rule


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Related to rule: Rule of 72, Rule of thirds, Rule britannia

rule

 (ro͞ol)
n.
1.
a. Governing power or its possession or use; authority.
b. The duration of such power.
2.
a. An authoritative, prescribed direction for conduct, especially one of the regulations governing procedure in a legislative body or a regulation observed by the players in a game, sport, or contest.
b. The body of regulations prescribed by the founder of a religious order for governing the conduct of its members.
3. A usual, customary, or generalized course of action or behavior: "The rule of life in the defense bar ordinarily is to go along and get along" (Scott Turow).
4. A generalized statement that describes what is true in most or all cases: In this office, hard work is the rule, not the exception.
5. Mathematics A standard method or procedure for solving a class of problems.
6. Law
a. A court decision serving as a precedent for subsequent cases: the Miranda rule.
b. A legal doctrine or principle.
c. A court order.
d. A minor regulation or law.
e. A statute or regulation governing the court process: rule of procedure; rule of evidence.
7. See ruler.
8. Printing A thin metal strip of various widths and designs, used to print borders or lines, as between columns.
v. ruled, rul·ing, rules
v.tr.
1. To exercise control, dominion, or direction over; govern: rule a kingdom.
2.
a. To have a powerful influence over; dominate: "Many found the lanky westerner naive, and supposed that he would be ruled by one of his more commanding cabinet officers" (William Marvel).
b. To be a preeminent or dominant factor in: "It was a place where ... middle-class life was ruled by a hankering for all things foreign" (Amitav Ghosh).
3. To decide or declare authoritatively or judicially; decree: The judges ruled that the answer was acceptable. The police ruled the death a homicide. The law was ruled unconstitutional. See Synonyms at decide.
4.
a. To mark with straight parallel lines.
b. To mark (a straight line), as with a ruler.
v.intr.
1. To be in total control or command; exercise supreme authority.
2. To formulate and issue a decree or decision.
3. To prevail at a particular level or rate: Prices ruled low.
4. Slang To be excellent or superior: That new video game rules!
Phrasal Verb:
rule out
1. To prevent; preclude: The snowstorm ruled out their weekly meeting.
2. To remove from consideration; exclude: The option of starting over has been ruled out.
Idiom:
as a rule
In general; for the most part: As a rule, we take the bus.

[Middle English reule, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *regula, from Latin rēgula, rod, principle; see reg- in Indo-European roots.]

rul′a·ble adj.

rule

(ruːl)
n
1. an authoritative regulation or direction concerning method or procedure, as for a court of law, legislative body, game, or other human institution or activity: judges' rules; play according to the rules.
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the exercise of governmental authority or control: the rule of Caesar.
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the period of time in which a monarch or government has power: his rule lasted 100 days.
4. a customary form or procedure; regular course of action: he made a morning swim his rule.
5. the rule the common order of things; normal condition: violence was the rule rather than the exception.
6. (Mathematics) a prescribed method or procedure for solving a mathematical problem, or one constituting part of a computer program, usually expressed in an appropriate formalism
7. (Computer Science) a prescribed method or procedure for solving a mathematical problem, or one constituting part of a computer program, usually expressed in an appropriate formalism
8. (Grammar) a formal expression of a grammatical regularity in a linguistic description of a language
9. (Tools) any of various devices with a straight edge for guiding or measuring; ruler: a carpenter's rule.
10. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding)
a. a printed or drawn character in the form of a long thin line
b. another name for dash113: en rule; em rule.
c. a strip of brass or other metal used to print such a line
11. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity a systematic body of prescriptions defining the way of life to be followed by members of a religious order
12. (Law) law an order by a court or judge
13. as a rule normally or ordinarily
vb
14. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) to exercise governing or controlling authority over (a people, political unit, individual, etc): he ruled for 20 years; his passion for her ruled his life.
15. (when tr, often takes a clause as object) to decide authoritatively; decree: the chairman ruled against the proposal.
16. (tr) to mark with straight parallel lines or make one straight line, as with a ruler: to rule a margin.
17. (tr) to restrain or control: to rule one's temper.
18. (intr) to be customary or prevalent: chaos rules in this school.
19. (intr) to be pre-eminent or superior: football rules in the field of sport.
20. (Astrology) (tr) astrology (of a planet) to have a strong affinity with certain human attributes, activities, etc, associated with (one or sometimes two signs of the zodiac): Mars rules Aries.
21. rule the roost rule the roast to be pre-eminent; be in charge
[C13: from Old French riule, from Latin rēgula a straight edge; see regulate]
ˈrulable adj

rule

(rul)

