rosemary


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Related to rosemary: thyme

rose·mar·y

 (rōz′mâr′ē)
n. pl. rose·mar·ies
1. An aromatic evergreen Mediterranean shrub (Rosmarinus officinalis) in the mint family, having light blue or pink flowers and narrow grayish-green leaves that are used in cooking and perfumery.
2. The leaves of this plant used as a seasoning.

[Alteration (probably influenced by rose Mary) of Middle English rosmarine, from Latin rōs marīnus, rōsmarīnum : rōs, dew (perhaps from the essential oil glands on the whitish underside of its leaves ) + marīnus, of the sea; see marine.]

rosemary

(ˈrəʊzmərɪ)
n, pl -maries
(Plants) an aromatic European shrub, Rosmarinus officinalis, widely cultivated for its grey-green evergreen leaves, which are used in cookery for flavouring and yield a fragrant oil used in the manufacture of perfumes: family Lamiaceae (labiates). It is the traditional flower of remembrance
[C15: earlier rosmarine, from Latin rōs dew + marīnus marine; modern form influenced by folk etymology, as if rose1 + Mary]

rose•mar•y

(ˈroʊzˌmɛər i)

n., pl. -mar•ies.
an aromatic evergreen shrub, Rosmarinus officinalis, of the mint family, native to the Mediterranean region, with narrow, leathery leaves used as a seasoning and in perfumes.
[1400–50; rose mary (by folk etym., influenced by rose1 and the name Mary) < Latin rōs marīnus or rōs maris literally, sea dew]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rosemary - widely cultivated for its fragrant grey-green leaves used in cooking and in perfumeryrosemary - widely cultivated for its fragrant grey-green leaves used in cooking and in perfumery
rosemary - extremely pungent leaves used fresh or dried as seasoning for especially meats
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
2.rosemary - extremely pungent leaves used fresh or dried as seasoning for especially meats
herb - aromatic potherb used in cookery for its savory qualities
rosemary, Rosmarinus officinalis - widely cultivated for its fragrant grey-green leaves used in cooking and in perfumery
Translations
розмарин
rozmarýn
rosmarin
RosmarinRosemarie
rosmariini
romarinRose-Marie
ružmarin
rozmaring
ローズマリー
로즈메리
rozmarin
rozmarín
rožmarin
rosmarinRose-MarieRos-Marie
ไม้พุ่มสมุนไพร
cây hương thảo

rosemary

[ˈrəʊzmərɪ] N (= herb) → romero m

rosemary

[ˈrəʊzməri] nromarin mrose-tinted [ˈrəʊztɪntɪd] adjrose
to look at sb/sth through rose-tinted glasses, to look at sb/sth through rose-tinted spectacles (British)ne voir que les bons côtés de qn/qch
to see life through rose-tinted glasses, to see life through rose-tinted spectacles → voir la vie en rose

rosemary

nRosmarin m

rosemary

[ˈrəʊzmrɪ] nrosmarino

rosemary

إِكْلِيلُ الـجَبَل rozmarýn rosmarin Rosmarin δεντρολίβανο romero rosmariini romarin ružmarin rosmarino ローズマリー 로즈메리 rozemarijn rosmarin rozmaryn alecrim розмарин rosmarin ไม้พุ่มสมุนไพร biberiye cây hương thảo 迷迭香

rosemary

n (bot) romero
References in classic literature ?
For now, while so quietly Lying, it fancies A holier odor About it, of pansies -- A rosemary odor, Commingled with pansies -- With rue and the beautiful Puritan pansies.
She also sold herbs, and rosemary tea, and rabbit-tobacco (which is what WE call lavender).
Sancho did as he bade him, but one of the goatherds, seeing the wound, told him not to be uneasy, as he would apply a remedy with which it would be soon healed; and gathering some leaves of rosemary, of which there was a great quantity there, he chewed them and mixed them with a little salt, and applying them to the ear he secured them firmly with a bandage, assuring him that no other treatment would be required, and so it proved.
The grass wore the deep tint of the cypress, and the heads of its blades hung droopingly, and hither and thither among it were many small unsightly hillocks, low and narrow, and not very long, that had the aspect of graves, but were not; although over and all about them the rue and the rosemary clambered.
On the following morning at five o'clock D'Artagnan arose, and descending to the kitchen without help, asked, among other ingredients the list of which has not come down to us, for some oil, some wine, and some rosemary, and with his mother's recipe in his hand composed a balsam, with which he anointed his numerous wounds, replacing his bandages himself, and positively refusing the assistance of any doctor, D'Artagnan walked about that same evening, and was almost cured by the morrow.
But when the time came to pay for his rosemary, this oil, and the wine, the only expense the master had incurred, as he had preserved a strict abstinence--while on the contrary, the yellow horse, by the account of the hostler at least, had eaten three times as much as a horse of his size could reasonably supposed to have done--D'Artagnan found nothing in his pocket but his little old velvet purse with the eleven crowns it contained; for as to the letter addressed to M.
When one danced with them, one smelled their clean, freshly ironed clothes that had been put away with rosemary leaves from Mr.
CAPTAIN WRAGGE stopped nearly midway in the one little row of houses composing Rosemary Lane, and let himself and his guest in at the door of his lodgings with his own key.
His last chance is that you may send for your box to the cloak-room -- you don't send for it -- and there the clerk is to-night (thanks to Captain Wragge and Rosemary Lane) at the end of his resources.
To what amazing infusions of gentian, peppermint, gilliflower, sage, parsley, thyme, rue, rosemary, and dandelion, did his courageous stomach submit itself
And I'll have a bit o' rosemary, and bergamot, and thyme, because they're so sweet-smelling; but there's no lavender only in the gentlefolks' gardens, I think.
This is myrrh and rosemary to keep the other sweet.