ruffle

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ruf·fle 1

 (rŭf′əl)
n.
1. A strip of frilled or closely pleated fabric used for trimming or decoration.
2. A ruff on a bird.
3. An irregularity or a slight disturbance of a surface: the ruffle on the lake.
4. A beating or rustling sound: the ruffle of drums in the distance; the ruffle of a skirt on the floor.
v. ruf·fled, ruf·fling, ruf·fles
v.tr.
1. To disturb the smoothness or regularity of; ripple: The wind ruffled the water.
2.
a. To pleat or gather (fabric) into a ruffle.
b. To put a ruffle on (a garment, for example).
3. To erect (the feathers). Used of birds.
4. To discompose or annoy; fluster: a book that is bound to ruffle some people.
5. To flip through (the pages of a book).
6. To shuffle (cards).
v.intr.
1. To become irregular or rough: His hair ruffled in the wind.
2. To become annoyed or flustered: What teacher doesn't ruffle when students act up in class?
3.
a. To flip through the pages of a book: ruffled through the book until I found the picture.
b. To search for something in a container: ruffled in her bag looking for the keys.
4. To make a beating or rustling sound.

[From Middle English ruffelen, to roughen.]

ruf·fle 2

 (rŭf′əl)
n.
A low continuous beating of a drum that is not as loud as a roll. Also called ruff4.
tr.v. ruf·fled, ruf·fling, ruf·fles
To beat a ruffle on (a drum).

[Probably from frequentative of ruff.]

ruf·fle 3

 (rŭf′əl)
intr.v. ruf·fled, ruf·fling, ruf·fles
Obsolete To behave arrogantly or roughly; swagger.

[Middle English ruffelen, to quarrel.]

ruf′fler n.

ruffle

(ˈrʌfəl)
vb
1. to make, be, or become irregular or rumpled: to ruffle a child's hair; a breeze ruffling the water.
2. to annoy, irritate, or be annoyed or irritated
3. (Knitting & Sewing) (tr) to make into a ruffle; pleat
4. (Zoology) (of a bird) to erect (its feathers) in anger, display, etc
5. (tr) to flick (cards, pages, etc) rapidly with the fingers
n
6. an irregular or disturbed surface
7. (Knitting & Sewing) a strip of pleated material used for decoration or as a trim
8. (Zoology) zoology another name for ruff12
9. annoyance or irritation
[C13: of Germanic origin; compare Middle Low German ruffelen to crumple, Old Norse hrufla to scratch]

ruffle

(ˈrʌfəl)
n
(Music, other) a low continuous drumbeat
vb
(Music, other) (tr) to beat (a drum) with a low repetitive beat
[C18: from earlier ruff, of imitative origin]

ruffle

(ˈrʌfəl)
vb
(intr) archaic to behave riotously or arrogantly; swagger
[C15: of obscure origin]

ruf•fle1

(ˈrʌf əl)

v. -fled, -fling,
n. v.t.
1. to destroy the smoothness or evenness of.
2. to erect (the feathers), as a bird in anger.
3. to disturb, vex, or irritate.
4. to turn (pages) rapidly.
5. to pass (cards) through the fingers rapidly in shuffling.
6. to draw up (cloth, lace, etc.) into a ruffle by gathering along one edge.
v.i.
7. to be or become ruffled.
n.
8. a break in the evenness of a surface.
9. a strip of cloth, lace, etc., gathered along one edge; used as a trimming, as on curtains.
10. something resembling this, as the ruff of a bird.
11. disturbance or vexation; irritation.
[1250–1300; ruffelen (v.); c. Low German ruffelen to crumple]
ruf′fly, adj.

ruf•fle2

(ˈrʌf əl)

n., v. -fled, -fling. n.
1. a low, continuous beating of a drum.
v.t.
2. to beat (a drum) in this manner.
[1715–25; archaic ruff in same sense (perhaps imitative) + -le]

