run off


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run

 (rŭn)
v. ran (răn), run, run·ning, runs
v.intr.
1.
a. To move swiftly on foot so that both or all feet are not on the ground during each stride.
b. To retreat rapidly; flee: When they heard the police siren, they ran.
c. Informal To depart; leave: Sorry, I have to run.
2. To migrate, especially to move in a shoal in order to spawn. Used of fish.
3.
a. To move without hindrance or restraint: We let the dog run in the field.
b. To move or go quickly or hurriedly: run around doing errands.
c. To go when in trouble or distress: He is always running to his lawyer.
d. To make a short, quick trip or visit: ran next door to borrow a cup of sugar; ran down to the store.
4.
a. To take part in a race or contest by running: ran in the marathon; athletes who run for the gold medal.
b. To compete in a race for elected office: ran for mayor.
c. To finish a race or contest in a specified position: ran second.
5. To move freely, as on wheels: The car ran downhill. The drawer runs on small bearings.
6. To travel over a regular route: The ferry runs every hour.
7. Nautical To sail or steer before the wind or on an indicated course: run before a storm.
8.
a. To flow, especially in a steady stream: Fresh water runs from the spring. Turn on the faucet and let the water run.
b. To melt and flow: The flame made the solder run.
c. To emit pus, mucus, or serous fluid: Pollen makes my nose run.
d. To be wet or covered with a liquid: The street ran with blood. The mourners' eyes ran with tears.
e. To spread or dissolve, as dyes in fabric.
f. To have dye spread or dissolve: Colorfast garments are not supposed to run.
9.
a. To extend, stretch, or reach in a certain direction or to a particular point: This road runs to the next town.
b. To extend, spread, or climb as a result of growing: Ivy ran up the wall.
c. To become known or prevalent rapidly in or over an area: disease that ran rampant.
d. To unravel along a line: Her stocking ran.
10.
a. To be valid or in effect, as in a given area: The speed limit runs only to the town line.
b. To be present as a valid accompaniment: Fishing rights run with ownership of the land.
c. To accumulate or accrue: The interest runs from the first of the month.
11. To be in operation; function or work: The engine is running.
12.
a. To pass; elapse: Days ran into weeks.
b. To tend to persist or recur: Stinginess seems to run in that family.
13.
a. To pass into or become subject to a specified condition: We ran into debt.
b. To take a particular form, order, or expression: My reasoning runs thus. The report runs as follows.
c. To tend or incline: Their taste in art runs to the bizarre.
d. To occupy or exist in a certain range: The sizes run from small to large.
14.
a. To be presented or performed: The lecture is running late. The play ran for six months.
b. To be published or broadcast, especially as news: The story ran in the sports section on Sunday.
v.tr.
1.
a. To travel over on foot at a pace faster than a walk: ran the entire distance.
b. To cause (an animal) to move quickly or rapidly: ran the horse around the track.
c. To allow to move without restraint: We like to run the dogs along the beach.
d. To hunt or pursue; chase: dogs running deer.
2. To cause to move quickly: She ran her fingers along the keyboard.
3. Nautical To cause to move on a course: We ran our boat into a cove.
4. To cause to be in a given condition: The toddlers ran me ragged.
5.
a. To cause to compete in a race: He ran two horses in the Kentucky Derby.
b. To present or nominate for elective office: The party ran her for senator.
6.
a. To convey or transport: Run me into town. Run the garbage over to the dump.
b. Football To attempt to advance (the ball) by carrying it.
c. To smuggle: run guns.
7. To pass over or through: run the rapids; run a roadblock.
8.
a. To cause to flow: run water into a tub.
b. To be flowing with: The fountains ran champagne.
9. Metallurgy
a. To melt, fuse, or smelt (metal).
b. To mold or cast (molten metal): run gold into ingots.
10.
a. To cause to extend or pass: run a rope between the poles.
b. To mark or trace on a surface: run a pencil line between two points.
c. To sew with a continuous line of stitches: run a seam.
d. To cause to unravel along a line: She ran her stocking on a splinter.
11. To submit for consideration or review: I'll run the idea by you before I write the proposal.
12.
a. To continue to present or perform: ran the film for a month.
b. To publish in a periodical: run an advertisement.
13.
a. To cause to crash or collide: ran the car into a fence.
b. To cause to penetrate: I ran a pin into my thumb.