n., v. ruled, rul•ing. n.
1. a principle or regulation governing conduct, procedure, arrangement, etc.
2. the customary or normal circumstance, occurrence, practice, quality, etc.: the rule rather than the exception.
3. control, government, or dominion.
4. tenure or conduct of reign or office.
5. the code of regulations observed by a religious order or congregation.
6. a prescribed mathematical method for performing a calculation or solving a problem.
8. a solid or decorative line, as used for separating newspaper columns.
9.
a. a formal order made by a law court, esp. for governing the procedure of the court.
b. a legal principle.
c. a court order in a particular case.
10. Obs. behavior.
v.t.
11. to exercise dominating power, authority, or influence over; govern: to rule a kingdom.
12. to decide or declare judicially or authoritatively; decree.
13. to mark with lines, esp. parallel straight lines, with the aid of a ruler or the like: to rule paper.
14. to mark out or form (a line) by this method.
15. to be superior or preeminent in (a field or group); hold sway over.
v.i.
16. to exercise dominating power or influence; predominate.
17. to exercise authority, dominion, or sovereignty.
18. to make a formal decision or ruling, as on a point at law.
19. to be prevalent or current.
20. Slang. to be especially popular, preeminent, or superlative: The Yankees rule!
21. rule out, to eliminate from consideration.
Idioms:
as a rule, generally; usually.
[1175–1225; (n.) Middle English riule, reule < Old French riule < Latin rēgula straight stick, pattern, derivative of regere to fix the line of, direct (see -ule); (v.) Middle English riwlen, reulen, rewellen < Old French riuler, rieuler < Late Latin rēgulāre, derivative of Latin rēgula]

rule

- One of many words from Latin regula, "straight stick, ruler."
See also related terms for ruler.

