round-shouldered


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round-shoul·dered

(round′shōl′dərd)
adj.
Having the shoulders bent forward and drooping and the upper back rounded.

round-shouldered

adj
(Physiology) denoting a faulty posture characterized by drooping shoulders and a slight forward bending of the back

round′-shoul′dered



adj.
having the shoulders bent forward, giving a rounded form to the upper part of the back.
[1580–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.round-shouldered - having the back and shoulders rounded; not erect; "a little oldish misshapen stooping woman"
unerect - not upright in position or posture
Translations

round-shouldered

[ˈraʊndˈʃəʊldəd] ADJcargado de espaldas

round-shouldered

[ˌraʊndˈʃəʊldəd] adjcon le spalle curve

round

(raund) adjective
1. shaped like a circle or globe. a round hole; a round stone; This plate isn't quite round.
2. rather fat; plump. a round face.
adverb
1. in the opposite direction. He turned round.
2. in a circle. They all stood round and listened; A wheel goes round; All (the) year round.
3. from one person to another. They passed the letter round; The news went round.
4. from place to place. We drove round for a while.
5. in circumference. The tree measured two metres round.
6. to a particular place, usually a person's home. Are you coming round (to our house) tonight?
preposition
1. on all sides of. There was a wall round the garden; He looked round the room.
2. passing all sides of (and returning to the starting-place). They ran round the tree.
3. changing direction at. He came round the corner.
4. in or to all parts of. The news spread all round the town.
noun
1. a complete circuit. a round of drinks (= one for everyone present); a round of golf.
2. a regular journey one takes to do one's work. a postman's round.
3. a burst of cheering, shooting etc. They gave him a round of applause; The soldier fired several rounds.
4. a single bullet, shell etc. five hundred rounds of ammunition.
5. a stage in a competition etc. The winners of the first round will go through to the next.
6. a type of song sung by several singers singing the same tune starting in succession.
verb
to go round. The car rounded the corner.
ˈrounded adjective
curved; like part of the line forming a circle. a rounded arch.
ˈroundly adverb
plainly; rudely. He rebuked her roundly.
ˈroundness noun
rounds noun plural
a doctor's visits to his patients. The doctor is (out) on his rounds.
ˈall-round adjective
complete. It was an all-round success.
ˌall-ˈrounder noun
a person who has a talent for several different kinds of work, sport etc, or who can play in any position in a game.
ˈroundabout noun
1. a revolving machine on which one can ride for pleasure; a merry-go-round.
2. a circular piece of ground where several roads meet, and round which traffic must travel.
adjective
not direct. a roundabout route.
round figures/numbers
the nearest convenient or easily remembered numbers. Tell me the cost in round figures (ie $20 rather than $19.87).
ˌround-ˈshouldered adjective
with stooping shoulders.
round trip
1. (American) a journey to a place and back again (round-trip ticket a ticket for such a journey).
2. a trip to several places and back, taking a circular route.
all round
surrounding. There were people all round him.
round about
1. surrounding. She sat with her children round about her.
2. near. There are not many houses round about.
3. approximately. There must have been round about a thousand people there.
round off
1. to make something smooth etc. He rounded off the sharp corners with a file.
2. to complete successfully. He rounded off his career by becoming president.
round on
to turn to face (a person) suddenly, especially angrily.
round up to collect together: The farmer rounded up the sheep ( ˈround-up) noun
References in classic literature ?
I remember those girls merely as faces in the schoolroom, gay and rosy, or listless and dull, cut off below the shoulders, like cherubs, by the ink-smeared tops of the high desks that were surely put there to make us round-shouldered and hollow-chested.
The short, round-shouldered Captain Tushin, stumbling over the tail of the gun carriage, moved forward and, not noticing the general, looked out shading his eyes with his small hand.
He was a man of about forty-two years of age, of large build, but slightly round-shouldered.
Sergey Ivanovitch read the act and began to explain its meaning, but at that point a tall, stout, round-shouldered landowner, with dyed whiskers, in a tight uniform that cut the back of his neck, interrupted him.
And they stood on the rail of the ship, like round-shouldered soldiers all in a row, stern and still and stiff; while their great, gleaming, black eyes shot darting glances here and there and everywhere.
The big, round-shouldered sand-dunes were the sleeping giants of some old northern tale.
Stripped of the cunning artifices of the tailor, and standing forth in the garb of Eden--what a sorry, set of round-shouldered, spindle-shanked, crane-necked varlets would civilized men appear
Archer had been born a Newland, and mother and daughter, who were as like as sisters, were both, as people said, "true Newlands"; tall, pale, and slightly round-shouldered, with long noses, sweet smiles and a kind of drooping distinction like that in certain faded Reynolds portraits.
The man listened round-shouldered, but seeming much too stupid to understand.
Move with energy: A 2012 study compared the self-rated energy levels of volunteers after they walked, slouched and round-shouldered, down a hall-way and again after they skipped down the same hallway.