ruffle


Past participle: ruffled
Gerund: ruffling

Imperative
ruffle
ruffle
Present
I ruffle
you ruffle
he/she/it ruffles
we ruffle
you ruffle
they ruffle
Preterite
I ruffled
you ruffled
he/she/it ruffled
we ruffled
you ruffled
they ruffled
Present Continuous
I am ruffling
you are ruffling
he/she/it is ruffling
we are ruffling
you are ruffling
they are ruffling
Present Perfect
I have ruffled
you have ruffled
he/she/it has ruffled
we have ruffled
you have ruffled
they have ruffled
Past Continuous
I was ruffling
you were ruffling
he/she/it was ruffling
we were ruffling
you were ruffling
they were ruffling
Past Perfect
I had ruffled
you had ruffled
he/she/it had ruffled
we had ruffled
you had ruffled
they had ruffled
Future
I will ruffle
you will ruffle
he/she/it will ruffle
we will ruffle
you will ruffle
they will ruffle
Future Perfect
I will have ruffled
you will have ruffled
he/she/it will have ruffled
we will have ruffled
you will have ruffled
they will have ruffled
Future Continuous
I will be ruffling
you will be ruffling
he/she/it will be ruffling
we will be ruffling
you will be ruffling
they will be ruffling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been ruffling
you have been ruffling
he/she/it has been ruffling
we have been ruffling
you have been ruffling
they have been ruffling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been ruffling
you will have been ruffling
he/she/it will have been ruffling
we will have been ruffling
you will have been ruffling
they will have been ruffling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been ruffling
you had been ruffling
he/she/it had been ruffling
we had been ruffling
you had been ruffling
they had been ruffling
Conditional
I would ruffle
you would ruffle
he/she/it would ruffle
we would ruffle
you would ruffle
they would ruffle
Past Conditional
I would have ruffled
you would have ruffled
he/she/it would have ruffled
we would have ruffled
you would have ruffled
they would have ruffled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ruffle - a strip of pleated material used as a decoration or a trimruffle - a strip of pleated material used as a decoration or a trim
adornment - a decoration of color or interest that is added to relieve plainness
gauffer, goffer - an ornamental frill made by pressing pleats
jabot - a ruffle on the front of a woman's blouse or a man's shirt
peplum - a flared ruffle attached to the waistline of a dress or jacket or blouse
2.ruffle - a high tight collarruffle - a high tight collar      
collar, neckband - a band that fits around the neck and is usually folded over
fraise - a ruff for the neck worn in the 16th century
3.ruffle - a noisy fightruffle - a noisy fight        
fighting, combat, fight, scrap - the act of fighting; any contest or struggle; "a fight broke out at the hockey game"; "there was fighting in the streets"; "the unhappy couple got into a terrible scrap"
Verb1.ruffle - stir up (water) so as to form ripplesruffle - stir up (water) so as to form ripples
flow, flux - move or progress freely as if in a stream; "The crowd flowed out of the stadium"
2.ruffle - trouble or vex; "ruffle somebody's composure"
annoy, devil, gravel, irritate, nark, rile, vex, nettle, rag, bother, chafe, get at, get to - cause annoyance in; disturb, especially by minor irritations; "Mosquitoes buzzing in my ear really bothers me"; "It irritates me that she never closes the door after she leaves"
3.ruffle - to walk with a lofty proud gait, often in an attempt to impress others; "He struts around like a rooster in a hen house"
walk - use one's feet to advance; advance by steps; "Walk, don't run!"; "We walked instead of driving"; "She walks with a slight limp"; "The patient cannot walk yet"; "Walk over to the cabinet"
4.ruffle - discompose; "This play is going to ruffle some people"; "She has a way of ruffling feathers among her colleagues"
fluster - cause to be nervous or upset
5.ruffle - twitch or flutter; "the paper flicked"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
6.ruffle - mix so as to make a random order or arrangementruffle - mix so as to make a random order or arrangement; "shuffle the cards"
manipulate - hold something in one's hands and move it
reshuffle - shuffle again; "So as to prevent cheating, he was asked to reshuffle the cards"
riffle - shuffle (playing cards) by separating the deck into two parts and riffling with the thumbs so the cards intermix
cut - divide a deck of cards at random into two parts to make selection difficult; "Wayne cut"; "She cut the deck for a long time"
7.ruffle - erect or fluff up; "the bird ruffled its feathers"
loosen - make less dense; "loosen the soil"
8.ruffle - disturb the smoothness ofruffle - disturb the smoothness of; "ruffle the surface of the water"
disarrange - destroy the arrangement or order of; "My son disarranged the papers on my desk"
9.ruffle - pleat or gather into a ruffle; "ruffle the curtain fabric"
fold, fold up, turn up - bend or lay so that one part covers the other; "fold up the newspaper"; "turn up your collar"

ruffle

verb
1. disarrange, disorder, wrinkle, mess up, rumple, tousle, derange, discompose, dishevel She let the wind ruffle her hair. ripple, riffle, roughen, make ripples in The evening breeze ruffled the pond.
2. annoy, worry, trouble, upset, confuse, stir, disturb, rattle (informal), irritate, put out, unsettle, shake up (informal), harass, hassle (informal), agitate, unnerve, disconcert, disquiet, nettle, vex, fluster, perturb, faze, peeve (informal) My refusal to let him ruffle me infuriated him.
annoy ease, comfort, calm, compose, soothe, console, appease, solace, mollify

