rotting


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rot

 (rŏt)
v. rot·ted, rot·ting, rots
v.intr.
1. To undergo decomposition, especially organic decomposition; decay. See Synonyms at decay.
2.
a. To become damaged, weakened, or useless because of decay: The beams had rotted away.
b. To disappear or fall by decaying: One could see the blackened areas where the branches had rotted off.
3. To deteriorate through neglect or inactivity; languish or decline: "He upset Alice by calling Washington ... a sink of boredom and saying he was rotting there" (John Dos Passos).
4. To decay morally; become degenerate.
v.tr.
To cause to decompose or decay.
n.
1. The process of rotting or the condition of being rotten: The rot spread quickly, rendering the bridge unsafe even for pedestrians.
2. Foot rot.
3. Any of several plant diseases characterized by the breakdown of tissue and caused by various bacteria, fungi, or oomycetes.
4. Pointless talk; nonsense: She always talks such rot.
5. Archaic Any of various diseases causing the decay of flesh.

[Middle English roten, from Old English rotian.]

rotting

(ˈrɒtɪŋ)
adj
decaying as a result of bacterial or fungal action
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rotting - (biology) the process of decay caused by bacterial or fungal actionrotting - (biology) the process of decay caused by bacterial or fungal action
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
decay - the process of gradually becoming inferior
Translations

rotting

[ˈrɒtɪŋ] ADJpodrido, que se está pudriendo

rotting

[ˈrɒtɪŋ] adj [leaves, fruit, teeth] → qui pourrit

rotting

adj meat, foodverfaulend; wood alsomodrig; carcass, bones alsoverwesend; teethfaul; fruitfaulig

rotting

[ˈrɒtɪŋ] adjin putrefazione
References in classic literature ?
In one there were some potatoes that had been frozen and were rotting, in the other was a little pile of flour.
Some less fortunate had mutilated themselves or burned themselves, or had brought horrible sores upon themselves with chemicals; you might suddenly encounter upon the street a man holding out to you a finger rotting and discolored with gangrene--or one with livid scarlet wounds half escaped from their filthy bandages.
It was a wild, forsaken road, now winding through dreary pine barrens, where the wind whispered mournfully, and now over log causeways, through long cypress swamps, the doleful trees rising out of the slimy, spongy ground, hung with long wreaths of funeral black moss, while ever and anon the loathsome form of the mocassin snake might be seen sliding among broken stumps and shattered branches that lay here and there, rotting in the water.
On her right hand, ranged in one long row from end to end of the opposite wall, hung a dismal collection of black, begrimed old p ictures, rotting from their frames, and representing battle-scenes by sea and land.
A peculiar stagnant smell hung over the anchorage--a smell of sodden leaves and rotting tree trunks.
The rotting of a corpse in a watery grave was not so fearful.
There's another thing I'd like," said the farmer, "but I'm afraid to mention it; however, out it must; for after all I can't let it be rotting in my breast, come what may.
The "dangerous class," the social scum, that passively rotting mass thrown off by the lowest layers of old society, may, here and there, be swept into the movement by a proletarian revolution; its conditions of life, however, prepare it far more for the part of a bribed tool of reactionary intrigue.
The fruit had fallen from the trees and lay rotting on the ground; a cow was feeding on the lawn and treading down the flowers in the borders, while a goat browsed on the shoots of the vines and munched the unripe grapes.
They blinked their eyes, shouldered one another about for more advantageous positions, scratched in the rotting vegetation upon the chance of unearthing a toothsome worm, or sat listlessly eyeing their king and the strange Mangani, who called himself thus but who more closely resembled the hated Tarmangani.
As long as it went through more frequented waters, we often saw the hulls of shipwrecked vessels that were rotting in the depths, and deeper down cannons, bullets, anchors, chains, and a thousand other iron materials eaten up by rust.
But as it was, the thing that struck me with keenest force was the enormous waste of labour to which this sombre wilderness of rotting paper testified.