rude


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rude

 (ro͞od)
adj. rud·er, rud·est
1. Ill-mannered, discourteous, or insulting: was offended by his rude behavior.
2.
a. Undeveloped or uncivilized; primitive: a rude and savage land.
b. Crude, unfinished, or made with limited skill: a rude thatched hut.
c. In a natural, raw state: bales of rude cotton.
3. Unpleasantly forceful or harsh: faced rude winds; received a rude shock.
4. Chiefly British Vigorous or robust: in rude health.
5. Archaic Lacking education or refinement: "They were so rude and ignorant ... that very little could be learned from them" (Samuel Johnson).

[Middle English, from Old French, unrefined, harsh, from Latin rudis, in a natural state, crude, ignorant.]

rude′ly adv.
rude′ness n.

rude

(ruːd)
adj
1. insulting or uncivil; discourteous; impolite: he was rude about her hairstyle.
2. lacking refinement; coarse or uncouth
3. vulgar or obscene: a rude joke.
4. unexpected and unpleasant: a rude awakening to the facts of economic life.
5. roughly or crudely made: we made a rude shelter on the island.
6. rough or harsh in sound, appearance, or behaviour
7. humble or lowly
8. (prenominal) robust or sturdy: in rude health.
9. (prenominal) approximate or imprecise: a rude estimate.
[C14: via Old French from Latin rudis coarse, unformed]
ˈrudely adv
ˈrudeness, ˈrudery n

rude

(rud)

adj. rud•er, rud•est.
1. discourteous or impolite, esp. deliberately so: a rude reply.
2. without culture, learning, or refinement.
3. rough in manners or behavior; uncouth.
4. rough, harsh, or ungentle: a rude shock.
5. roughly built or made; crude: a rude cottage.
6. harsh to the ear: rude sounds.
7. lacking elegance; of a primitive simplicity: a rude design.
8. robust, sturdy, or vigorous.
[1300–50; Middle English rude, ruide (< Old French) < Latin rudis]
rude′ly, adv.
rude′ness, n.
syn: See raw.

rude

  • cullion - A rude, mean-spirited person.
  • bronco - Spanish for "rough, rude."
  • erudite - Meaning "having or showing knowledge," it traces to Latin eruditus/erudire, "bring out of an untrained state," with the base being rudis, "untrained; rude."
  • hoyden - Can be applied to rude, ignorant people.

rude

If someone is rude to you, their behaviour towards you is not polite.

Gertrude felt she had been rude to Sylvia.
I was rather rude to a young nurse.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.rude - socially incorrect in behaviorrude - socially incorrect in behavior; "resentment flared at such an unmannered intrusion"
impolite - not polite
2.rude - (of persons) lacking in refinement or gracerude - (of persons) lacking in refinement or grace
unrefined - (used of persons and their behavior) not refined; uncouth; "how can a refined girl be drawn to such an unrefined man?"
3.rude - lacking civility or good mannersrude - lacking civility or good manners; "want nothing from you but to get away from your uncivil tongue"- Willa Cather
4.rude - (used especially of commodities) being unprocessed or manufactured using only simple or minimal processes; "natural yogurt"; "natural produce"; "raw wool"; "raw sugar"; "bales of rude cotton"
unprocessed - not altered from an original or natural state; "unprocessed commodities"
5.rude - belonging to an early stage of technical development; characterized by simplicity and (often) crudeness; "the crude weapons and rude agricultural implements of early man"; "primitive movies of the 1890s"; "primitive living conditions in the Appalachian mountains"
early - being or occurring at an early stage of development; "in an early stage"; "early forms of life"; "early man"; "an early computer"

rude

adjective
4. unpleasant, sharp, violent, sudden, harsh, startling, abrupt It came as a rude shock.
5. roughly-made, simple, rough, raw, crude, primitive, makeshift, rough-hewn, artless, inelegant, inartistic He had already constructed a rude cabin.
roughly-made even, finished, smooth, well-made, artful, shapely

rude

adjective
Translations
غَيْر مُهَذَّب ، وَقِح، فَظوَقِحوَقِح، قَليل الحَياء، بذيء
sprostýhrubý
grovuforskammetvulgær
epäkohteliaskarkearivo
nepristojan
durva
ósmekklegur, dónalegurruddalegur
失礼な
무례한
neķītrsnepiedienīgsnepieklājīgs
nevljudenprostaški
oartig
หยาบคาย
bất lịch sự

rude

[ruːd] ADJ (ruder (compar) (rudest (superl)))
1. (= impolite) [person] → grosero, maleducado; [remark] → grosero
to be rude to sbser grosero con algn
it's rude to staremirar fijamente es de mala educación
it was rude of you to ignore himignorarlo fue una grosería por tu parte
he was rude about her new dresshizo comentarios poco halagüeños respecto a su vestido nuevo
how rude!¡qué poca educación!¡qué grosero!
2. (= indecent) [gesture] → grosero, obsceno; [joke, song] → verde, colorado (LAm)
a rude worduna groseríauna mala palabra
3. (liter) (= primitive) [shelter, table] → tosco, rudimentario; [tool, device, implement] → burdo, rudimentario
4. (liter) (= unexpected and unpleasant) a rude awakeninguna sorpresa muy desagradable
a rude shockun golpe inesperado
5. (liter) (= vigorous) to be in rude healthgozar de muy buena salud, estar más sano que un roble