ruffle

verb
1. To impair or destroy the composure of:
Informal: rattle.
2. To trouble the nerves or peace of mind of, especially by repeated vexations:
Idioms: get in one's hair, get on one's nerves, get under one's skin.
Translations
يُزْعِج، يُكَدِّر
načepýřitrozcuchat
pjuske op iruske op i
ÿfa
šiauštisutaršytitaršyti
sabužināt

ruffle

[ˈrʌfl]
A. Narruga f (Sew) → volante m fruncido; (= ripple) → rizo m
B. VT [+ surface of water] → agitar, rizar; [+ hair] → despeinar; [+ feathers] → erizar; [+ fabric] → fruncir; [+ bedclothes] → arrugar
nothing ruffles himno se altera por nada
she wasn't at all ruffledno se perturbó en lo más mínimo
to ruffle sb's feathersherir las susceptibilidades de algn
to smooth sb's ruffled feathersalisar las plumas erizadas de algn

ruffle

[ˈrʌfəl]
vt
[+ hair, feathers] → ébouriffer
to ruffle sb's feathers (= upset) → chiffonner qn
[+ clothes] → chiffonner
[+ water] → faire moutonner
(= unnerve) [+ person] → faire perdre son flegme à
n (on blouse, shirt, round neck)jabot m; (round cuff)manchette f

ruffle

n (on dress) → Rüsche f; (on water) → Kräuseln nt no pl
vt
(= disturb) hair, featherszerzausen; surface, waterkräuseln; bedspread, clothesverkrumpeln (inf); the bird ruffled (up) its feathersder Vogel plusterte sich auf
(fig: = upset, disturb) → aus der Ruhe bringen; (= annoy)verärgern, aufbringen; to ruffle somebody’s calmjdn aus der Ruhe bringen; to ruffle somebody’s feathersjdn aufregen

ruffle

[ˈrʌfl] vt (surface) → (far) increspare; (hair, feathers) → arruffare, scompigliare (fig) (person) → (far) agitare, turbare, (far) innervosire
nothing ruffles him → non si scompone mai

ruffle

(ˈrafl) verb
to make wrinkled or uneven, especially hair, feathers etc. The wind ruffled her hair; The bird ruffled its feathers in anger.
References in classic literature ?
She was dressed in pure white, with a fluffiness of ruffles that became her.
It used to be affirmed, that the dead shop-keeper, in a white wig, a faded velvet coat, an apron at his waist, and his ruffles carefully turned back from his wrists, might be seen through the chinks of the shutters, any night of the year, ransacking his till, or poring over the dingy pages of his day-book.
impetuously exclaimed Don Pedro, spilling his chicha upon his silvery ruffles.
Now she clothed the naked little creature in one of Thomas `a Becket's snowy, long baby gowns, with its bright blue bows and dainty flummery of ruffles.
We came to Richmond all too soon, and our destination there, was a house by the Green; a staid old house, where hoops and powder and patches, embroidered coats rolled stockings ruffles and swords, had had their court days many a time.
On the other hand, the stately form of the Norman appeared to dilate in magnitude, like that of the eagle, which ruffles up its plumage when about to pounce on its defenceless prey.
Delicate lace ruffles fell over the lean yellow hands that were so overladen with rings.
The truth is, I came to the gate, where some dozen or so of devils were playing tennis, all in breeches and doublets, with falling collars trimmed with Flemish bonelace, and ruffles of the same that served them for wristbands, with four fingers' breadth of the arms exposed to make their hands look longer; in their hands they held rackets of fire; but what amazed me still more was that books, apparently full of wind and rubbish, served them for tennis balls, a strange and marvellous thing; this, however, did not astonish me so much as to observe that, although with players it is usual for the winners to be glad and the losers sorry, there in that game all were growling, all were snarling, and all were cursing one another.
His red, rough hands, which have done many a good day's work with the hammer and adze, are half covered by the delicate lace ruffles at his wrists.
Louis knitted his brow, and twisted violently the lace of his ruffles.
He managed his gold-headed cane with an airy grace, peculiar to the fine gentlemen of the period; and, to give the highest possible finish to his equipment, he had lace ruffles at his wrist, of a most ethereal delicacy, sufficiently avouching how idle and aristocratic must be the hands which they half concealed.
It was usual for ladies who received in the evenings to wear what were called "simple dinner dresses": a close-fitting armour of whale-boned silk, slightly open in the neck, with lace ruffles filling in the crack, and tight sleeves with a flounce uncovering just enough wrist to show an Etruscan gold bracelet or a velvet band.