rudeness


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rude

 (ro͞od)
adj. rud·er, rud·est
1. Ill-mannered, discourteous, or insulting: was offended by his rude behavior.
2.
a. Undeveloped or uncivilized; primitive: a rude and savage land.
b. Crude, unfinished, or made with limited skill: a rude thatched hut.
c. In a natural, raw state: bales of rude cotton.
3. Unpleasantly forceful or harsh: faced rude winds; received a rude shock.
4. Chiefly British Vigorous or robust: in rude health.
5. Archaic Lacking education or refinement: "They were so rude and ignorant ... that very little could be learned from them" (Samuel Johnson).

[Middle English, from Old French, unrefined, harsh, from Latin rudis, in a natural state, crude, ignorant.]

rude′ly adv.
rude′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rudeness - a manner that is rude and insulting
personal manner, manner - a way of acting or behaving
boorishness - the manner of a rude or insensitive person
impoliteness - a discourteous manner that ignores accepted social usage
ungraciousness - an offensive lack of good manners
incivility - deliberate discourtesy
abruptness, brusqueness, curtness, gruffness, shortness - an abrupt discourteous manner
contempt, disrespect - a manner that is generally disrespectful and contemptuous
cheekiness, insolence, impertinence, impudence, crust, freshness, gall - the trait of being rude and impertinent; inclined to take liberties
2.rudeness - a wild or unrefined state
natural state, state of nature, wild - a wild primitive state untouched by civilization; "he lived in the wild"; "they collected mushrooms in the wild"

rudeness

rudeness

noun
Translations
وَقاحَه
hrubost
grovhed
otrombaság
ruddaskapur
grobost
kabalıkterbiyesizlik

rudeness

[ˈruːdnɪs] N
1. (= impoliteness) [of person, behaviour] → grosería f, falta f de educación; [of reply, remark] → falta f de educación
2. (= obscenity) → grosería f
3. (= primitiveness) [of shelter, table] → tosquedad f, lo rudimentario; [of tool, device, implement] → lo burdo, lo rudimentario

rudeness

[ˈruːdnɪs] nimpolitesse f

rudeness

n
(= impoliteness)Unhöflichkeit f; (stronger) → Unverschämtheit f; (= roughness, uncouthness)Grobheit f
(= obscenity)Unanständigkeit f, → Unflätigkeit f (geh)
(= harshness: of shock) → Härte f

rudeness

[ˈruːdnɪs] n (impoliteness) → villania, maleducazione f; (indecency) → indecenza, volgarità

rude

(ruːd) adjective
1. not polite; showing bad manners. rude behaviour.
2. vulgar; indecent. rude pictures.
ˈrudely adverb
ˈrudeness noun
References in classic literature ?
Please forgive my rudeness, and come and dance with me.
As they did not mix with the immigrant women--Miss Jessie's good-natured intrusion into one of their half-nomadic camps one day having been met with rudeness and suspicion--they gradually fell into the way of trusting the responsibility of new acquaintances to the hands of their original hosts, and of consulting them in the matter of local recreation.
Phoebe was on the point of retreating, but turned back, with some hesitation; for she did not exactly comprehend his manner, although, on better observation, its feature seemed rather to be lack of ceremony than any approach to offensive rudeness.
So -- with a mightier struggle than he had yet sustained -- he held his Geneva cloak before his face, and hurried onward, making no sign of recognition, and leaving the young sister to digest his rudeness as she might.
A certain superciliousness of look, coolness of manner, nonchalance of tone, express fully their sentiments on the point, without committing them by any positive rudeness in word or deed.
I cried, thinking him deaf, yet highly disgusted at his rudeness.
The man's rudeness merely annoyed me for the moment.
But Miss Nancy was not ashamed of that, for even while she was dressing she narrated to her aunt how she and Priscilla had packed their boxes yesterday, because this morning was baking morning, and since they were leaving home, it was desirable to make a good supply of meat-pies for the kitchen; and as she concluded this judicious remark, she turned to the Miss Gunns that she might not commit the rudeness of not including them in the conversation.
I have always thought, that one of the most curious and valuable objects of antiquaries has been to trace the progress of society, by the efforts made in early ages to improve the rudeness of their first expedients, until they either approach excellence, or, as is more frequently the case, are supplied by new and fundamental discoveries, which supersede both the earlier and ruder system, and the improvements which have been ingrafted upon it.
This piece of rudeness was more than Alice could bear: she got up in great disgust, and walked off; the Dormouse fell asleep instantly, and neither of the others took the least notice of her going, though she looked back once or twice, half hoping that they would call after her: the last time she saw them, they were trying to put the Dormouse into the teapot.
Oh, madam," returned he, "you have already given me too much, and I fear I may have been guilty of rudeness in not taking my departure at once.
Losing patience at what appeared to me intolerable rudeness, I brought my mouth into a position full in front of her mouth so as to intercept her motion, and loudly repeated my question, "Woman, what signifies this concourse, and this strange and confused chirping, and this monotonous motion to and fro in one and the same Straight Line?