rule


Past participle: ruled
Gerund: ruling

Imperative
rule
rule
Present
I rule
you rule
he/she/it rules
we rule
you rule
they rule
Preterite
I ruled
you ruled
he/she/it ruled
we ruled
you ruled
they ruled
Present Continuous
I am ruling
you are ruling
he/she/it is ruling
we are ruling
you are ruling
they are ruling
Present Perfect
I have ruled
you have ruled
he/she/it has ruled
we have ruled
you have ruled
they have ruled
Past Continuous
I was ruling
you were ruling
he/she/it was ruling
we were ruling
you were ruling
they were ruling
Past Perfect
I had ruled
you had ruled
he/she/it had ruled
we had ruled
you had ruled
they had ruled
Future
I will rule
you will rule
he/she/it will rule
we will rule
you will rule
they will rule
Future Perfect
I will have ruled
you will have ruled
he/she/it will have ruled
we will have ruled
you will have ruled
they will have ruled
Future Continuous
I will be ruling
you will be ruling
he/she/it will be ruling
we will be ruling
you will be ruling
they will be ruling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been ruling
you have been ruling
he/she/it has been ruling
we have been ruling
you have been ruling
they have been ruling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been ruling
you will have been ruling
he/she/it will have been ruling
we will have been ruling
you will have been ruling
they will have been ruling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been ruling
you had been ruling
he/she/it had been ruling
we had been ruling
you had been ruling
they had been ruling
Conditional
I would rule
you would rule
he/she/it would rule
we would rule
you would rule
they would rule
Past Conditional
I would have ruled
you would have ruled
he/she/it would have ruled
we would have ruled
you would have ruled
they would have ruled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rule - a principle or condition that customarily governs behaviorrule - a principle or condition that customarily governs behavior; "it was his rule to take a walk before breakfast"; "short haircuts were the regulation"
concept, conception, construct - an abstract or general idea inferred or derived from specific instances
limitation, restriction - a principle that limits the extent of something; "I am willing to accept certain restrictions on my movements"
guidepost, rule of thumb, guideline - a rule or principle that provides guidance to appropriate behavior
cy pres, cy pres doctrine, rule of cy pres - a rule that when literal compliance is impossible the intention of a donor or testator should be carried out as nearly as possible
working principle, working rule - a rule that is adequate to permit work to be done
2.rule - something regarded as a normative examplerule - something regarded as a normative example; "the convention of not naming the main character"; "violence is the rule not the exception"; "his formula for impressing visitors"
practice - knowledge of how something is usually done; "it is not the local practice to wear shorts to dinner"
mores - (sociology) the conventions that embody the fundamental values of a group
code of behavior, code of conduct - a set of conventional principles and expectations that are considered binding on any person who is a member of a particular group
universal - a behavioral convention or pattern characteristic of all members of a particular culture or of all human beings; "some form of religion seems to be a human universal"
3.rule - prescribed guide for conduct or actionrule - prescribed guide for conduct or action
bylaw - a rule adopted by an organization in order to regulate its own affairs and the behavior of its members
rubric - an authoritative rule of conduct or procedure
parliamentary law, parliamentary procedure, rules of order, order - a body of rules followed by an assembly
rule of evidence - (law) a rule of law whereby any alleged matter of fact that is submitted for investigation at a judicial trial is established or disproved
Miranda rule - the rule that police (when interrogating you after an arrest) are obliged to warn you that anything you say may be used as evidence and to read you your constitutional rights (the right to a lawyer and the right to remain silent until advised by a lawyer)
precept, principle - rule of personal conduct
golden rule - any important rule; "the golden rule of teaching is to be clear"
GIGO - (computer science) a rule stating that the quality of the output is a function of the quality of the input; put garbage in and you get garbage out
dictate - an authoritative rule
ordinance, regulation - an authoritative rule
canon - a rule or especially body of rules or principles generally established as valid and fundamental in a field or art or philosophy; "the neoclassical canon"; "canons of polite society"
etiquette - rules governing socially acceptable behavior
communications protocol, protocol - (computer science) rules determining the format and transmission of data
instruction, direction - a message describing how something is to be done; "he gave directions faster than she could follow them"
rule book, book - a collection of rules or prescribed standards on the basis of which decisions are made; "they run things by the book around here"
4.rule - (linguistics) a rule describing (or prescribing) a linguistic practice
concept, conception, construct - an abstract or general idea inferred or derived from specific instances
linguistics - the scientific study of language
linguistic universal, universal - (linguistics) a grammatical rule (or other linguistic feature) that is found in all languages
grammatical rule, rule of grammar - a linguistic rule for the syntax of grammatical utterances
morphological rule, rule of morphology - a linguistic rule for the formation of words
5.rule - a basic generalization that is accepted as true and that can be used as a basis for reasoning or conductrule - a basic generalization that is accepted as true and that can be used as a basis for reasoning or conduct; "their principles of composition characterized all their works"
generalisation, generality, generalization - an idea or conclusion having general application; "he spoke in broad generalities"
pillar - a fundamental principle or practice; "science eroded the pillars of superstition"
yang - the bright positive masculine principle in Chinese dualistic cosmology; "yin and yang together produce everything that comes into existence"
yin - the dark negative feminine principle in Chinese dualistic cosmology; "the interaction of yin and yang maintains the harmony of the universe"
feng shui - rules in Chinese philosophy that govern spatial arrangement and orientation in relation to patterns of yin and yang and the flow of energy (qi); the favorable or unfavorable effects are taken into consideration in designing and siting buildings and graves and furniture
6.rule - the duration of a monarch's or government's power; "during the rule of Elizabeth"
duration, continuance - the period of time during which something continues
regency - the period of time during which a regent governs
7.rule - dominance or power through legal authorityrule - dominance or power through legal authority; "France held undisputed dominion over vast areas of Africa"; "the rule of Caesar"
ascendance, ascendancy, ascendence, ascendency, dominance, control - the state that exists when one person or group has power over another; "her apparent dominance of her husband was really her attempt to make him pay attention to her"
paramountcy - the state of being paramount; the highest rank or authority
raj - British dominion over India (1757-1947)
sovereignty, reign - royal authority; the dominion of a monarch
suzerainty - the position or authority of a suzerain; "under the suzerainty of..."
