rostrum


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Related to rostrum: rostra

ros·trum

 (rŏs′trəm, rô′strəm)
n. pl. ros·trums or ros·tra (rŏs′trə, rô′strə)
1. A dais, pulpit, or other elevated platform for public speaking.
2.
a. The curved, beaklike prow of an ancient Roman ship, especially a war galley.
b. The speaker's platform in an ancient Roman forum, which was decorated with the prows of captured enemy ships.
3. Biology A beaklike projection, especially:
a. An anterior projection of an insect's or an arachnid's mouthparts, of the upper jaw of a cetacean, or of the cephalothorax of a crustacean.
b. A beaklike projection of a plant part, as the fruit of a geranium.

[Latin rōstrum, beak; see rēd- in Indo-European roots.]

rostrum

(ˈrɒstrəm)
n, pl -trums or -tra (-trə)
1. any platform, stage, or dais on which public speakers stand to address an audience
2. (Classical Music) a platform or dais in front of an orchestra on which the conductor stands
3. (Nautical Terms) another word for ram5
4. (Historical Terms) another word for ram5
5. (Historical Terms) the prow or beak of an ancient Roman ship
6. (Nautical Terms) the prow or beak of an ancient Roman ship
7. (Biology) biology zoology a beak or beaklike part
[C16: from Latin rōstrum beak, ship's prow, from rōdere to nibble, gnaw; in plural, rōstra, orator's platform, because this platform in the Roman forum was adorned with the prows of captured ships]

ros•trum

(ˈrɒs trəm)

n., pl. -trums, -tra (-trə)
1. any platform, stage, or the like, for public speaking.
2. a pulpit.
3. a beaklike anatomical process or extension of a part.
4. a beaklike projection from the prow of a ship, esp. one on an ancient warship for ramming an enemy ship; ram.
5. Usu., rostra. (sometimes cap.) the speaker's platform in the Forum of ancient Rome.
[1570–80; < Latin rōstrum snout, beak of a bird, ship's prow]
ros′tral, adj.
ros′trate (-treɪt) adj.
lectern, podium, dais, rostrum - A lectern is the stand on which the speaker's notes are placed, the podium is the platform on which the speaker and lectern stand, a dais is a platform for several people, and a rostrum is a platform for one or more.
See also related terms for platform.

rostrum

- Latin for "beak," it first referred to part of the Rome Forum decorated with bird beaks and used as a platform for speakers.
See also related terms for platform.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rostrum - a platform raised above the surrounding level to give prominence to the person on itrostrum - a platform raised above the surrounding level to give prominence to the person on it
platform - a raised horizontal surface; "the speaker mounted the platform"
2.rostrum - beaklike projection of the anterior part of the head of certain insects such as e.g. weevils
nose, olfactory organ - the organ of smell and entrance to the respiratory tract; the prominent part of the face of man or other mammals; "he has a cold in the nose"

rostrum

noun stage, stand, platform, podium, dais He stood on the winner's rostrum.
Translations
مِنْبَر، منَصَّه
tribuna
talerstol
karmesteri pódiumszónoki emelvény
ræîupallur
katedratribīne

rostrum

[ˈrɒstrəm] N (rostrums or rostra (pl)) [ˈrɒstrə]
A. Ntribuna f
B. CPD rostrum cameraman N (TV) → cámara-truca m

rostrum

[ˈrɒstrəm] ntribune f (pour un orateur etc)

rostrum

n pl <rostra> → Tribüne f, → Rednerpult nt; (for conductor) → Dirigentenpult nt

rostrum

[ˈrɒstrəm] npodio, tribuna

rostrum

(ˈrostrəm) noun
a platform on which a public speaker stands.

ros·trum

L. rostro.
1. cara;
2. pico, proyección.
References in classic literature ?
Cost what it might, I would mount that rostrum and --
On the floor of this chamber, which was dotted with highly carved wooden desks and chairs, were assembled about forty or fifty male Martians around the steps of a rostrum.
My captor merely strode up to the rostrum, the others making way for him as he advanced.
Before and behind us marched armed guards, while three solid ranks of Zodangan soldiery lined either side of the aisle from the entrance to the rostrum.
Imagine a poor Frenchman ignorantly intruding upon a public rostrum sacred to some six-penny dignitary in America.
The first pupil whom the Abbé de Saint Pierre de Val, at the moment of beginning his reading on canon law, always perceived, glued to a pillar of the school Saint-Vendregesile, opposite his rostrum, was Claude Frollo, armed with his horn ink-bottle, biting his pen, scribbling on his threadbare knee, and, in winter, blowing on his fingers.
One by one the masters mounted the rostrum beside the slave block upon which stood their chattels.
Only a few of the desks were occupied--those in the front row, just below the rostrum.
drag the lecturer off the rostrum, and the male mutual instructor out of the class, and ease their poor addled heads of evenings by making them dance and sing with you.
Nor was Hugh by any means a passive follower, who scrupled to act without precise and definite orders; for when Mr Tappertit mounted on an empty cask which stood by way of rostrum in the room, and volunteered a speech upon the alarming crisis then at hand, he placed himself beside the orator, and though he grinned from ear to ear at every word he said, threw out such expressive hints to scoffers in the management of his cudgel, that those who were at first the most disposed to interrupt, became remarkably attentive, and were the loudest in their approbation.
Mr Boffin, as if he were about to have his portrait painted, or to be electrified, or to be made a Freemason, or to be placed at any other solitary disadvantage, ascended the rostrum prepared for him.
He made the A final but came in fourth, meaning he was still only a few points away from a place on the Nationals rostrum.