ruffling


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Related to ruffling: flounce, ruffling feathers

ruf·fle 1

 (rŭf′əl)
n.
1. A strip of frilled or closely pleated fabric used for trimming or decoration.
2. A ruff on a bird.
3. An irregularity or a slight disturbance of a surface: the ruffle on the lake.
4. A beating or rustling sound: the ruffle of drums in the distance; the ruffle of a skirt on the floor.
v. ruf·fled, ruf·fling, ruf·fles
v.tr.
1. To disturb the smoothness or regularity of; ripple: The wind ruffled the water.
2.
a. To pleat or gather (fabric) into a ruffle.
b. To put a ruffle on (a garment, for example).
3. To erect (the feathers). Used of birds.
4. To discompose or annoy; fluster: a book that is bound to ruffle some people.
5. To flip through (the pages of a book).
6. To shuffle (cards).
v.intr.
1. To become irregular or rough: His hair ruffled in the wind.
2. To become annoyed or flustered: What teacher doesn't ruffle when students act up in class?
3.
a. To flip through the pages of a book: ruffled through the book until I found the picture.
b. To search for something in a container: ruffled in her bag looking for the keys.
4. To make a beating or rustling sound.

[From Middle English ruffelen, to roughen.]

ruf·fle 2

 (rŭf′əl)
n.
A low continuous beating of a drum that is not as loud as a roll. Also called ruff4.
tr.v. ruf·fled, ruf·fling, ruf·fles
To beat a ruffle on (a drum).

[Probably from frequentative of ruff.]

ruf·fle 3

 (rŭf′əl)
intr.v. ruf·fled, ruf·fling, ruf·fles
Obsolete To behave arrogantly or roughly; swagger.

[Middle English ruffelen, to quarrel.]

ruf′fler n.

ruffling

(ˈrʌflɪŋ)
n
1. the act of unsettling or disturbing a person or his or her composure
2. (Zoology) the act or an instance of a bird erecting its feathers in anger, display, etc
References in classic literature ?
No lesser sense of the infant fowl's importance could have justified, even in a mother's eyes, the perseverance with which she watched over its safety, ruffling her small person to twice its proper size, and flying in everybody's face that so much as looked towards her hopeful progeny.
Edgar had a deep-rooted fear of ruffling her humour.
It looks it, for sure," said Martha, ruffling it up a little round her face.
Peggotty was so proud and overjoyed to see us, that he did not know what to say or do, but kept over and over again shaking hands with me, and then with Steerforth, and then with me, and then ruffling his shaggy hair all over his head, and laughing with such glee and triumph, that it was a treat to see him.