runaway


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run·a·way

 (rŭn′ə-wā′)
n.
1. A person or animal that has run away.
2. Something that has escaped control or proper confinement.
3. Informal An easy victory.
adj.
1. Escaping or having escaped restraint, captivity, or control: runaway horses; runaway children.
2. Out of control: a runaway car; runaway inflation.
3. Easily won: a runaway victory.

runaway

(ˈrʌnəˌweɪ)
adj
1. denoting a vehicle or animal that is moving forward quickly, its driver or rider having lost control of it
2. denoting a situation in which something increases or develops very quickly and cannot be controlled
n
someone, esp a child, who leaves home without telling anyone or without permission

run•a•way

(ˈrʌn əˌweɪ)

n.
1. a person who runs away; fugitive; deserter.
2. a horse or team that has broken away.
3. the act of running away.
4. an easy victory.
5. a young person who has run away from home.
adj.
6. escaped; fugitive.
7. (esp. of a horse) having escaped control.
8. achieved by running away, esp. by eloping: a runaway marriage.
9. (of a contest) easily won.
10. unchecked; rampant: runaway prices.
11. deserting or revolting against one's group.
[1505–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.runaway - an easy victoryrunaway - an easy victory      
triumph, victory - a successful ending of a struggle or contest; "a narrow victory"; "the general always gets credit for his army's victory"; "clinched a victory"; "convincing victory"; "the agreement was a triumph for common sense"
2.runaway - someone who flees from an uncongenial situation; "fugitives from the sweatshops"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Adj.1.runaway - completely out of control; "runaway inflation"
uncontrolled - not being under control; out of control; "the greatest uncontrolled health problem is AIDS"; "uncontrolled growth"

runaway

adjective
1. easily won, easy, effortless a runaway success
2. out of control, uncontrolled, driverless The runaway car careered into a bench.
3. escaped, wild, fleeing, loose, fugitive a runaway horse
4. uncontrolled, out of control, rampant, unchecked Such a mix of policies would normally lead to runaway inflation.
noun

runaway

noun
1. One who flees, as from home, confinement, captivity, or justice:
2. Informal. An easy victory:
Slang: romp.
adjective
1. Fleeing or having fled, as from home, confinement, captivity, or justice:
2. Out of control:
Idioms: out of hand, running wild.
Translations
هارِب، شارِد، جامِح
-iceuprchlíkuprchlý
bortløben
strokumaîur

runaway

[ˈrʌnəweɪ]
A. ADJ [prisoner, slave] → fugitivo; [soldier] → desertor; [horse] → desbocado; [lorry] → sin frenos, fuera de control; [inflation] → galopante, desenfrenado; [success] → arrollador; [victory] → aplastante, abrumador; [marriage] → clandestino, fugitivo
B. N (= person) → fugitivo/a m/f; (= horse) → caballo m desbocado

runaway

[ˈrʌnəweɪ]
adj
[horse] → emballé(e)
[truck, car] → fou(folle)
[inflation] → galopant(e)
[success] → monstre; [victory, winner] → haut la main
to be a runaway success → avoir un succès monstre
nfugueur/euse m/f

runaway

nAusreißer(in) m(f)
adj
slaveentlaufen; person, couple, horsedurchgebrannt (inf), → ausgerissen; a runaway car/trainein Auto/ein Zug, das/der sich selbstständig gemacht hat; the runaway childder kleine Ausreißer; they planned a runaway weddingsie beschlossen, wegzulaufen und zu heiraten
(fig: = unstoppable) winnerüberragend; inflationunkontrollierbar; a runaway successein Riesenerfolg m, → ein voller Erfolg; the runaway bestsellerder mit Abstand erfolgreichste Bestseller; he had a runaway victoryer hatte einen sehr leichten Sieg; she was the runaway winner of the championshipsie gewann die Meisterschaften mit großem Abstand

runaway

[ˈrʌnəˌweɪ]
1. adj (slave, person) → in fuga; (child) → scappato/a di casa; (truck, train) → fuori controllo; (horse) → imbizzarrito/a; (success, victory) → trascinante
runaway inflation → inflazione f galoppante
2. nfuggitivo/a, fuggiasco/a