14.
a. To subject oneself or be subjected to: run a risk.
b. To have as an ongoing financial obligation: run a deficit; run a tab.
c. To be as a cost for; cost: Those hotel rooms can run you hundreds of dollars a night.
15. Games
a. To score (balls or points) consecutively in billiards: run 15 balls.
b. To clear (the table) in pool by consecutive scores.
16.
a. To cause to function; operate: run a machine.
b. To control, manage, or direct: ran the campaign by himself; a bureau that runs espionage operations.
c. To do or carry out: run errands; run an experiment.
17.
a. Computers To process or execute (a program or instruction).
b. To compare (data) with data in a database or other storage medium: The police ran the license plate number to see if the car was registered.
n.
1.
a. An act or period of running: How was your run this morning?
b. A pace faster than a walk: set off at a brisk run.
2.
a. A distance covered by running or traveling: a 10-mile run.
b. The time taken to cover such a distance: By taxi, it is a two minutes' run from the station.
c. A quick trip or visit: a run into town.
d. A scheduled or regular route: a delivery run.
e. A straight course or short distance followed by an aircraft before dropping a bomb on a target.
f. A stretch or period of riding, as in a race or to the hounds.
g. Sports The distance a golf ball rolls after hitting the ground.
h. Unrestricted freedom or use of an area: We had the run of the library.
3.
a. Sports A running race: the winner of the mile run.
b. A campaign for public office: She managed his successful senatorial run.
4. Baseball A point scored by advancing around the bases and reaching home plate safely.
5. Football A player's act of carrying the ball, usually for a specified distance: a 30-yard run.
6.
a. The migration of fish, especially in order to spawn.
b. A group or school of fish ascending a river in order to spawn.
7.
a. A track or slope along or down which something can travel: a logging run.
b. A pipe or channel through which something flows.
c. Sports A particular type of passage down a hill or across country experienced by an athlete, such as a skier or bobsledder: had two very good runs before the end of the day.
d. A trail or way made or frequented by animals.
e. An outdoor enclosure for domestic animals or poultry: a dog run.
f. Australian & New Zealand A tract of open land used for raising livestock; a ranch.
8.
a. A continuous length or extent of something: a five-foot run of tubing.
b. The direction, configuration, or lie of something: the run of the grain in leather.
c. Nautical The immersed part of a ship's hull abaft of the middle body.
d. A length of torn or unraveled stitches in a knitted fabric.
e. Geology A vein or seam, as of ore or rock.
9.
a. A continuous period of operation, especially of a machine or factory: gave the new furnace a run.
b. The production achieved during such a period: a press run of 15,000 copies.
c. Computers An execution of a specific program or instruction.
10.
a. A movement or flow: a run of sap.
b. The duration or amount of such a flow.
c. A drip of paint or a mark left by such a drip.
d. Eastern Lower Northern US See creek.
e. A fall or slide, as of sand or mud.
11.
a. An unbroken series or sequence: a run of dry summers.
b. Games A continuous sequence of playing cards in one suit.
c. An unbroken sequence or period of performances or presentations, as in the theater.
d. A successful sequence of actions, such as well-played shots or victories in a sport.
e. Music A rapid sequence of notes.
f. A series of unexpected and urgent demands, as by depositors or customers: a run on a bank.
12.
a. A sustained state or condition: a run of good luck.
b. A trend or tendency: the run of events.
13. The average type, group, or category: The broad run of voters want the candidate to win.
14. runs Informal Diarrhea. Often used with the.
adj.
1. Being in a melted or molten state: run butter; run gold.
2. Completely exhausted from running.
Phrasal Verbs:
run across
To find by chance; come upon.
run after
1. To pursue; chase.
2. To seek the company or attention of for purposes of courting: He finally became tired of running after her.
run against
1. To encounter unexpectedly; run into.
2. To work against; oppose: found public sentiment running against him.
run along
To go away; leave.
run away
1. To flee; escape.
2. To leave one's home, especially to elope.
3. To stampede.
run down
1. To stop because of lack of force or power: The alarm clock finally ran down.
2. To cause or allow (the time remaining in a sports contest) to elapse.
3. To make tired; cause to decline in vigor.
4.
a. To collide with and knock down: a pedestrian who was run down by a speeding motorist.
b. Nautical To collide with and cause to sink.