8.rule - directions that define the way a game or sport is to be conducted; "he knew the rules of chess"
instruction, direction - a message describing how something is to be done; "he gave directions faster than she could follow them"
ground rule - (baseball) a special rule (as in baseball) dealing with situations that arise due to the nature of the playing grounds
rule book, book - a collection of rules or prescribed standards on the basis of which decisions are made; "they run things by the book around here"
9.rule - any one of a systematic body of regulations defining the way of life of members of a religious order; "the rule of St. Dominic"
instruction, direction - a message describing how something is to be done; "he gave directions faster than she could follow them"
10.rule - a rule or law concerning a natural phenomenon or the function of a complex system; "the principle of the conservation of mass"; "the principle of jet propulsion"; "the right-hand rule for inductive fields"
law of nature, law - a generalization that describes recurring facts or events in nature; "the laws of thermodynamics"
Gestalt law of organization, Gestalt principle of organization - a principle of Gestalt psychology that identifies factors leading to particular forms of perceptual organization
Le Chatelier principle, Le Chatelier-Braun principle, Le Chatelier's law, Le Chatelier's principle - the principle that if any change is imposed on a system that is in equilibrium then the system tends to adjust to a new equilibrium counteracting the change
Gresham's Law - (economics) the principle that when two kinds of money having the same denominational value are in circulation the intrinsically more valuable money will be hoarded and the money of lower intrinsic value will circulate more freely until the intrinsically more valuable money is driven out of circulation; bad money drives out good; credited to Sir Thomas Gresham
mass-energy equivalence - (physics) the principle that a measured quantity of mass is equivalent (according to relativity theory) to a measured quantity of energy
Naegele's rule - rule for calculating an expected delivery date; subtract three months from the first day of the last menstrual period and add seven days to that date
law of parsimony, Occam's Razor, Ockham's Razor, principle of parsimony - the principle that entities should not be multiplied needlessly; the simplest of two competing theories is to be preferred
principle of equivalence - (physics) the principle that an observer has no way of distinguishing whether his laboratory is in a uniform gravitational field or is in an accelerated frame of reference
principle of liquid displacement - (hydrostatics) the volume of a body immersed in a fluid is equal to the volume of the displaced fluid
Huygens' principle of superposition, principle of superposition - the displacement of any point due to the superposition of wave systems is equal to the sum of the displacements of the individual waves at that point; "the principle of superposition is the basis of the wave theory of light"
principle of superposition, superposition principle, superposition - (geology) the principle that in a series of stratified sedimentary rocks the lowest stratum is the oldest
mass action, mass-action principle - (neurology) the principle that the cortex of the brain operates as a coordinated system with large masses of neural tissue involved in all complex functioning
localisation, localisation of function, localisation principle, localization of function, localization principle, localization - (physiology) the principle that specific functions have relatively circumscribed locations in some particular part or organ of the body
11.rule - (mathematics) a standard procedure for solving a class of mathematical problems; "he determined the upper bound with Descartes' rule of signs"; "he gave us a general formula for attacking polynomials"
procedure, process - a particular course of action intended to achieve a result; "the procedure of obtaining a driver's license"; "it was a process of trial and error"
metarule - a rule that describes how other rules should be used (as in AI)
algorithm, algorithmic program, algorithmic rule - a precise rule (or set of rules) specifying how to solve some problem
heuristic, heuristic program, heuristic rule - a commonsense rule (or set of rules) intended to increase the probability of solving some problem
recursion - (mathematics) an expression such that each term is generated by repeating a particular mathematical operation
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
12.rule - measuring stick consisting of a strip of wood or metal or plastic with a straight edge that is used for drawing straight lines and measuring lengthsrule - measuring stick consisting of a strip of wood or metal or plastic with a straight edge that is used for drawing straight lines and measuring lengths
carpenter's rule - a rule used by a carpenter
foot rule - a ruler one foot long
measuring rod, measuring stick, measure - measuring instrument having a sequence of marks at regular intervals; used as a reference in making measurements
meterstick, metrestick - a rule one meter long (usually marked off in centimeters and millimeters)
yard measure, yardstick - a ruler or tape that is three feet long
Verb1.rule - exercise authority over; as of nations; "Who is governing the country now?"
control, command - exercise authoritative control or power over; "control the budget"; "Command the military forces"
throne - sit on the throne as a ruler
misgovern - govern badly
dictate - rule as a dictator
reign - have sovereign power; "Henry VIII reigned for a long time"
2.rule - decide with authority; "The King decreed that all firstborn males should be killed"
decide, make up one's mind, determine - reach, make, or come to a decision about something; "We finally decided after lengthy deliberations"
override, overrule, overthrow, overturn, reverse - rule against; "The Republicans were overruled when the House voted on the bill"
rule in, rule out - include or exclude by determining judicially or in agreement with rules
close out, rule out, preclude - make impossible, especially beforehand
3.rule - be larger in number, quantity, power, status or importance; "Money reigns supreme here"; "Hispanics predominate in this neighborhood"
override - prevail over; "health considerations override financial concerns"
overarch - be central or dominant; "This scene overarches the entire first act"
outbalance, overbalance, preponderate, outweigh - weigh more heavily; "these considerations outweigh our wishes"
4.rule - decide on and make a declaration about; "find someone guilty"
feel, find - come to believe on the basis of emotion, intuitions, or indefinite grounds; "I feel that he doesn't like me"; "I find him to be obnoxious"; "I found the movie rather entertaining"
pronounce, label, judge - pronounce judgment on; "They labeled him unfit to work here"
5.rule - have an affinity with; of signs of the zodiac
accompany, attach to, come with, go with - be present or associated with an event or entity; "French fries come with the hamburger"; "heart attacks are accompanied by distruction of heart tissue"; "fish usually goes with white wine"; "this kind of vein accompanies certain arteries"
6.rule - mark or draw with a ruler; "rule the margins"
draw - represent by making a drawing of, as with a pencil, chalk, etc. on a surface; "She drew an elephant"; "Draw me a horse"
7.rule - keep in check; "rule one's temper"
confine, limit, throttle, trammel, restrain, restrict, bound - place limits on (extent or access); "restrict the use of this parking lot"; "limit the time you can spend with your friends"

