rudiment


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ru·di·ment

 (ro͞o′də-mənt)
n.
1. often rudiments
a. A fundamental element, principle, or skill, as of a field of learning: the rudiments of calculus.
b. Something in an incipient or undeveloped form: the rudiments of social behavior in children; the rudiments of a plan of action.
2. Biology An imperfectly or incompletely developed organ or part.

[Latin rudīmentum, from rudis, rough, unformed.]

ru′di·men′tal (-mĕn′tl) adj.

rudiment

(ˈruːdɪmənt)
n
1. (often plural) the first principles or elementary stages of a subject
2. (often plural) a partially developed version of something
3. (Biology) biology an organ or part in its earliest recognizable form, esp one in an embryonic or vestigial state
[C16: from Latin rudīmentum a beginning, from rudis unformed; see rude]

ru•di•ment

(ˈru də mənt)

n.
1. Usu., rudiments.
a. the elements or first principles of a subject: the rudiments of grammar.
b. a mere beginning, first slight appearance, or undeveloped or imperfect form of something: the rudiments of a plan.
2. an incompletely developed organ or part.
[1540–50; < Latin rudīmentum early training, initial stage]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rudiment - the elementary stages of any subject (usually plural)rudiment - the elementary stages of any subject (usually plural); "he mastered only the rudiments of geometry"
basic principle, fundamental principle, fundamentals, basics, bedrock - principles from which other truths can be derived; "first you must learn the fundamentals"; "let's get down to basics"
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
2.rudiment - the remains of a body part that was functional at an earlier stage of life; "Meckel's diverticulum is the rudiment of the embryonic yolk sac"
body part - any part of an organism such as an organ or extremity

rudiment

noun
1. A fundamental principle or underlying concept.Often used in plural:
2. A fundamental irreducible constituent of a whole.Often used in plural:
Translations

rudiment

[ˈruːdɪmənt] N (Bio) → rudimento m rudimentsrudimentos mpl, primeras nociones fpl

ru·di·ment

n. rudimento.
1. órgano parcialmente desarrollado;
2. órgano o parte que ha perdido total o parcialmente su función anterior.
References in classic literature ?
Whatever may be the carved and embroidered envelope of a cathedral, one always finds beneath it--in the state of a germ, and of a rudiment at the least--the Roman basilica.
This is the case with the male Ibla, and in a truly extraordinary manner with the Proteolepas: for the carapace in all other cirripedes consists of the three highly-important anterior segments of the head enormously developed, and furnished with great nerves and muscles; but in the parasitic and protected Proteolepas, the whole anterior part of the head is reduced to the merest rudiment attached to the bases of the prehensile antennae.
Pray tell me anything new that has happened to a man anywhere on this globe" -- and he reads it over his coffee and rolls, that a man has had his eyes gouged out this morning on the Wachito River; never dreaming the while that he lives in the dark unfathomed mammoth cave of this world, and has but the rudiment of an eye himself.
He don't amount to shucks, as a magician; knows some of the old common tricks, but has never got beyond the rudiments, and never will.
I see in a second that what I had mistook for profanity in the mines was only just the rudiments, as you may say.
Frank was praised, as a quiet, gentleman-like, interesting lad -but he was also reported to be rather slow at acquiring the rudiments of engineering science.
He advised my attending certain places in London, for the acquisition of such mere rudiments as I wanted, and my investing him with the functions of explainer and director of all my studies.
You're less of a fool than many, take you all round; but you don't appear to me to have the rudiments of a notion of the rules of health.
Upon these, and the like reasonings, their opinion is, that parents are the last of all others to be trusted with the education of their own children; and therefore they have in every town public nurseries, where all parents, except cottagers and labourers, are obliged to send their infants of both sexes to be reared and educated, when they come to the age of twenty moons, at which time they are supposed to have some rudiments of docility.
He did not go so far as to scrape the seams with glass,--a refinement invented by the Prince of Wales; but he did practice the rudiments of English elegance with a personal satisfaction little understood by the people of Alencon.
Their bodies were smaller and lighter in color, and their fingers and toes bore the rudiments of nails, which were entirely lacking among the males.
Slowly she learned the rudiments of the only common medium of thought exchange which her companions possessed--the language of the great apes.