rook

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rook 1

 (ro͝ok)
n.
1. A Eurasian corvid (Corvus frugilegus) having black plumage with a patch of bare skin around the base of the bill, and nesting in colonies near the tops of trees.
2. A swindler or cheat, especially at games.
tr.v. rooked, rook·ing, rooks
To swindle; cheat: Customers are afraid of being rooked by unscrupulous vendors.

[Middle English rok, from Old English hrōc.]

rook 2

 (ro͝ok)
n. Abbr. R
A chess piece that may move in a straight line over any number of empty squares in a rank or file. Also called castle.

[Middle English rok, from Old French roc, from Arabic ruḫḫ, from Persian.]

rook

(rʊk)
n
1. (Animals) a large Eurasian passerine bird, Corvus frugilegus, with a black plumage and a whitish base to its bill: family Corvidae (crows)
2. slang a swindler or cheat, esp one who cheats at cards
vb
(tr) slang to overcharge, swindle, or cheat
[Old English hrōc; related to Old High German hruoh, Old Norse hrōkr]

rook

(rʊk)
n
(Chess & Draughts) a chesspiece that may move any number of unoccupied squares in a straight line, horizontally or vertically. Also called: castle
[C14: from Old French rok, ultimately from Arabic rukhkh]

rook1

(rʊk)

n.
1. a black, bare-faced Eurasian crow, Corvus frugilegus, that nests and roosts colonially.
2. a sharper at cards or dice; swindler.
v.t.
3. to cheat or swindle.
[before 900; Middle English rok(e), Old English hrōc, c. Old High German hruoh, Old Norse hrōkr]

rook2

(rʊk)

n.
one of two chess pieces of the same color that may be moved any number of unobstructed squares horizontally or vertically; castle.
[1300–50; Middle English rok < Old French roc < Arabic rukhkh < Persian rukh]

rook


Past participle: rooked
Gerund: rooking

Imperative
rook
rook
Present
I rook
you rook
he/she/it rooks
we rook
you rook
they rook
Preterite
I rooked
you rooked
he/she/it rooked
we rooked
you rooked
they rooked
Present Continuous
I am rooking
you are rooking
he/she/it is rooking
we are rooking
you are rooking
they are rooking
Present Perfect
I have rooked
you have rooked
he/she/it has rooked
we have rooked
you have rooked
they have rooked
Past Continuous
I was rooking
you were rooking
he/she/it was rooking
we were rooking
you were rooking
they were rooking
Past Perfect
I had rooked
you had rooked
he/she/it had rooked
we had rooked
you had rooked
they had rooked
Future
I will rook
you will rook
he/she/it will rook
we will rook
you will rook
they will rook
Future Perfect
I will have rooked
you will have rooked
he/she/it will have rooked
we will have rooked
you will have rooked
they will have rooked
Future Continuous
I will be rooking
you will be rooking
he/she/it will be rooking
we will be rooking
you will be rooking
they will be rooking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been rooking
you have been rooking
he/she/it has been rooking
we have been rooking
you have been rooking
they have been rooking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been rooking
you will have been rooking
he/she/it will have been rooking
we will have been rooking
you will have been rooking
they will have been rooking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been rooking
you had been rooking
he/she/it had been rooking
we had been rooking
you had been rooking
they had been rooking
Conditional
I would rook
you would rook
he/she/it would rook
we would rook
you would rook
they would rook
Past Conditional
I would have rooked
you would have rooked
he/she/it would have rooked
we would have rooked
you would have rooked
they would have rooked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rook - (chess) the piece that can move any number of unoccupied squares in a direction parallel to the sides of the chessboardrook - (chess) the piece that can move any number of unoccupied squares in a direction parallel to the sides of the chessboard
chess game, chess - a board game for two players who move their 16 pieces according to specific rules; the object is to checkmate the opponent's king
chess piece, chessman - any of 16 white and 16 black pieces used in playing the game of chess
2.rook - common gregarious Old World bird about the size and color of the American crowrook - common gregarious Old World bird about the size and color of the American crow
corvine bird - birds of the crow family
genus Corvus, Corvus - type genus of the Corvidae: crows and ravens
Verb1.rook - deprive of by deceitrook - deprive of by deceit; "He swindled me out of my inheritance"; "She defrauded the customers who trusted her"; "the cashier gypped me when he gave me too little change"
short, short-change - cheat someone by not returning him enough money
cheat, rip off, chisel - deprive somebody of something by deceit; "The con-man beat me out of $50"; "This salesman ripped us off!"; "we were cheated by their clever-sounding scheme"; "They chiseled me out of my money"

