rotting

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rot

 (rŏt)
v. rot·ted, rot·ting, rots
v.intr.
1. To undergo decomposition, especially organic decomposition; decay. See Synonyms at decay.
2.
a. To become damaged, weakened, or useless because of decay: The beams had rotted away.
b. To disappear or fall by decaying: One could see the blackened areas where the branches had rotted off.
3. To deteriorate through neglect or inactivity; languish or decline: "He upset Alice by calling Washington ... a sink of boredom and saying he was rotting there" (John Dos Passos).
4. To decay morally; become degenerate.
v.tr.
To cause to decompose or decay.
n.
1. The process of rotting or the condition of being rotten: The rot spread quickly, rendering the bridge unsafe even for pedestrians.
2. Foot rot.
3. Any of several plant diseases characterized by the breakdown of tissue and caused by various bacteria, fungi, or oomycetes.
4. Pointless talk; nonsense: She always talks such rot.
5. Archaic Any of various diseases causing the decay of flesh.

[Middle English roten, from Old English rotian.]

rotting

(ˈrɒtɪŋ)
adj
decaying as a result of bacterial or fungal action
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rotting - (biology) the process of decay caused by bacterial or fungal actionrotting - (biology) the process of decay caused by bacterial or fungal action
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
decay - the process of gradually becoming inferior
Translations

rotting

[ˈrɒtɪŋ] ADJpodrido, que se está pudriendo

rotting

[ˈrɒtɪŋ] adj [leaves, fruit, teeth] → qui pourrit

rotting

adj meat, foodverfaulend; wood alsomodrig; carcass, bones alsoverwesend; teethfaul; fruitfaulig

rotting

[ˈrɒtɪŋ] adjin putrefazione
References in periodicals archive ?
Adapted by Tony Marchant whose Holding On showed his clear affinity with Dickens, and given a sombre, melancholic tone by director Julian Jarrold, it has homed in on the novel's social satire themes of imprisonment and liberation, images of flying birds set against the claustrophobia of Miss Havisham's rottingly overgrown, decaying mansion and the confining oppressiveness of both young Pip's home and his relationship with his shrewish sister.