rove


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to rove: Karl Rove

rove 1

 (rōv)
v. roved, rov·ing, roves
v.intr.
1. To wander about, especially over a wide area; roam. See Synonyms at wander.
2. To be directed without apparent purpose; look in an idle or casual manner: His gazed roved over the faces in the crowd.
v.tr.
1. To roam or wander around, over, or through: Vikings roved the seas.
2. To look at or around (an area) in an idle or casual manner: Her eyes roved the room.
n.
An act of wandering about, over, around, or through.

[Middle English roven, to shoot arrows at a mark.]

rove 2

 (rōv)
tr.v. roved, rov·ing, roves
1. To card (wool).
2. To put (fibers) through an eye or opening.
3. To stretch and twist (fibers) before spinning; ravel out.
n.
See roving.

[Origin unknown.]

rove 3

 (rōv)
v. Nautical
A past tense and a past participle of reeve2.

rove

(rəʊv)
vb
1. to wander about (a place) with no fixed direction; roam
2. (intr) (of the eyes) to look around; wander
3. have a roving eye to show a widespread amorous interest in the opposite sex
4. (Australian Rules Football) (intr) Australian rules football to play as a rover
n
the act of roving
[C15 roven (in archery) to shoot at a target chosen at random (C16: to wander, stray), from Scandinavian; compare Icelandic rāfa to wander]

rove

(rəʊv)
vb
(Textiles) (tr) to pull out and twist (fibres of wool, cotton, etc) lightly, as before spinning or in carding
n
(Textiles) wool, cotton, etc, thus prepared
[C18: of obscure origin]

rove

(rəʊv)
n
a metal plate through which a rivet is passed and then clenched over
[C15: from Scandinavian; compare Icelandic ro]

rove

(rəʊv)
vb
(Nautical Terms) a past tense and past participle of reeve2

rove1

(roʊv)

v. roved, rov•ing,
n. v.i.
1. to wander about without definite destination; move here and there at random, esp. over a wide area.
v.t.
2. to wander over or through; traverse.
n.
3. an act of roving.
[1490–1500; orig., to shoot at a random target]

rove2

(roʊv)

v.
a pt. and pp. of reeve 2.

rove3

(roʊv)

v.t. roved, rov•ing.
to form (slivers of wool, cotton, etc.) into slightly twisted strands in a preparatory process of spinning.
[1780–90; of obscure orig.]

rove


Past participle: roved
Gerund: roving

Imperative
rove
rove
Present
I rove
you rove
he/she/it roves
we rove
you rove
they rove
Preterite
I roved
you roved
he/she/it roved
we roved
you roved
they roved
Present Continuous
I am roving
you are roving
he/she/it is roving
we are roving
you are roving
they are roving
Present Perfect
I have roved
you have roved
he/she/it has roved
we have roved
you have roved
they have roved
Past Continuous
I was roving
you were roving
he/she/it was roving
we were roving
you were roving
they were roving
Past Perfect
I had roved
you had roved
he/she/it had roved
we had roved
you had roved
they had roved
Future
I will rove
you will rove
he/she/it will rove
we will rove
you will rove
they will rove
Future Perfect
I will have roved
you will have roved
he/she/it will have roved
we will have roved
you will have roved
they will have roved
Future Continuous
I will be roving
you will be roving
he/she/it will be roving
we will be roving
you will be roving
they will be roving
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been roving
you have been roving
he/she/it has been roving
we have been roving
you have been roving
they have been roving
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been roving
you will have been roving
he/she/it will have been roving
we will have been roving
you will have been roving
they will have been roving
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been roving
you had been roving
he/she/it had been roving
we had been roving
you had been roving
they had been roving
Conditional
I would rove
you would rove
he/she/it would rove
we would rove
you would rove
they would rove
Past Conditional
I would have roved
you would have roved
he/she/it would have roved
we would have roved
you would have roved
they would have roved
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.rove - move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employmentrove - move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment; "The gypsies roamed the woods"; "roving vagabonds"; "the wandering Jew"; "The cattle roam across the prairie"; "the laborers drift from one town to the next"; "They rolled from town to town"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
maunder - wander aimlessly
gad, gallivant, jazz around - wander aimlessly in search of pleasure
drift, err, stray - wander from a direct course or at random; "The child strayed from the path and her parents lost sight of her"; "don't drift from the set course"
wander - go via an indirect route or at no set pace; "After dinner, we wandered into town"

