rubicund


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Related to rubicund: antimacassar, ruddiness, rutilant

ru·bi·cund

 (ro͞o′bĭ-kənd)
adj.
Inclined to a healthy rosiness; ruddy.

[Latin rubicundus; see reudh- in Indo-European roots.]

ru′bi·cun′di·ty (-kŭn′dĭ-tē) n.

rubicund

(ˈruːbɪkənd)
adj
(Colours) of a reddish colour; ruddy; rosy
[C16: from Latin rubicundus, from rubēre to be ruddy, from ruber red]
rubicundity n

ru•bi•cund

(ˈru bɪˌkʌnd)

adj.
red or reddish; ruddy.
[1495–1505; < Latin rubicundus, akin to ruber red]
ru`bi•cun′di•ty, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.rubicund - inclined to a healthy reddish color often associated with outdoor life; "a ruddy complexion"; "Santa's rubicund cheeks"; "a fresh and sanguine complexion"
healthy - having or indicating good health in body or mind; free from infirmity or disease; "a rosy healthy baby"; "staying fit and healthy"

rubicund

adjective
Of a healthy reddish color:
Translations

rubicund

[ˈruːbɪkənd] ADJrubicundo

rubicund

adjrot
References in classic literature ?
He soon returned, greatly improved in appearance; but so rubicund, that I couldn't help thinking his face had this in common with the lobsters, crabs, and crawfish, - that it went into the hot water very black, and came out very red.
This was the time for Wemmick to produce a little kettle, a tray of glasses, and a black bottle with a porcelain-topped cork, representing some clerical dignitary of a rubicund and social aspect.
Scarce had the rubicund Apollo spread o'er the face of the broad spacious earth the golden threads of his bright hair, scarce had the little birds of painted plumage attuned their notes to hail with dulcet and mellifluous harmony the coming of the rosy Dawn, that, deserting the soft couch of her jealous spouse, was appearing to mortals at the gates and balconies of the Manchegan horizon, when the renowned knight Don Quixote of La Mancha, quitting the lazy down, mounted his celebrated steed Rocinante and began to traverse the ancient and famous Campo de Montiel;'" which in fact he was actually traversing.
His eyes were blue, his complexion rubicund, his figure almost portly and well-built, his body muscular, and his physical powers fully developed by the exercises of his younger days.
Raoul had been there about ten minutes, during five of which he was lost in reverie, when there appeared within the circle comprised in his rolling gaze a man with a rubicund face, who, with a napkin around his body, another under his arm, and a white cap upon his head, approached him, holding paper, pen and ink in hand.
Please your honor," answered the drum-major, whose rubicund visage had lost all its color, "the fault is none of mine.
When first pronounced by your rubicund lips, it thrilled on my amazed senses like a beacon of light--"
This was a woman, too, and, moreover, an old woman, and as fat and as rubicund as Madame Pelet was meagre and yellow; her attire was likewise very fine, and spring flowers of different hues circled in a bright wreath the crown of her violet-coloured velvet bonnet.
Again, he assaulted a man of rubicund visage, and told him that few bosom serpents had more of the devil in them than those that breed in the vats of a distillery.
The dominant figure, both because he was bigger in all three dimensions, and because he sat centrally in the length of the table, facing me, was a tall, fat man dressed completely in black, with a rubicund, even apoplectic visage, but a rather bald and rather bothered brow.
So the throng moved on, until at the very gate it was brought to a stand by a wondrously fat man, who came darting forth from the town with rage in every feature of his rubicund face.
He was a tall man of middle age, with two goggle eyes whereof one was a fixture, a rubicund nose, a cadaverous face, and a suit of clothes (if the term be allowable when they suited him not at all) much the worse for wear, very much too small, and placed upon such a short allowance of buttons that it was marvellous how he contrived to keep them on.