ruinous


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Related to ruinous: ruinous price

ru·in·ous

 (ro͞o′ə-nəs)
adj.
1. Causing or apt to cause ruin; destructive: a ruinous habit; a ruinous rivalry.
2. Falling to ruin; dilapidated or decayed.

ru′in·ous·ly adv.
ru′in·ous·ness n.

ruinous

(ˈruːɪnəs)
adj
causing, tending to cause, or characterized by ruin or destruction: a ruinous course of action.
ˈruinously adv
ˈruinousness n

ru•in•ous

(ˈru ə nəs)

adj.
1. bringing or tending to bring ruin; destructive; disastrous: a ruinous war.
2. fallen into ruin; dilapidated.
3. extremely expensive.
[1350–1400; Middle English ruynouse < Latin ruīnōsus=ruīn(a) ruin + -ōsus -ous]
ru′in•ous•ly, adv.
ru′in•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.ruinous - extremely harmful; bringing physical or financial ruin; "a catastrophic depression"; "catastrophic illness"; "a ruinous course of action"
harmful - causing or capable of causing harm; "too much sun is harmful to the skin"; "harmful effects of smoking"
2.ruinous - causing injury or blightruinous - causing injury or blight; especially affecting with sudden violence or plague or ruin; "the blasting effects of the intense cold on the budding fruit"; "the blasting force of the wind blowing sharp needles of sleet in our faces"; "a ruinous war"
destructive - causing destruction or much damage; "a policy that is destructive to the economy"; "destructive criticism"

ruinous

adjective
1. extravagant, crippling, outrageous, inflated, wasteful, extortionate, excessively high, immoderate the ruinous costs of the legal system
3. ruined, broken-down, derelict, ramshackle, dilapidated, in ruins, decrepit, tumbledown They passed by the ruinous building.

ruinous

adjective
2. Having the capability or effect of damaging irreparably:
3. Falling to ruin:
Translations

ruinous

[ˈruːɪnəs] ADJruinoso

ruinous

[ˈruːɪnəs] adjruineux/euse

ruinous

adj (financially) → ruinös; priceextrem; to be in a ruinous state or in ruinous condition (building) → verfallen or baufällig sein

ruinous

[ˈruːɪnəs] adj (expensive) → costoso/a
References in classic literature ?
One day, as he went prancing down a quiet street, he saw at the window of a ruinous castle the lovely face.
On either side extended a ruinous wooden fence of open lattice-work, through which could be seen a grassy yard, and, especially in the angles of the building, an enormous fertility of burdocks, with leaves, it is hardly an exaggeration to say, two or three feet long.
What is the ruinous discount which Mordecai, the broker, gets from poor Woebegone, the bankrupt, on a loan to keep Woebegone's family from starvation; what is that ruinous discount but a Fast-Fish?
This old stone tower was very massive -- and rather ruinous, too, for it was Roman, and four hundred years old.
It was getting crazy and ruinous now, from long neglect.
They saw a weed-grown, floorless room, unplastered, an ancient fireplace, va- cant windows, a ruinous staircase; and here, there, and everywhere hung ragged and abandoned cobwebs.
At the western extremity the remains of the monastery were in a less ruinous condition than at the eastern.
Houses in twos and threes pass by us, solitary farms, ruinous buildings, dye-works, tanneries, and the like, open country, avenues of leafless trees.
The old gentleman had been talking with Godfrey about the increasing poor-rate and the ruinous times, and had not heard the dialogue between his daughters.
Nor was his eare less peal'd With noises loud and ruinous (to compare Great things with small) then when BELLONA storms, With all her battering Engines bent to rase Som Capital City, or less then if this frame Of Heav'n were falling, and these Elements In mutinie had from her Axle torn The stedfast Earth.
It is the mere wantonness of insult,'' said one of the oldest and most important of Prince John's followers, Waldemar Fitzurse, ``and if your Grace attempt it, cannot but prove ruinous to your projects.
I could not forbear admiring at these odd appearances, both in town and country; and I made bold to desire my conductor, that he would be pleased to explain to me, what could be meant by so many busy heads, hands, and faces, both in the streets and the fields, because I did not discover any good effects they produced; but, on the contrary, I never knew a soil so unhappily cultivated, houses so ill contrived and so ruinous, or a people whose countenances and habit expressed so much misery and want.