rowed


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Related to rowed: rode, beet, foal

row 1

 (rō)
n.
1. A series of objects placed next to each other, usually in a straight line.
2. A succession without a break or gap in time: won the title for three years in a row.
3. A line of adjacent seats, as in a theater, auditorium, or classroom.
4. A continuous line of buildings along a street.
tr.v. rowed, row·ing, rows
To place in a row.
Idiom:
a tough row to hoe Informal
A difficult situation to endure.

[Middle English, from Old English rāw.]

row 2

 (rō)
v. rowed, row·ing, rows
v.intr. Nautical
To use an oar or pair of oars in propelling a boat, typically by facing the stern and pulling the oar handle toward oneself, using an oarlock as a fulcrum to push the blade backward through the water repeatedly.
v.tr.
1. Nautical
a. To propel (a boat) with oars.
b. To carry in or on a boat propelled by oars.
c. To use (a specified number of oars or people deploying them).
2. To propel or convey in a manner resembling rowing of a boat.
3. Sports
a. To pull (an oar) as part of a racing crew.
b. To race against by rowing.
n. Nautical
1.
a. The act or an instance of rowing.
b. A shift at the oars of a boat.
2. A trip or an excursion in a rowboat.

[Middle English rowen, from Old English rōwan; see erə- in Indo-European roots.]

row′er n.

row 3

 (rou)
n.
1. A noisy or quarrel or disturbance.
2. A loud noise.
intr.v. rowed, row·ing, rows
To take part in a noisy quarrel or disturbance.

[Origin unknown.]
References in classic literature ?
The numerous islands rested on the bosom of the Horican, some low and sunken, as if embedded in the waters, and others appearing to hover about the element, in little hillocks of green velvet; among which the fishermen of the beleaguering army peacefully rowed their skiffs, or floated at rest on the glassy mirror in quiet pursuit of their employment.
He was rowed out to sea every morning, and took his bath luxuriously in the deep blue water.
The night had fallen on the Kentish hills when we were rowed ashore - and fallen darkly upon me.
The boat had returned, and his guard were ready, so we followed him to the landing-place made of rough stakes and stones, and saw him put into the boat, which was rowed by a crew of convicts like himself.
We rowed, by my computation, about three leagues, till we were able to work no longer, being already spent with labour while we were in the ship.
He rowed with a quick, powerful stroke; and his eyes, under the mask, never left me.
There were no waves, so I broke off the branch of a tree, and dragging it down to the waters edge, sat across it, while, using two sticks for oars, I rowed myself towards the ship.
When they came to the great lake they rowed across, and when they reached the three sharp swords they sat on the plough-wheel, and on the glassy mountain they stuck the three needles in.