root cap


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root cap

n. Botany
A thimble-shaped mass of cells that covers and protects the root tip.

root cap

n
1. (Botany) a hollow cone of loosely arranged cells that covers the growing tip of a root and protects it during its passage through the soil
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.root cap - thimble-shaped mass of cells covering and protecting the growing tip of a rootroot cap - thimble-shaped mass of cells covering and protecting the growing tip of a root
plant organ - a functional and structural unit of a plant or fungus
root - (botany) the usually underground organ that lacks buds or leaves or nodes; absorbs water and mineral salts; usually it anchors the plant to the ground
References in periodicals archive ?
There is also a reduction in the size of the root cap and derangement of the meristematic tissue, besides the formation of protoxylem and endoderm in regions close to the root apex with high contents of lignin (Miguel et al.
Furthermore, Barker and Pilbeam (2007) explained that Al can reduce root cell division; hence, it causes disruption of root cap processes, inhibiting root elongation.
The effects of aluminum on root cap function and root development in Zea mays L.
With injury to the root cap, the levels of cytokinin, which controls the root geotropic curvature, will be reduced and will induce gravitropic inversion (ALONI et al.
Further division at the distal end of the apical meristem gave rise to a root cap consisting of three-four layers of cells that were more vacuolated than centrally located cells.
1) where the root cap is formed by an elongated columella deriving from the columella mother cells below the permanent initials.
Root mucilage is primarily produced by the root cap (border) cells, is left behind as the root grows forward, and contains complex polysaccharides with charged carboxyl groups, neutral sugars, proteins, and phenolics, depending on species (Miki et al.
It is worth noting that the root cap and the root tip region at the boundary of root cap in all root tissue prints showed syr-oxidase activity.
The key parts of the root are the primary root, secondary root, root hairs, and root cap.
Therefore, the distance from the root cap to any point along the root could be easily calculated from the number of image frames from the root cap and the number of pixels from the edge of the image field.
The root cap was removed and meristematic tissues were squashed on slides.
However, disordered root growth and negative gravitropism should occur with the necrosis of the root cap and, consequently, in statoliths (BURGOS et al.