rove

verb wander, range, cruise, drift, stroll, stray, roam, ramble, meander, traipse (informal), go walkabout (Austral.), gallivant, gad about, stravaig (Scot. & Northern English dialect) roving about the town in the dead of night

rove

verb
To move about at random, especially over a wide area:
Translations
يَطوف، يَجول
toulat se
strejfe
barangol
ráfa
klajojantis
klaiņotklejot
aylak aylak dolaşmakbaşıboş gezinmek

rove

[rəʊv]
A. VTvagar or errar por, recorrer
B. VIvagar, errar
his eye roved over the roomrecorrió la habitación con la vista

rove

[ˈrəʊv]
vt [+ area, streets] → sillonner; [+ world] → sillonner
vi [eyes]
Agnew's eyes roved, taking everything in → Agnew promenait le regard, sans perdre le moindre détail.
rove about
rove around vt fus [+ place] [person] → sillonner; [eyes] → parcourirroving reporter nreporter m volant

rove

vi (person)umherwandern or -ziehen; (eyes)umherwandern or -schweifen; to rove over something (eyes)über etw (acc)schweifen or wandern
vt countryside, streetswandern or ziehen durch, durchwandern or -ziehen

rove

(rəuv) verb
to wander; to roam. He roved (through) the streets.
ˈrover noun
ˈroving adjective
a roving band of robbers.
References in classic literature ?
Now, mine continually rove away; when I should be listening to Miss Scatcherd, and collecting all she says with assiduity, often I lose the very sound of her voice; I fall into a sort of dream.
In the Eastern story, the heavy slab that was to fall on the bed of state in the flush of conquest was slowly wrought out of the quarry, the tunnel for the rope to hold it in its place was slowly carried through the leagues of rock, the slab was slowly raised and fitted in the roof, the rope was rove to it and slowly taken through the miles of hollow to the great iron ring.
She was too childish and simple for her imagination to rove into questions about her unknown father; for a long while it did not even occur to her that she must have had a father; and the first time that the idea of her mother having had a husband presented itself to her, was when Silas showed her the wedding-ring which had been taken from the wasted finger, and had been carefully preserved by him in a little lackered box shaped like a shoe.
When ADAM thus to EVE: Fair Consort, th' hour Of night, and all things now retir'd to rest Mind us of like repose, since God hath set Labour and rest, as day and night to men Successive, and the timely dew of sleep Now falling with soft slumbrous weight inclines Our eye-lids; other Creatures all day long Rove idle unimploid, and less need rest; Man hath his daily work of body or mind Appointed, which declares his Dignitie, And the regard of Heav'n on all his waies; While other Animals unactive range, And of thir doings God takes no account.
I am even surprised myself when I look back, but evidently it was my fate to rove, and after a year of repose I prepared to make a sixth voyage, regardless of the entreaties of my friends and relations, who did all they could to keep me at home.
Adventures seeking thou dost rove, To others bringing woe; Thou scatterest wounds, but, ah, the balm To heal them dost withhold!
Young imaginations, essentially eager and courageous, like to rove upon these fine living sheets of flesh.
I had at least two friends on Mars; a young woman who watched over me with motherly solicitude, and a dumb brute which, as I later came to know, held in its poor ugly carcass more love, more loyalty, more gratitude than could have been found in the entire five million green Martians who rove the deserted cities and dead sea bottoms of Mars.
responded the steward: “ I say that, if that there net is foul, the devil is in the lake in the shape of a fish, for I cast it as far as ever rigging was rove over the quarter-deck of a flag-ship.
Danny, in his big boots, trotted rather than climbed up the main rigging (this consumed Harvey with envy), hitched himself around the reeling crosstrees, and let his eye rove till it caught the tiny black buoy-flag on the shoulder of a mile-away swell.
He stood head-on eyeing us as we approached him, for we had found it a waste of time to attempt to escape the perpetual bestial rage which seems to possess these demon creatures, who rove the dismal north attacking every living thing that comes within the scope of their far-seeing eyes.
About the walled city the red man saw a huge encampment of the green warriors of the dead sea-bottoms, and as he let his eyes rove carefully over the city he realized that here was no deserted metropolis of a dead past.