rude

[ˈruːd] adj
(= impolite) [person, behaviour] → impoli(e); [remark] → déplacé(e)
He made rude remarks about me → Il a fait des remarques déplacées à mon sujet.
it's rude to ... → c'est impoli de ...
It's rude to interrupt → C'est impoli de couper la parole aux gens.
to be rude to sb → être impoli avec qn
He was very rude to me → Il a été très impoli avec moi.
[word, manners] → déplacé(e)
(= vulgar) [jokes, stories, gesture, sign] → grossier/ière
a rude joke → une plaisanterie grossière
a rude word → un gros mot
(= abrupt) [shock] → rude before n
a rude awakening → un rude réveil
(= basic) → grossier/ière
to be in rude health → avoir une santé de fer

rude

adj (+er)
(= impolite, bad-mannered)unhöflich; (stronger) → unverschämt; (= rough, uncouth)grob; to be rude to somebodyunhöflich zu jdm sein; it’s rude to starees gehört sich nicht, Leute anzustarren, man starrt andere Leute nicht an; don’t be so rude!so was sagt man/tut man nicht!; talk about rude!der/die hat vielleicht einen Ton am Leib! (inf)
(= obscene, dirty)unanständig, unflätig (geh); to make a rude gesture at somebodyjdm gegenüber eine anstößige Geste machen; to make a rude noise (euph)pup(s)en (inf)
(= harsh) shockbös, hart; blast, weatherwüst, rau; reminderunsanft ? awakening
(liter, = crude, primitive) → primitiv; fareeinfach, schlicht
(liter: = vigorous) strengthgewaltig; he is in rude health/strengther strotzt (nur so) vor Gesundheit/Kraft

rude

[ruːd] adj (-r (comp) (-st (superl)))
a. (impolite) → villano/a, maleducato/a; (indecent) → indecente, volgare
to be rude to sb → essere maleducato con qn
it's rude to talk with your mouth full → è cattiva educazione parlare con la bocca piena
a rude word → una parolaccia
b. a rude awakening (fig) → una doccia fredda
to be in rude health → essere in ottima salute
c. (liter) (primitive) → rudimentale

rude

(ruːd) adjective
1. not polite; showing bad manners. rude behaviour.
2. vulgar; indecent. rude pictures.
ˈrudely adverb
ˈrudeness noun

rude

وَقِح sprostý uforskammet unverschämt αγενής maleducado epäkohtelias grossier nepristojan maleducato 失礼な 무례한 ongemanierd uhøflig nieuprzejmy grosseiro, rude грубый oartig หยาบคาย kaba bất lịch sự 粗鲁的
References in classic literature ?
The chattering crowd, with their rude jokes cried out from wagon to wagon, sometimes irritated him sharply.
The rude path, which originally formed their line of communication, had been widened for the passage of wagons; so that the distance which had been traveled by the son of the forest in two hours, might easily be effected by a detachment of troops, with their necessary baggage, between the rising and setting of a summer sun.
The flour pan in which their daily bread was mixed stood on the rude table side by side with the "prospecting pans," half full of gold washed up from their morning's work; the front windows of the newer tenements looked upon the one single thoroughfare, but the back door opened upon the uncleared wilderness, still haunted by the misshapen bulk of bear or the nightly gliding of catamount.
In the growth of the town, however, after some thirty or forty years, the site covered by this rude hovel had become exceedingly desirable in the eyes of a prominent and powerful personage, who asserted plausible claims to the proprietorship of this and a large adjacent tract of land, on the strength of a grant from the legislature.
It was a folly, with the materiality of this daily life pressing so intrusively upon me, to attempt to fling myself back into another age, or to insist on creating the semblance of a world out of airy matter, when, at every moment, the impalpable beauty of my soap-bubble was broken by the rude contact of some actual circumstance.
Projecting from the further angle of the room stands a dark-looking den --the bar-- a rude attempt at a right whale's head.
Trailing wearily behind a rude wagon, and over a ruder road, Tom and his associates faced onward.
They and the women, as a rule, wore a coarse tow-linen robe that came well below the knee, and a rude sort of sandal, and many wore an iron collar.
And then of course the antelopes--although they were too shy and timid to be rude to the Doctor like the lion--THEY pawed the ground, and smiled foolishly, and said they had never been nurses before.
The other appointments of the mansion partook of the rude simplicity of the Saxon period, which Cedric piqued himself upon maintaining.
Their buildings, although very rude and simple, are not inconvenient, but well contrived to defend them from all injuries of and heat.
He was cordially welcomed by the goatherds, and Sancho, having as best he could put up Rocinante and the ass, drew towards the fragrance that came from some pieces of salted goat simmering in a pot on the fire; and though he would have liked at once to try if they were ready to be transferred from the pot to the stomach, he refrained from doing so as the goatherds removed them from the fire, and laying sheepskins on the ground, quickly spread their rude table, and with signs of hearty good-will invited them both to share what they had.