romanticization


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ro·man·ti·cize

 (rō-măn′tĭ-sīz′)
v. ro·man·ti·cized, ro·man·ti·ciz·ing, ro·man·ti·ciz·es
v.tr.
To view or interpret romantically; make romantic.
v.intr.
To think in a romantic way.

ro·man′ti·ci·za′tion (-sĭ-zā′shən) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.romanticization - the act of indulging in sentiment
idealization, glorification, idealisation - a portrayal of something as ideal; "the idealization of rural life was very misleading"
References in periodicals archive ?
This romanticization of the African continent and the famous lovers is where Circling the Sun falters" ELIZABETH TOOHEY
This romanticization of "real" factory labour is never really interrogated, although the writers may have been subtly critical of Gladys since she was also unable to completely leave her fashionable lifestyle, clothes, and contacts behind.
In Singapore, the exoticization and romanticization of Nyonya embroidery, cuisine and clothing in the series has also come under fire for emphasizing stereotypical aspects of Peranakan culture.
But it's hard not to blush at his serial romanticization of an electorate of which only 61 per cent even bothered to turn out to vote.
The purpose of my inquiry is not to assert that the engagement in Indigenous or non-Western classics as new theoretical possibilities leads necessarily to the romanticization of the Other, but to initiate discussions along the lines of Heise and Deloria at this crossroads of ecocriticism's transnationalization.
Indeed I had come upon the realization that the romanticization of the Highlanders in particular had a lot in common with the glowing patina around Native Americans (in particular the Plains Indians) and even the dying generation of now harmless communists.
Nawaz Sharif's romanticization with erstwhile Lahore Declaration is unrealistic.
Understanding the Retreat to the 'Exotic'" (Chapter 1) traces (through, among others, Proust, Ravel, Lytton, Mircea Eliade, Tennyson, even Beethoven, and of course Gautier, who features throughout) a nineteenth-century interest in the past, a romanticization of "history", and how the "Middle Ages" (as "temporallyinitiated" inspiration) could then evoke images similar to those evoked by the "Orient" (as "geographically-initiated" inspiration) (p.
Kattman explained that the model of building large, insulated sites can be traced back to a post-World War Il romanticization of sprawling development and the subsequent rise of suburbia, but what's changing this outlook is an exceptional convergence of different generations' views on living a connected life.
In another way, the romanticization (if that's a word) can get quite annoying.
According to Marilyn Grace Miller, nationalist projects employing mestizaje rhetoric resulted in an "erosion of 'regions of refuge' such as autonomous indigenous communities, whether geographic or linguistic, and the romanticization or folkorization of the Indian and the black, thereby dismissing their active engagement with contemporary political practices".
As Griselda Pollock has demonstrated, van Gogh had become the paradigm of the bourgeois prototype of the mad genius through an overexploitation and romanticization of biographical facts.