5. To chase and capture: Detectives ran down the suspects.
6. To trace the source of: The police ran down all possible leads in the case.
7. To disparage: Don't run her down; she is very talented.
8. To go over; review: run down a list once more.
9. Baseball To put a runner out after trapping him or her between two bases.
run in
1. To insert or include as something extra: ran in an illustration next to the first paragraph.
2. Printing To make a solid body of text without a paragraph or other break.
3. Slang To take into legal custody.
4. To pay a casual visit: We ran in for an hour.
run into
1. To meet or find by chance: ran into an old friend.
2. To encounter (something): ran into trouble.
3. To collide with.
4. To amount to: His net worth runs into seven figures.
run off
1. To print, duplicate, or copy: ran off 200 copies of the report.
2. To run away; elope.
3. To flow off; drain away.
4. To decide (a contest or competition) by a runoff.
5. To force or drive off (trespassers, for example).
run on
1. To keep going; continue.
2. To talk volubly, persistently, and usually inconsequentially: He is always running on about his tax problems.
3. To continue a text without a formal break.
run out
1. To become used up; be exhausted: Our supplies finally ran out.
2. To put out by force; compel to leave: We ran him out of town.
3. To become void, especially through the passage of time or an omission: an insurance policy that had run out.
4. To cause or allow (the time remaining in a sports contest) to elapse.
run over
1. To collide with, knock down, and often pass over: The car ran over a child.
2. To read or review quickly: run over a speech before giving it.
3. To flow over.
4. To go beyond a limit: The meeting ran over by 30 minutes.
run through
1. To pierce: The soldier was run through by a bayonet.
2. To use up quickly: She ran through all her money.
3. To rehearse quickly: Let's run through the first act again.
4. To go over the salient points or facts of: The crew ran through the preflight procedures. We ran through the witness's testimony before presenting it in court.
run up
To make or become greater or larger: ran up huge bills; run up the price of the company's stock.
run with
1. To keep company: runs with a wild crowd.
2. To take as one's own; adopt: "[He] was determined to run with the idea and go public before it had been researched" (Betty Cuniberti).
Idioms:
a run for (one's) money
Strong competition.
in the long run
In the final analysis or outcome.
in the short run
In the immediate future.
on the run
1.
a. In rapid retreat: guerrillas on the run after an ambush.
b. In hiding: fugitives on the run.
2. Hurrying busily from place to place: executives always on the run from New York to Los Angeles.
run a temperature/fever
To have a higher than normal body temperature.
run away with
1.
a. To make off with hurriedly.
b. To steal.
2. To be greater or bigger than others in (a performance, for example).
run foul/afoul of
1. To run into; collide with: a sloop that had run foul of the submerged reef.
2. To come into conflict with: a pickpocket who ran foul of the law.
run in place
To go through the movements of running without leaving one's original position.
run interference
To deal with problems or difficult matters for someone else.
run off at the mouth
To talk excessively or indiscreetly.
run off with
To capture or carry off: ran off with the state championship.
run (one's) eyes over
To look at or read in a cursory manner.
run out of
To exhaust the supply of: ran out of fuel.
run out of gas/steam Slang
1. To exhaust one's energy or enthusiasm.
2. To falter or come to a stop because of a lack of capital, support, or enthusiasm.
run out on
To abandon: has run out on the family.
run rings around
To be markedly superior to.
run scared Informal
To become intimidated or frightened.
run short
To become scanty or insufficient in supply: Fuel oil ran short during the winter.
run short of
To use up so that a supply becomes insufficient or scanty: ran short of paper clips.
run to earth/ground
1. To pursue (a hunted animal) to its den or lair.
2. To search for and find (someone or something).
3. To investigate (something) fully, usually with success.

[Middle English ernen, runnen, from Old English rinnan, eornan, earnan, and from Old Norse rinna; see rei- in Indo-European roots.]
Our Living Language Traditional terms for "a small, fast-flowing stream" vary throughout the eastern United States especially and are enshrined in many place names. Speakers in the eastern part of the Lower North (including Virginia, West Virginia, Delaware, Maryland, and southern Pennsylvania) use the word run. Speakers in the Hudson Valley and Catskills, the Dutch settlement areas of New York State, may call such a stream a kill. Brook has come to be used throughout the Northeast. Southerners refer to a branch, and throughout the rural northern United States the term is often crick, a variant of creek.

