run around


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run around

vb (intr, adverb)
1. (often foll by with) to associate habitually (with)
2. to behave in a fickle or promiscuous manner
n
3. informal deceitful or evasive treatment of a person (esp in the phrase give or get the run-around)
4. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing an arrangement of printed matter in which the column width is narrowed to accommodate an illustration
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.run around - play boisterously; "The children frolicked in the garden"; "the gamboling lambs in the meadows"; "The toddlers romped in the playroom"
play - be at play; be engaged in playful activity; amuse oneself in a way characteristic of children; "The kids were playing outside all day"; "I used to play with trucks as a little girl"

run

verb
1. To move swiftly on foot so that both feet leave the ground during each stride:
3. To leave hastily:
Idioms: beat it, hightail it, hotfoot it , make tracks.
4. To move or proceed away from a place.Also used with along:
Slang: blow, split, take off.
5. To be with as a companion.Also used with around:
Slang: hang out.
Idiom: rub elbows.
6. To look to when in need:
7. To complete a race or competition in a specified position:
8. To move freely as a liquid:
9. To come forth or emit in abundance:
10. To change from a solid to a liquid:
11. To proceed on a certain course or for a certain distance:
12. To change or fluctuate within limits:
13. To be performed:
14. To urge to move along:
15. To look for and pursue (game) in order to capture or kill it:
16. To perform a function effectively:
17. To set or keep going:
18. To control or direct the functioning of:
19. To import or export secretly and illegally:
Idiom: run contraband.
20. To separate or pull apart by force:
21. To cause to penetrate with force:
22. To control the course of (an activity):
23. To have charge of (the affairs of others):
phrasal verb
run across
To find or meet by chance:
bump into, chance on (or upon), come across, come on (or upon), find, happen on (or upon), light on (or upon), run into, stumble on (or upon), tumble on.
Archaic: alight on (or upon).
Idiom: meet up with.
phrasal verb
run after
To follow (another) with the intent of overtaking and capturing:
Idioms: be in pursuit, give chase.
phrasal verb
run away
To break loose and leave suddenly, as from confinement or from a difficult or threatening situation:
Informal: skip (out).
Slang: lam.
Regional: absquatulate.
Idioms: blow the coop, cut and run, give someone the slip, make a getaway, take flight, take it on the lam.
phrasal verb
run down
1. To lose so much strength and power as to become ineffective or motionless:
Slang: poop out.
2. To pursue and locate:
Idiom: run to earth.
3. To think, represent, or speak of as small or unimportant:
4. To give a recapitulation of the salient facts of:
Informal: recap.
phrasal verb
run in
1. Slang. To take into custody as a prisoner:
Informal: nab, pick up.
Slang: bust, collar, pinch.
2. To go to or seek out the company of in order to socialize:
Idiom: pay a visit.
phrasal verb
run into
1. To find or meet by chance:
bump into, chance on (or upon), come across, come on (or upon), find, happen on (or upon), light on (or upon), run across, stumble on (or upon), tumble on.
Archaic: alight on (or upon).
Idiom: meet up with.
2. To come up against:
3. To come to in number or quantity:
Idiom: add up to.
phrasal verb
run on
To talk volubly, persistently, and usually inconsequentially:
Informal: go on, spiel.
Slang: gab, gas, jaw, yak.
phrasal verb
run out
1. To make or become no longer active or productive:
2. To prove deficient or insufficient:
3. To become void, especially through passage of time or an omission:
phrasal verb
run through
2. To give a recapitulation of the salient facts of:
Informal: recap.
3. To look through reading matter casually:
browse, dip into, flip through, glance at (or over) (or through), leaf (through), riffle (through), scan, skim, thumb (through).
phrasal verb
run upnoun
1. A trip in a motor vehicle:
Informal: spin, whirl.
2. Chiefly Regional. A small stream:
Chiefly Regional: branch, kill.
3. A hole made by tearing:
4. A number of things placed or occurring one after the other:
Informal: streak.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
He placed the hat upon the glass floor, made a pass with his hand, and then removed the hat, displaying a little white piglet no bigger than a mouse, which began to run around here and there and to grunt and squeal in a tiny, shrill voice.
He placed one upon the floor, so that it could run around, and pulled apart the other, making three piglets in all; and then one of these was pulled apart, making four piglets.
But I've dressed up so long that I'm used to it, and I don't imagine I'd care to run around naked again.
The thoughts, too, that run around the ring of familiar guests have a piquancy and mirthfulness, and oftentimes a vivid truth, which more rarely find their way into the elaborate intercourse of dinner.
Phony, and scatter your pieces far and wide over the country, as a matter of kindness to the people you might meet if allowed to run around loose.
He checked it and attempted to haul in, but found that the fish had run around a coral branch.
Williamson said: "I wasn't surprised to read Kevin's comments because he did used to run around like a headless chicken.
They say walking on a treadmill while checking email and discussing business during a run around the track could help an average person, say a male weighing 160 pounds, lose a tremendous amount of weight with a consistent diet.
A secondary steel structure supports the bamboo facade and narrow timber pedestrian walkways that run around the perimeter of each floor.
It will run around on its two feet, flap its wings, bang this way and that .
Any farmer will tell you that certain animals run around and are unpleasant, but when they're fixed then they are happy and sedate.