rook

noun
Related words
collective nouns building, clamour
habitation rookery

rook

nounverb
To get money or something else from by deceitful trickery:
Informal: chisel, flimflam, take, trim.
Slang: diddle, do, gyp, stick, sting.
Translations
رُخ في لُعْبَة الشَّطْرَنْجغُراب القَيْظ
топ
havranvěž
tårnråge
turo
vanker
linnoitusmustavaristorni
tourcorbeau freuxcorneillefreux
kulatoptvrđava
bástyavetési varjú
benteng
hrókurbláhrafn
ルーク
turris
kovarniskovas
krauķistornis
turn
havranveža
trdnjava
råkatorn
kaleekin kargası
тура

rook

1 [rʊk]
A. N (Orn) → grajo m
B. VT (= swindle) → estafar, timar
you've been rookedte han estafado or timado

rook

2 [rʊk] N (Chess) → torre f

rook

[ˈrʊk]
n
(= bird) → freux m

rook

n
(= bird)Saatkrähe f
(= swindler)Betrüger(in) m(f), → Gauner(in) m(f)
(Chess) → Turm m
vt (= swindle)übers Ohr hauen (inf), → betrügen; to rook somebody of £5jdm £ 5 abgaunern
vi (Chess) → mit dem Turm ziehen

rook

1 [rʊk]
1. n (bird) → corvo
2. vt (fam) (swindle) → imbrogliare, truffare

rook

2 [rʊk] n (Chess) → torre f

rook

(ruk) noun
1. a kind of crow.
2. (usually ˈcastle) a chess-piece.
References in classic literature ?
I remember as a most pleasant impression the broad, clear front, its open windows and fresh curtains and the pair of maids looking out; I remember the lawn and the bright flowers and the crunch of my wheels on the gravel and the clustered treetops over which the rooks circled and cawed in the golden sky.
I was yet enjoying the calm prospect and pleasant fresh air, yet listening with delight to the cawing of the rooks, yet surveying the wide, hoary front of the hall, and thinking what a great place it was for one lonely little dame like Mrs.
When he bought the house, he liked to think that there were rooks about it.
The cathedral chimes had at once a sadder and a more remote sound to me, as I hurried on avoiding observation, than they had ever had before; so, the swell of the old organ was borne to my ears like funeral music; and the rooks, as they hovered about the grey tower and swung in the bare high trees of the priory-garden, seemed to call to me that the place was changed, and that Estella was gone out of it for ever.
The rooks were awake in Randolph Crescent; but the windows looked down, discreetly blinded, on the return of the prodigal.
So here we are, installed in this beautiful old house, and from both my bedroom and the drawing room I can see the great elms of the cathedral close, with their great black stems standing out against the old yellow stone of the cathedral, and I can hear the rooks overhead cawing and cawing and chattering and chattering and gossiping all day, after the manner of rooks--and humans.
Noirtier, for whom France was a vast chess-board, from which pawns, rooks, knights, and queens were to disappear, so that the king was checkmated -- M.
And as to people saying a few idle words about us, we must not mind that, any more than the old church-steeple minds the rooks cawing about it.
The daylight has nothing to show me, since you are not here, and I don't like to see the rooks and starlings in the field, because I grieve and grieve to miss you who used to see them with me.
The rooks, swinging in their lofty houses in the elm-tree avenue, seem to discuss the question of the occupancy of the carriage as it passes underneath, some agreeing that Sir Leicester and my Lady are come down, some arguing with malcontents who won't admit it, now all consenting to consider the question disposed of, now all breaking out again in violent debate, incited by one obstinate and drowsy bird who will persist in putting in a last contradictory croak.
There was a colony of rooks in the great elms, and they filled the air with melancholy cries.
Straight flew the arrow, and all shouted till the very flags that waved in the breeze shook with the sound, and the rooks and daws flew clamoring about the roofs of the old gray tower, for the shaft had lodged close beside the spot that marked the very center.