rose-breasted grosbeak


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rose-breasted grosbeak

n.
A migratory songbird (Pheucticus ludovicianus) of the Americas, the male of which is black and white with a rose-red patch on the breast.

rose′-breast`ed gros′beak


n.
a North American grosbeak, Pheucticus ludovicianus, the male of which has a rose-pink triangular breast patch.
[1800–10, Amer.]
References in periodicals archive ?
With his bold black-and-white feathers accented with a slash of red on the chest, the male rose-breasted grosbeak is a striking sight.
One example is the Blackheaded Grosbeak (Pheucticus melanocephalus), which is most often recorded in the East during late fall and winter, yet none is shown in this plumage to allow the more advanced or intermediate birder to compare with Rose-breasted Grosbeak (P.
I can't remember all the species now, but one was unmistakably a Rose-breasted Grosbeak.
For example, the rose-breasted grosbeak has declined in mass by about 4 percent, while the Kentucky warbler has dropped 3.
Small forest patches may also act as sinks for birds, such as Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla), Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina), Veery (Catharus fuscescens), and Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus), in a metapopulation context (Nol et al.
5 (Seiurus noveboracensis) Wood duck (Aix sponsa) -- -- -- Prairie warbler (Dendroica discolor) -- -- -- Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) -- -- -- Northern oriole (Icterus galbula) -- -- -- Black-crowned night heron -- -- -- (Nyctiocorax nyctiocorax) Rose-breasted grosbeak -- -- -- (Pheucticus ludovicianus) Blue-headed vireo (Vireo solitarius) -- -- -- Cx.
In contrast, 7 species (Scarlet Tanager, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Tufted Titmouse, White-breasted Nuthatch, Downy Woodpecker, Northern Cardinal, Hooded Warbler) were at least 1 standard deviation below their historical mean.
BIRDERS FLOCK TO SEE GROSBEAK: Bird lovers in southern Oregon have been beating the bushes with their binoculars hoping to catch a glimpse of a rare rose-breasted grosbeak, which has been seen hanging around a Medford bird feeder since Saturday.
One year, the crowd of 332, still a record, evaporated in seconds when news came through of a newly- arrived rose-breasted grosbeak just up the road.
There are at least two pairs of cardinals and their offspring among the regulars, along with yellow and purple finches (they turn brown for winter) as well as a rose-breasted grosbeak, red-bellied and downy woodpeckers, cowbirds, grackles, robins and blue jays.
Mobbing species included Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus), Downy Woodpecker, Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata), Black-capped Chickadee, Tufted Titmouse, White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis), American Robin (Turdus migratorius), Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis), eight species of warblers, Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis), and Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus); the mobbing behavior lasted ~10 min.