rumbly


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rum·ble

 (rŭm′bəl)
v. rum·bled, rum·bling, rum·bles
v.intr.
1. To make a deep, long, rolling sound.
2. To move or proceed with a deep, long, rolling sound.
3. Slang To engage in a gang fight.
v.tr.
1. To utter with a deep, long, rolling sound.
2. To polish or mix (metal parts) in a tumbling box.
n.
1. A deep, long, rolling sound.
2. A tumbling box.
3. A luggage compartment or servant's seat in the rear of a carriage.
4. Slang
a. Pervasive, widespread expression of unrest or dissatisfaction.
b. A gang fight.

[Middle English romblen, perhaps from Middle Dutch rommelen or from Middle Low German rummeln.]

rum′bler n.
rum′bling·ly adv.
rum′bly adj.

rumbly

(ˈrʌmblɪ)
adj, -lier or -liest
rumbling or liable to rumble
References in classic literature ?
They both reared up facing each other, and I was expecting a furious fight, when a gurgly, rumbly voice, called out of the darkness to the right-- "Children, what are you fighting about there?
Unfortunately, pre-marital sex didn't happen in those days," he goes on in his rumbly American drawl, "so horny old man marries a walking refrigerator".
But Walrus is hungry, with a rumbly tummy--so Flynn makes a large snack; Walrus is cold--so Flynn fetches blankets; Walrus is too hot and needs a glass of milk, and then has to use the bathroom--unseen by Mum and Dad, as Walrus is behind the door; Flynn sings Walrus to sleep, who isn't impressed--neither are Mum and Dad; Walrus needs a nice, big cuddle and falls asleep--but there's no room for Flynn in the bed.
They pick up rumbly tones pitched around 70 to 200 hertz, Hoy says; people hear best between 500 and 1,000 hertz.
And thirdly, pull-along suitcases make that noise, a sort of rumbly, rattly, scrapey noise, an empty thud-thud-thud-thud-thud as the wheels hit every flipping paving stone, because the designers of pull-along suitcases did not anticipate that anybody would ever take them out of the house.
And thirdly, pull-along suitcases make that noise, a sort of rumbly, rattly, scrapey noise, an empty thud-thudthud as the wheels hit every flipping paving stone, because the designers of pull-along suitcases did not anticipate that anybody would ever take them out of the house.
In the performance notes, Hatfield directs singers to use "an airy, throaty, rumbly tone, deep in the throat" (1993, p.
It's been a little rumbly,'' understated Bob Colli, a retired corrections officer on All Hallows Road in Plainfield.
The bass was loose and rumbly, the mids were very muted and the treble swayed between being overly sharp to flat.
Sounds and toys were pretty easy to pair: a "Tickle me" audio clip for Elmo; "I love cookies" for Cookie Monster; and "There is a rumbly in my tummy" for Winnie the Pooh.
We get a lot around here but this one sounded different – it was more rumbly.