run off

vb (adverb)
1. (intr) to depart in haste
2. (tr) to produce quickly, as copies on a duplicating machine
3. to drain (liquid) or (of liquid) to be drained
4. (General Sporting Terms) (tr) to decide (a race) by a runoff
5. (tr) to get rid of (weight, etc) by running
6. (intr) (of a flow of liquid) to begin to dry up; cease to run
7. run off with
a. to steal; purloin
b. to elope with
n
8. (General Sporting Terms)
a. an extra race to decide the winner after a tie
b. a contest or election held after a previous one has failed to produce a clear victory for any one person
9. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy)
a. an extra race to decide the winner after a tie
b. a contest or election held after a previous one has failed to produce a clear victory for any one person
10. (Physical Geography) that portion of rainfall that runs into streams as surface water rather than being absorbed into ground water or evaporating
11. the overflow of a liquid from a container
12. (Agriculture) NZ grazing land for store cattle
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.run off - run awayrun off - run away; usually includes taking something or somebody along; "The thief made off with our silver"; "the accountant absconded with the cash from the safe"
levant - run off without paying a debt
flee, take flight, fly - run away quickly; "He threw down his gun and fled"
2.run off - leave suddenly and as if in a hurryrun off - leave suddenly and as if in a hurry; "The listeners bolted when he discussed his strange ideas"; "When she started to tell silly stories, I ran out"
go forth, leave, go away - go away from a place; "At what time does your train leave?"; "She didn't leave until midnight"; "The ship leaves at midnight"
3.run off - force to go awayrun off - force to go away; used both with concrete and metaphoric meanings; "Drive away potential burglars"; "drive away bad thoughts"; "dispel doubts"; "The supermarket had to turn back many disappointed customers"
frighten - drive out by frightening
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
fire - drive out or away by or as if by fire; "The soldiers were fired"; "Surrender fires the cold skepticism"
clear the air - dispel differences or negative emotions; "The group called a meeting to finally clear the air"
banish - drive away; "banish bad thoughts"; "banish gloom"
shoo, shoo away, shoo off - drive away by crying `shoo!'
drive out, rouse, rout out, force out - force or drive out; "The police routed them out of bed at 2 A.M."
4.run off - run away secretly with one's beloved; "The young couple eloped and got married in Las Vegas"
flee, take flight, fly - run away quickly; "He threw down his gun and fled"
5.run off - run off as waste; "The water wastes back into the ocean"
course, flow, run, feed - move along, of liquids; "Water flowed into the cave"; "the Missouri feeds into the Mississippi"
6.run off - reproduce by xerography
microcopy - photocopy printed or other graphic matter so that it is reduced in size
photostat - make a copy by means of a Photostat device
reproduce - make a copy or equivalent of; "reproduce the painting"
7.run off - decide (a contest or competition) by a runoff
game - a contest with rules to determine a winner; "you need four people to play this game"
compete, vie, contend - compete for something; engage in a contest; measure oneself against others
Translations
يَسْرُق، يَهْرُب مَعيَطْبَع حالا
utécivytisknout
løbe væk medtrykke
kinyom
hlaupast á brott meîprenta, fjölfalda
çoğaltmakfotokopi çekmekile kaçmak

run

(ran) present participle ˈrunning: past tense ran (rӕn) : past participle run verb
1. (of a person or animal) to move quickly, faster than walking. He ran down the road.
2. to move smoothly. Trains run on rails.
3. (of water etc) to flow. Rivers run to the sea; The tap is running.
4. (of a machine etc) to work or operate. The engine is running; He ran the motor to see if it was working.
5. to organize or manage. He runs the business very efficiently.
6. to race. Is your horse running this afternoon?
7. (of buses, trains etc) to travel regularly. The buses run every half hour; The train is running late.
8. to last or continue; to go on. The play ran for six weeks.
9. to own and use, especially of cars. He runs a Rolls Royce.
10. (of colour) to spread. When I washed my new dress the colour ran.
11. to drive (someone); to give (someone) a lift. He ran me to the station.
12. to move (something). She ran her fingers through his hair; He ran his eyes over the letter.
13. (in certain phrases) to be or become. The river ran dry; My blood ran cold (= I was afraid).
noun
1. the act of running. He went for a run before breakfast.
2. a trip or drive. We went for a run in the country.
3. a length of time (for which something continues). He's had a run of bad luck.
4. a ladder (in a stocking etc). I've got a run in my tights.
5. the free use (of a place). He gave me the run of his house.
