run around


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run around

vb (intr, adverb)
1. (often foll by with) to associate habitually (with)
2. to behave in a fickle or promiscuous manner
n
3. informal deceitful or evasive treatment of a person (esp in the phrase give or get the run-around)
4. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing an arrangement of printed matter in which the column width is narrowed to accommodate an illustration
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.run around - play boisterously; "The children frolicked in the garden"; "the gamboling lambs in the meadows"; "The toddlers romped in the playroom"
play - be at play; be engaged in playful activity; amuse oneself in a way characteristic of children; "The kids were playing outside all day"; "I used to play with trucks as a little girl"

run

verb
1. To move swiftly on foot so that both feet leave the ground during each stride:
3. To leave hastily:
Idioms: beat it, hightail it, hotfoot it , make tracks.
4. To move or proceed away from a place.Also used with along:
Slang: blow, split, take off.
5. To be with as a companion.Also used with around:
Slang: hang out.
Idiom: rub elbows.
6. To look to when in need:
7. To complete a race or competition in a specified position:
8. To move freely as a liquid:
9. To come forth or emit in abundance:
10. To change from a solid to a liquid:
11. To proceed on a certain course or for a certain distance:
12. To change or fluctuate within limits:
13. To be performed:
14. To urge to move along:
15. To look for and pursue (game) in order to capture or kill it:
16. To perform a function effectively:
17. To set or keep going:
18. To control or direct the functioning of:
19. To import or export secretly and illegally:
Idiom: run contraband.
20. To separate or pull apart by force:
21. To cause to penetrate with force:
22. To control the course of (an activity):
23. To have charge of (the affairs of others):
phrasal verb
run across
To find or meet by chance:
bump into, chance on (or upon), come across, come on (or upon), find, happen on (or upon), light on (or upon), run into, stumble on (or upon), tumble on.
Archaic: alight on (or upon).
Idiom: meet up with.
phrasal verb
run after
To follow (another) with the intent of overtaking and capturing:
Idioms: be in pursuit, give chase.
phrasal verb
run away
To break loose and leave suddenly, as from confinement or from a difficult or threatening situation:
Informal: skip (out).
Slang: lam.
Regional: absquatulate.
Idioms: blow the coop, cut and run, give someone the slip, make a getaway, take flight, take it on the lam.
phrasal verb
run down
1. To lose so much strength and power as to become ineffective or motionless:
Slang: poop out.
2. To pursue and locate:
Idiom: run to earth.
3. To think, represent, or speak of as small or unimportant:
4. To give a recapitulation of the salient facts of:
Informal: recap.
phrasal verb
run in
1. Slang. To take into custody as a prisoner:
Informal: nab, pick up.
Slang: bust, collar, pinch.
2. To go to or seek out the company of in order to socialize:
Idiom: pay a visit.
phrasal verb
run into
1. To find or meet by chance:
bump into, chance on (or upon), come across, come on (or upon), find, happen on (or upon), light on (or upon), run across, stumble on (or upon), tumble on.
Archaic: alight on (or upon).
Idiom: meet up with.
2. To come up against:
3. To come to in number or quantity:
Idiom: add up to.
phrasal verb
run on
To talk volubly, persistently, and usually inconsequentially:
Informal: go on, spiel.
Slang: gab, gas, jaw, yak.
phrasal verb
run out
1. To make or become no longer active or productive:
2. To prove deficient or insufficient:
3. To become void, especially through passage of time or an omission:
phrasal verb
run through
2. To give a recapitulation of the salient facts of:
Informal: recap.
3. To look through reading matter casually:
browse, dip into, flip through, glance at (or over) (or through), leaf (through), riffle (through), scan, skim, thumb (through).
phrasal verb
run upnoun
1. A trip in a motor vehicle:
Informal: spin, whirl.
2. Chiefly Regional. A small stream:
Chiefly Regional: branch, kill.
3. A hole made by tearing:
4. A number of things placed or occurring one after the other:
Informal: streak.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
He placed the hat upon the glass floor, made a pass with his hand, and then removed the hat, displaying a little white piglet no bigger than a mouse, which began to run around here and there and to grunt and squeal in a tiny, shrill voice.
He placed one upon the floor, so that it could run around, and pulled apart the other, making three piglets in all; and then one of these was pulled apart, making four piglets.
But I've dressed up so long that I'm used to it, and I don't imagine I'd care to run around naked again.
After a good run around he will crash out on the sofa and snuggle right in.
Mari added: "We got an hour to run around, and my husband, Tim, reckons it was a better workout than any gym.
I think players should be fit and should run around a bit - that's the least you should expect from them.
One reader of the guide wrote: "Why are there undisciplined children who are allowed to run around unchecked, or screaming babies who aren't taken outside to calm down?
Summary: Australian police are given the run around by a kangaroo in Melbourne.
A few months ago the radio presenter said he would run around Molineux ground naked if Stale Solbakken became manager of Wolverhampton Wanderers.
You get to hit a ball, throw a ball and run around.
Fresh from his success at the Toronto Marathon, the oldest marathon runner was in Dubai for a run around the city's landmarks.