rule

noun
1. regulation, order, law, ruling, guide, direction, guideline, decree, ordinance, dictum the rule against retrospective prosecution
2. precept, principle, criterion, canon, maxim, tenet, axiom An important rule is to drink plenty of water.
3. procedure, policy, standard, method, way, course, formula according to the rules of quantum theory
4. custom, procedure, practice, routine, form, condition, tradition, habit, convention, wont, order or way of things The usual rule is to start as one group.
verb
1. govern, lead, control, manage, direct, guide, regulate, administer, oversee, preside over, have power over, reign over, command over, have charge of the feudal lord who ruled this land
2. reign, govern, be in power, hold sway, wear the crown, be in authority, be number one (informal) He ruled for eight years.
3. control, dominate, monopolize, tyrannize, be pre-eminent, have the upper hand over Fear can rule our lives.
4. decree, find, decide, judge, establish, determine, settle, resolve, pronounce, lay down, adjudge The court ruled that laws passed by the assembly remained valid.
5. be prevalent, prevail, predominate, hold sway, be customary, preponderate, obtain A ferocious form of anarchy ruled here.
as a rule usually, generally, mainly, normally, on the whole, for the most part, ordinarily, customarily As a rule, these tourists take far too many souvenirs with them.
rule someone out exclude, eliminate, disqualify, ban, prevent, reject, dismiss, forbid, prohibit, leave out, preclude, proscribe, obviate, debar a suspension which ruled him out of the grand final
rule something out reject, dismiss, exclude, eliminate, disregard, preclude, obviate Local detectives have ruled out foul play.
Quotations
"He shall rule them with a rod of iron" Bible: Revelation
"My people and I have come to an agreement which satisfies us both. They are to say what they please, and I am to do what I please" [Frederick the Great]
"The hand that rocks the cradle"
"Is the hand that rules the world" [William Ross Wallace John O'London's Treasure Trove]
"Rules and models destroy genius and art" [William Hazlitt Sketches and Essays]

rule

noun
1. The act of exercising controlling power or the condition of being so controlled:
2. The continuous exercise of authority over a political unit:
3. A system by which a political unit is controlled:
4. A principle governing affairs within or among political units:
5. A code or set of codes governing action or procedure, for example:
6. A regular or customary matter, condition, or course of events:
verb
1. To exercise authority or influence over:
Idioms: be at the helm, be in the driver's seat, hold sway over, hold the reins.
2. To exercise the authority of a sovereign:
Archaic: sway.
Idiom: wear the crown.
3. To command or issue commands in an arrogant manner:
4. To occupy the preeminent position in:
Idioms: have the ascendancy, reign supreme.
5. To make a decision about (a controversy or dispute, for example) after deliberation, as in a court of law:
phrasal verb
rule out
1. To prohibit from occurring by advance planning or action:
2. To keep from being admitted, included, or considered:
Translations
حُكْمقاعِدَهقانونقانون، نِظاممِسْطَرَه
pravidlovládnoutpravítkopředpisřád
styreregelregereerklærelineal
regi
joonlaudjuhis
hallitasääntövallitaviivainviivoitin
pravilovladati
szabályszabályozuraluralkodikvonalaz
reglaregla, lögmálregla, venjareglustika, tommustokkurstjórn
支配する規則
규칙통치하다
imperare
atskirti linijaliniuotasliniuotėmetrasvaldantysis
izlemtlikumi, noteikumilikumslineālsmetramērs
narysovaťpravidloskladací meter
dosoditipraviloupravavladanjevladati
styraregelregeralinjal
ปกครองหลักเกณฑ์
lãnh đạoquy tắc

