roothold

root·hold

 (ro͞ot′hōld′, ro͝ot′-)
n.
1. Support or stabilization of a plant in the soil through the spreading of its roots.
2. A place where a plant establishes a roothold.

roothold

(ˈruːtˌhəʊld)
n
(Plants) the spreading of the roots in order to support a plant
References in periodicals archive ?
Top weed performers are typically generalists, capable of getting a roothold in disturbed environments, thriving under a diversity of conditions.
While mullein is not an endangered plant--the ultimate volunteer, it can get a roothold anywhere, including sidewalk cracks--some popular herbs are.
This will allow young native trees such as oak, ash or beech to reclaim a roothold in the woods.
Blackberry": Dew-licked, /teetering & ripe,//crypts plumped up/with bright drizzle,//this purple-witted seed-star, /earth-lodged & lonesome,//old prophet once pleasure-shy,/now aching in thornlight,//sway, roothold, desire//whipped fast with impulse,//hands reaching, ripping, riddling--all/to bring the old sweet trinket home.
Blackberry": Dew-licked,/teetering & ripe,//crypts plumped up/with bright drizzle,//this purple-witted seed-star,/earth-lodged & lonesome,//old prophet once pleasure-shy,/now aching in thornlight,//sway, roothold, desire//whipped fast with impulse,//hands reaching, ripping, riddling--all/to bring the old sweet trinket home.
If you allow them to gain a roothold, future battles will be fought to contain them.
No stranger to extremes, whitebarks inhabit high-altitude environments near timberline, where other tree species find it difficult to establish a roothold.
Without regular burns, other ground covers such as sage, bear clover, and manzanita got a roothold, along with seedlings of pines and shade-tolerant trees such as white, grand, and interior Douglas firs.