rubricism

rubricism

a tenacious adherence to rules of behavior or thought; formulism. — rubrician, n.
See also: Attitudes
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At the extreme end of the spectrum, the study of the liturgy alone is reduced to mere aestheticism or rubricism, while the exclusive focus on social justice can become influenced solely by ideology instead of authentic charity.
The strict and detailed rubricism of the preconciliar rite, including the preservation of actions that had lost their functional purpose like the carrying and holding of the paten, wordlessly enacted a message of timelessness, of a changeless rite that goes on forever.
Rembert Weakland, then archbishop of Milwaukee, wrote what must now be seen as a prophetic article in America magazine in 1999 that warned of a creeping rubricism and movement to reinterpret Vatican II to assure validity and orthodoxy.
this work serves to remind us that the preconciliar rubricism has in some places been replaced by a postconciliar preoccupation with the elements which liturgy uses to accomplish "the work of our redemption.
That the new liturgical directives smack of a return to clericalism and rubricism in a church where Rome and "many bishops -- especially the younger ones -- are afraid of the laity's role in taking ownership of the church";
He had worked as hard as any priest for a church that is still stuck in rigidity, rubricism and fear of the laity.
I fear the restorationist implementation that is characterizing the second post-conciliar generation will err on the side of rigidity, rubricism and a fear of the gifts of individuals, especially of the laity, and build their renewal more on reaction than on theological insights.