rule

[ruːl]
A. N
1. (= regulation) → regla f, norma f rules [of competition] → bases fpl
it's the rulesson las reglas, ésa es la norma
the rules of the gamelas reglas del juego
the rules of chesslas reglas del ajedrez
school rulesreglamento msing escolar
it's a rule that all guests must vacate their rooms by 10a.mpor norma los clientes tienen que dejar la habitación antes de las 10 de la mañana
running is against the rules, it's against the rules to runestá prohibido correr
to break the rulesinfringir las reglas or las normas or el reglamento
to make the rulesdictar las normas
in my job I'm allowed to make my own rulesen mi trabajo se me permite decidir cómo se hacen las cosas
to play by the rules (fig) → obedecer las reglas or las normas
I couldn't stand a life governed by rules and regulationsno soportaría una vida llena de reglas y normas
rules of the roadnormas fpl or reglamento msing de tráfico
see also bend B1
see also golden, ground, work B1
2. (= guiding principle) → regla f
rule of three (Math) → regla f de tres
rule of thumbregla f general
as a rule of thumb, a bottle of wine holds six glassespor regla general, una botella de vino da para seis vasos
I just do it by rule of thumblo hago simplemente siguiendo mi criterio
3. (= habit, custom) → norma f
short haircuts became the ruleel pelo corto se convirtió en la norma
as a (general) rulepor regla general, en general, normalmente
he makes it a rule to get up earlytiene por norma or por sistema levantarse temprano
see also exception
4. (= government) → gobierno m; (= reign) → reinado m
military/one-party rulegobierno m militar/unipartidista
the rule of lawel imperio de la ley
under British rulebajo el dominio británico
under the rule of Louis XVbajo el reinado de Luis XV
5. (for measuring) → regla f
B. VT
1. (= govern) → gobernar
to rule the roostllevar la batuta
2. (= dominate, control) → controlar, dominar
you shouldn't let work rule your lifeno deberías permitir que el trabajo controlara or dominara tu vida
Mars rules AriesAries está bajo la influencia de Marte
see also heart A2
3. (esp Jur) (= declare) → dictaminar
the court has ruled the strike to be illegalel tribunal ha dictaminado que la huelga es ilegal
the motion was ruled out of orderse decidió que la moción no procedía
4. (= draw) [+ line] → trazar; (= draw lines on) [+ paper] → reglar
see also ruled
C. VI
1. (= govern) → gobernar; [monarch] → reinar
to rule over sth/sbgobernar algo/a algn
the king ruled over his subjects wiselyel rey gobernaba a sus súbditos con sabiduría
the British ruled over a vast empirelos británicos poseyeron un vasto imperio
the ancient dynasties that ruled over Chinalas viejas dinastías que reinaban en China
one god who rules over all mankindun dios que tiene poder sobre toda la humanidad
see also rod
2. (= prevail) → reinar
United rules OK (in graffiti) → ¡aúpa United!, ¡arriba United!
3. (= decide) [chairman, president] → decidir, resolver; [judge, jury] → fallar
to rule against sth/sbfallar or resolver en contra de algo/algn
to rule in favour of sth/sbfallar en or a favor de algo/algn, resolver en or a favor de algo/algn
to rule on sthfallar or resolver or decidir en algo
D. CPD rule book Nreglamento m
we'll do it by or go by the rule booklo haremos de acuerdo con las normas
rule off VT + ADV
1. (with ruler) → separar con una línea
2. (Comm) [+ account] → cerrar
rule out VT + ADV
1. (= exclude) [+ action, possibility] → descartar, excluir; [+ candidate] → excluir
military intervention has not been ruled outno se ha descartado una intervención militar
a back injury has ruled him out of the matchuna lesión en la espalda lo ha excluido del partido
the age limit rules him outel límite de edad lo excluye, queda excluido por el límite de edad
2. (= make impossible) → hacer imposible, imposibilitar
the TV was on, effectively ruling out conversationla televisión estaba puesta, lo que de hecho hacía imposible or imposibilitaba toda conversación
RULE BRITANNIA
Rule Britannia es una canción patriótica que data de 1740. La letra, escrita por el poeta escocés James Thomson, celebra el control marítimo del que Gran Bretaña disfrutaba en aquella época. Aunque algunos critican el tono excesivamente chovinista de la canción, Rule Britannia aún se canta en algunas celebraciones de carácter patriótico, como la Last Night of the Proms. El estribillo reza así: Rule Britannia, Britannia rule the waves, Britons never never never shall be slaves.

