rookery


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rook·er·y

 (ro͝ok′ə-rē)
n. pl. rook·er·ies
1.
a. A place where large numbers of rooks or certain seabirds or marine animals, such as penguins or seals, nest or breed.
b. A colony of such animals.
2. Informal A crowded and dilapidated tenement or area.

rookery

(ˈrʊkərɪ)
n, pl -eries
1. (Zoology) a group of nesting rooks
2. (Zoology) a clump of trees containing rooks' nests
3. (Zoology)
a. a breeding ground or communal living area of certain other species of gregarious birds or mammals, esp penguins or seals
b. a colony of any such creatures
4. archaic an overcrowded slum tenement building or area of housing

rook•er•y

(ˈrʊk ə ri)

n., pl. -er•ies.
1. a colony or breeding place of rooks or other gregarious creatures, as penguins or seals.
2. any teeming, overcrowded place.
[1715–25]

rook·er·y

(ro͝ok′ə-rē)
A place where certain birds or animals, such as crows, penguins, and seals, gather to breed.

rookery

a breeding or nesting place of rooks or of any gregarious bird or animal.
See also: Animals, Birds

Rookery

 a collection of rooks’ nests; the breeding place or large colony of sea birds or other marine mammals; hence, the birds themselves, as herons or penguins; a cluster of dilapidated buildings. See also building.
Examples: rookery of albatross, 1838; of buildings; of crows, 1822; of herons; of penguins, 1840; of prostitutes, 1851; of rooks, 1725; of sea bears, 1881; of sea elephants, 1860; of seals, 1847; of volcanoes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rookery - a breeding ground for gregarious birds (such as rooks)rookery - a breeding ground for gregarious birds (such as rooks)
breeding ground - a place where animals breed
heronry - a breeding ground for herons; a heron rookery
Translations

rookery

[ˈrʊkərɪ] Ncolonia f de grajos

rookery

nKolonie f

rookery

[ˈrʊkərɪ] ncolonia di corvi
References in classic literature ?
Its grey front stood out well from the background of a rookery, whose cawing tenants were now on the wing: they flew over the lawn and grounds to alight in a great meadow, from which these were separated by a sunk fence, and where an array of mighty old thorn trees, strong, knotty, and broad as oaks, at once explained the etymology of the mansion's designation.
Calls a house a rookery when there's not a rook near it, and takes the birds on trust, because he sees the nests
I am the last of the Lost Rookery of Masafuera, and in the days when men killed us by the hundred thousand there was a story on the beaches that some day a white seal would come out of the North and lead the seal people to a quiet place.
Long since, he thought; and then, casting his eye through the front glass, which had been recently occluded by the figure of the jarvey, he beheld the tree-tops of the rookery in Randolph Crescent.
Agony of pain and suffocation--and all the while the earth, the fields, the pebbly brook at the bottom of the rookery, the fresh scent after the rain, the light of the morning through my chamber-window, the warmth of the hearth after the frosty air--will darkness close over them for ever?
Lord John Roxton and I turned down Vigo Street together and through the dingy portals of the famous aristocratic rookery.
You must not try to take them too seriously; but the fact is, there is just the least bit of a twitter against me in this rookery of an Albany.
We arrived at a tumble-down old rookery called the Palazzo Simonetti--a massive hewn-stone affair occupied by a family of ragged Italians.
To them he spoke in a deep, quivering voice, and said he, "An ye go within a score of feet of yonder room, I will tear down your rookery over your heads so that not one stone shall be left upon another.
Ere long, even they were left in shadow--the shadow of the distant hills, or of the earth itself; and, in sympathy for the busy citizens of the rookery, I regretted to see their habitation, so lately bathed in glorious light, reduced to the sombre, work-a-day hue of the lower world, or of my own world within.
Come, Sir Knights," spoke Paul of Merely, "we will ride within and learn what manner of churls inhabit this ancient rookery.
Birmingham's planning committee was split over the proposal to adapt the building on the corner of Rookery Road and Newcombe Road.