6. in cricket, a batsman's act of running from one end of the wicket to the other, representing a single score. He scored/made 50 runs for his team.
7. an enclosure or pen. a chicken-run.
ˈrunner noun
1. a person who runs. There are five runners in this race.
2. the long narrow part on which a sledge etc moves. He polished the runners of the sledge; an ice-skate runner.
3. a long stem of a plant which puts down roots.
ˈrunning adjective
1. of or for running. running shoes.
2. continuous. a running commentary on the football match.
adverb
one after another; continuously. We travelled for four days running.
ˈrunny adjective
liquid; watery. Do you like your egg yolk firm or runny?; The baby has a runny nose.
ˈrunaway noun
a person, animal etc that runs away. The police caught the two runaways; (also adjective) a runaway horse.
ˌrunˈdown adjective
tired or exhausted because one has worked too hard. He feels run-down.
ˌrunner-ˈup noun
a person, thing etc that is second in a race or competition. My friend won the prize and I was the runner-up.
ˈrunway noun
a wide path from which aircraft take off and on which they land. The plane landed on the runway.
in/out of the running
having (no) chance of success. She's in the running for the job of director.
on the run
escaping; running away. He's on the run from the police.
run across
to meet. I ran across an old friend.
run after
to chase. The dog ran after a cat.
run aground
(of a ship) to become stuck on rocks etc.
run along
to go away. Run along now, children!
run away
1. to escape. He ran away from school.
2. (with with) to steal. He ran away with all her money.
3. (with with) to go too fast etc to be controlled by. The horse ran away with him.
run down
1. (of a clock, battery etc) to finish working. My watch has run down – it needs rewinding.
2. (of a vehicle or driver) to knock down. I was run down by a bus.
3. to speak badly of. He is always running me down.
run for
to stand for election for. He is running for president.
run for it
to try to escape. Quick – run for it!
run in
to get (a new engine etc) working properly.
run into
1. to meet. I ran into her in the street.
2. to crash into or collide with. The car ran into a lamp-post.
run its course
to develop or happen in the usual way. The fever ran its course.
run off
1. to print or copy. I want 500 copies run off at once.
2. (with with) to steal or take away. He ran off with my wife.
run out
1. (of a supply) to come to an end. The food has run out.
2. (with of) to have no more. We've run out of money.
run over
1. (of a vehicle or driver) to knock down or drive over. Don't let the dog out of the garden or he'll get run over.
2. to repeat for practice. Let's run over the plan again.
run a temperature
to have a fever.
run through
to look at, deal with etc, one after another. He ran through their instructions.
run to
to have enough money for. We can't run to a new car this year.
run up
1. to hoist (a flag).
2. to make quickly or roughly. I can run up a dress in a couple of hours.
3. to collect up, accumulate (debts). He ran up an enormous bill.
run wild
to go out of control. They let their children run wild; The garden was running wild.
References in classic literature ?
Wharton made extensive stylistic, punctuation, and spelling changes and revisions between the serial and book publication, and more than thirty subsequent changes were made after the second impression of the book edition had been run off.
There were accidents to machinery, the liability of trains to run off the line, collisions, bad weather, the blocking up by snow--were not all these against Phileas Fogg?
If she saw him she would run off at full speed and soon come back with something in a tin or basket, some hot soup or pudding Polly had ready.
To his dismay and astonishment he found a Giant lying at the entrance of the wood; he was about to run off as fast as his legs could carry him, when the Giant called out: 'Don't be afraid, I won't harm you.
Tarzan of the Apes had regained his civilized clothing from the tree where he had hidden it, and as Korak refused to enter the presence of his mother in the savage half-raiment that he had worn so long and as Meriem would not leave him, for fear, as she explained, that he would change his mind and run off into the jungle again, the father went on ahead to the bungalow for horses and clothes.
I saw the other one run off across the snow," Bill announced with cool positiveness.
And that's the reason I never would work for lonely widow old women ashore, when I kept my job-shop in the Vineyard; they might have taken it into their lonely old heads to run off with me.
But," he continued, in his fierce guttural tones, "if you run off with the red girl it is I who shall have to account to Tal Hajus; it is I who shall have to face Tars Tarkas, and either demonstrate my right to command, or the metal from my dead carcass will go to a better man, for such is the custom of the Tharks.
She sent Mercury, the messenger of the gods, to look for it, for she didn't dare leave the rainbow again, lest somebody should run off with that too.