rule

[ˈruːl]
n
[game, sport, competition, religion] → règle f; [school, union, club, company] → règle f
Courtesy to others is a very important school rule → La politesse envers les autres est une règle très importante de l'école.
the rules of basketball → les règles du basket-ball
safety rules → les règles de sécurité
rules and regulations → règles et réglementation
to be against the rules → être contraire au règlement
It's against the rules → C'est contraire au règlement.
to break a rule → enfreindre une règle
to break the rules → enfreindre les règles
to bend the rules, to stretch the rules → faire une entorse au règlement
to work to rule (British) [employees] → faire la grève du zèle
[language, grammar, theory] → règle f
the rules of grammar → les règles de la grammaire
(= guideline) → règle f
The first rule of finance is don't borrow to invest → La première règle de la finance c'est de ne pas emprunter pour investir.
as a rule of thumb → en règle générale
by rule of thumb → à vue de nez
(= normal state of affairs) → règle f
to be the rule → être la règle
as a rule → normalement, en règle générale
(= system) → système m
(= dominion) under British rule → sous mandat britannique
vt
[+ country] → gouverner
[+ household, institution] → dominer
(= decide) → ordonner
to rule that [umpire, judge] → statuer que
vi
(= govern) → régner
to rule over [+ place, people] → régner sur
(LAW) (= decide) [umpire, judge, court] → statuer
to rule against sth → statuer contre qch
to rule in favour of sth → statuer en faveur de qch
to rule on sth → statuer sur qch
rule in
vt sepconfirmer
I cannot rule anything out and I cannot rule anything in → Je ne peux ni infirmer ni confirmer quoi que ce soit.
rule out
vt sepexclure
Murder cannot be ruled out → L'hypothèse d'un meurtre ne peut être exclue.
I'm not ruling anything out → Je n'exclus aucune possibilité.
to rule sb out of sth [+ game, competition, match] → tenir qn écarté(e) de qchrule book rulebook [ˈruːlbʊk] nrèglement m
to play by the rule book → s'en tenir au règlement

rule

n
(= regulation)Regel f; (Sport, Cards) → (Spiel)regel f; (Admin) → Vorschrift f, → Bestimmung f; the rules of the game (lit, fig)die Spielregeln; to play by the rules (lit, fig)die Spielregeln einhalten; to bend or stretch the ruleses mit den Regeln/Vorschriften nicht so genau nehmen; running is against the rules, it’s against the rules to runRennen ist nicht erlaubt; rules and regulationsRegeln und Bestimmungen; it’s a rule that …es ist Vorschrift, dass …; that’s the rule of the road (Mot) → das ist im Straßenverkehr üblich; the Franciscan ruledie Regeln des Franziskanerordens; to work to ruleDienst nach Vorschrift machen; to do something by ruleetw vorschriftsmäßig tun; the rule of three (Math) → der Dreisatz; as a rule of thumbals Faustregel; rule bookRegelheft nt, → Vorschriftenbuch nt; to throw the rule book at somebody (fig)jdn wegen jeder Kleinigkeit drankriegen (inf)
(= custom)Regel f; I make it a rule to get up earlyich habe es mir zur Regel gemacht, früh aufzustehen; as a (general) rulein der Regel; ties are the rule at the officeKrawatten sind im Büro die Regel; violence is the rule rather than the exceptionGewalt ist eher (die) Regel als (die) Ausnahme
(= authority, reign)Herrschaft f; (= period)Regierungszeit f; the rule of lawdie Rechtsstaatlichkeit
(for measuring) → Metermaß nt, → Maßstab m; a foot rule (1 foot long) → ein (30 cm langes) Lineal; (showing feet) → ein Maßstab mmit Fußeinteilung; folding ruleZollstock m ? slide rule
vt
(= govern)beherrschen, regieren; (individual) → beherrschen, herrschen über (+acc); (fig) passions, emotionbeherrschen, zügeln; personbeherrschen; to rule the roost (fig)Herr im Haus sein (inf); to be ruled by emotionssich von Gefühlen beherrschen lassen; if you would only be ruled by what I saywenn du nur auf mich hören würdest; I won’t be ruled by what he wantsich richte mich nicht nach seinen Wünschen; he let his heart rule his header ließ sich von seinem Herzen und nicht von seinem Verstand leiten
(Jur, Sport, Admin: = give decision) → entscheiden; his question was ruled out of orderseine Frage wurde als unzulässig abgewiesen; the judge ruled the defence out of order (Jur) → der Richter rügte die Verteidigung
(= draw lines on) paperlinieren; (= draw) line, marginziehen; ruled paperliniertes Papier
vi
(lit, fig: = reign) → herrschen (→ over über +acc), → regieren (→ over +acc)
(Fin: = prices) → notieren; the prices ruling in Londondie in London notierten Preise
(Jur) → entscheiden (→ against gegen, in favour of für, on in +dat)

