began to draw the shaggy outlines of some tall pines of the vicinity, on the opening brightness of a soft and cloudless eastern sky.
The bank of the river was changed; the flat had become an island, between which and the slope where she stood the North Fork was rolling its resistless yellow torrent.
A cab; an omnibus, with its populous interior, dropping here and there a passenger, and picking up another, and thus typifying that vast rolling vehicle, the world, the end of whose journey is everywhere and nowhere; these objects he followed eagerly with his eyes, but forgot them before the dust raised by the horses and wheels had settled along their track.
So forcibly did he dwell upon this symbol, for the hour or more during which his periods were rolling over the people's heads, that it assumed new terrors in their imagination, and seemed to derive its scarlet hue from the flames of the infernal pit.
He could not help, too, rolling his large eyes round him as he ate, and chuckling with the possibility that he might one day be lord of all this scene of almost unimaginable luxury and splendor.
Remember, also, that the surgeon must operate from above, some eight or ten feet intervening between him and his subject, and that subject almost hidden in a discolored, rolling, and oftentimes tumultuous and bursting sea.
The firemen leaped to the ground; there was no need to ask where the fire was -- it was rolling up in a great blaze from the roof.
Do you want me to believe that with these arms"--and he would clench his fists and hold them up in the air, so that you might see the rolling muscles--that with these arms people will ever let me starve?