rule

[ruːl]
1. n
a. (gen) → regola; (regulation) → regola, regolamento
the rules of the road → le norme della circolazione stradale
rules and regulations → norme e regolamenti
it's against the rules → è contro le regole or il regolamento
as a rule → normalmente, di regola
to make it a rule to do sth → essersi imposto/a la regola di fare qc
by rule of thumb → a lume di naso
b. (dominion) under British rulesotto il dominio britannico
majority rule (Pol) → governo di maggioranza
c. (for measuring) → riga
slide rule → regolo (calcolatore)
2. vt
a. (govern, YYY) (also rule over) (country) → governare
he's ruled by his wife → è sua moglie che comanda
b. (subj, umpire, judge) to rule (that)decretare (che), decidere (che)
c. (paper, page) → rigare
3. vi
a. (monarch) → regnare
b. (Law) to rule against/in favour of/onpronunciarsi a sfavore di/in favore di/su
rule out vt + advescludere
murder cannot be ruled out → non si esclude che si tratti di omicidio

rule

(ruːl) noun
1. government. under foreign rule.
2. a regulation or order. school rules.
3. what usually happens or is done; a general principle. He is an exception to the rule that fat people are usually happy.
4. a general standard that guides one's actions. I make it a rule never to be late for appointments.
5. a marked strip of wood, metal etc for measuring. He measured the windows with a rule.
verb
1. to govern. The king ruled (the people) wisely.
2. to decide officially. The judge ruled that the witness should be heard.
3. to draw (a straight line). He ruled a line across the page.
ruled adjective
having straight lines drawn across. ruled paper.
ˈruler noun
1. a person who governs. the ruler of the state.
2. a long narrow piece of wood, plastic etc for drawing straight lines. I can't draw straight lines without a ruler.
ˈruling adjective
governing. the ruling party.
noun
an official decision. The judge gave his ruling.
as a rule
usually. I don't go out in the evening as a rule.
rule off
to draw a line in order to separate. He ruled off the rest of the page.
rule out
to leave out; not to consider. We mustn't rule out the possibility of bad weather.

rule

حُكْم, يَتَحَكَّمُ pravidlo, vládnout regel, styre Regel, regieren κανόνας, κυβερνώ gobernar, regla hallita, sääntö gouverner, règle pravilo, vladati governare, regole 支配する, 規則 규칙, 통치하다 heersen, regel regel, regjere reguła, rządzić governar, regra правило, управлять regel, styra ปกครอง, หลักเกณฑ์ kural, yönetmek lãnh đạo, quy tắc 统治, 规则

rule

n. régimen, regla, precepto;
___ s and regulationssegún el reglamento;
as a ___por lo general;
v. gobernar, administrar;
to ___ outprohibir, desechar;
to be ruled by one's emotionsdejarse llevar por las emociones.

rule

n regla; vt to — out descartar; Cancer was ruled out..Se descartó el cáncer.
References in classic literature ?
She missed her mother's help to understand and rule herself, but having been taught where to look, she did her best to find the way and walk in it confidingly.
He was one of those rare, little- understood men who rule by a power so gentle that it passes as a lovable weakness.
Young Aubigny's rule was a strict one, too, and under it his negroes had forgotten how to be gay, as they had been during the old master's easy-going and indulgent lifetime.
In this manner does the mother country absorb even the fame, under that system of rule.
They knew, these excellent old persons, that, by all established rule -- and, as regarded some of them, weighed by their own lack of efficiency for business -- they ought to have given place to younger men, more orthodox in politics, and altogether fitter than themselves to serve our common Uncle.
Another convulsive kick in the ribs, and old Gunpowder sprang upon the bridge; he thundered over the resounding planks; he gained the opposite side; and now Ichabod cast a look behind to see if his pursuer should vanish, according to rule, in a flash of fire and brimstone.
This was a rule indeed which only added to the satiric effect of my being plied with the supposition that he might at any moment be among us.
As a general rule, he can't amount to much in his totality.
But I had no hand in shipping that ivory arm there; that thing is against all rule --pointing at it with the marlingspike -- that is the captain's work, not mine; he ordered the carpenter to make it; he had that club-hammer there put to the end, to knock some one's brains out with, I suppose, as he tried mine once.
I remember our John Manly's rule, never to allow a pipe in the stable, and thought it ought to be the rule everywhere.
It was one of the laws of the veselija that no one goes hungry; and, while a rule made in the forests of Lithuania is hard to apply in the stockyards district of Chicago, with its quarter of a million inhabitants, still they did their best, and the children who ran in from the street, and even the dogs, went out again happier.
The text was, `He hath made everything beautiful in its season;' and he showed how all the orders and distinctions in society came from God; and that it was so appropriate, you know, and beautiful, that some should be high and some low, and that some were born to rule and some to serve, and all that, you know; and he applied it so well to all this ridiculous fuss that is made about slavery, and he proved distinctly that the Bible was on our side, and supported all our institutions so convincingly.