run

(ran) present participle ˈrunning: past tense ran (rӕn) : past participle run verb
1. (of a person or animal) to move quickly, faster than walking. He ran down the road.
2. to move smoothly. Trains run on rails.
3. (of water etc) to flow. Rivers run to the sea; The tap is running.
4. (of a machine etc) to work or operate. The engine is running; He ran the motor to see if it was working.
5. to organize or manage. He runs the business very efficiently.
6. to race. Is your horse running this afternoon?
7. (of buses, trains etc) to travel regularly. The buses run every half hour; The train is running late.
8. to last or continue; to go on. The play ran for six weeks.
9. to own and use, especially of cars. He runs a Rolls Royce.
10. (of colour) to spread. When I washed my new dress the colour ran.
11. to drive (someone); to give (someone) a lift. He ran me to the station.
12. to move (something). She ran her fingers through his hair; He ran his eyes over the letter.
13. (in certain phrases) to be or become. The river ran dry; My blood ran cold (= I was afraid).
noun
1. the act of running. He went for a run before breakfast.
2. a trip or drive. We went for a run in the country.
3. a length of time (for which something continues). He's had a run of bad luck.
4. a ladder (in a stocking etc). I've got a run in my tights.
5. the free use (of a place). He gave me the run of his house.
6. in cricket, a batsman's act of running from one end of the wicket to the other, representing a single score. He scored/made 50 runs for his team.
7. an enclosure or pen. a chicken-run.
ˈrunner noun
1. a person who runs. There are five runners in this race.
2. the long narrow part on which a sledge etc moves. He polished the runners of the sledge; an ice-skate runner.
3. a long stem of a plant which puts down roots.
ˈrunning adjective
1. of or for running. running shoes.
2. continuous. a running commentary on the football match.
adverb
one after another; continuously. We travelled for four days running.
ˈrunny adjective
liquid; watery. Do you like your egg yolk firm or runny?; The baby has a runny nose.
ˈrunaway noun
a person, animal etc that runs away. The police caught the two runaways; (also adjective) a runaway horse.
ˌrunˈdown adjective
tired or exhausted because one has worked too hard. He feels run-down.
ˌrunner-ˈup noun
a person, thing etc that is second in a race or competition. My friend won the prize and I was the runner-up.
ˈrunway noun
a wide path from which aircraft take off and on which they land. The plane landed on the runway.
in/out of the running
having (no) chance of success. She's in the running for the job of director.
on the run
escaping; running away. He's on the run from the police.
run across
to meet. I ran across an old friend.
run after
to chase. The dog ran after a cat.
run aground
(of a ship) to become stuck on rocks etc.
run along
to go away. Run along now, children!
run away
1. to escape. He ran away from school.
2. (with with) to steal. He ran away with all her money.
3. (with with) to go too fast etc to be controlled by. The horse ran away with him.
run down
1. (of a clock, battery etc) to finish working. My watch has run down – it needs rewinding.
2. (of a vehicle or driver) to knock down. I was run down by a bus.
3. to speak badly of. He is always running me down.
run for
to stand for election for. He is running for president.
run for it
to try to escape. Quick – run for it!
run in
to get (a new engine etc) working properly.
run into
1. to meet. I ran into her in the street.
2. to crash into or collide with. The car ran into a lamp-post.
run its course
to develop or happen in the usual way. The fever ran its course.
run off
1. to print or copy. I want 500 copies run off at once.
2. (with with) to steal or take away. He ran off with my wife.
run out
1. (of a supply) to come to an end. The food has run out.
2. (with of) to have no more. We've run out of money.
run over
1. (of a vehicle or driver) to knock down or drive over. Don't let the dog out of the garden or he'll get run over.
2. to repeat for practice. Let's run over the plan again.
run a temperature
to have a fever.
run through
to look at, deal with etc, one after another. He ran through their instructions.
run to
to have enough money for. We can't run to a new car this year.
run up
1. to hoist (a flag).
2. to make quickly or roughly. I can run up a dress in a couple of hours.
3. to collect up, accumulate (debts). He ran up an enormous bill.
run wild
to go out of control. They let their children run wild; The garden was running wild.

runaway

n niño -ña mf que ha abandonado el hogar
References in classic literature ?
After that he had sheltered no more runaway Malaita men.
He had once been guilty of sheltering three runaways from Berande.
He was a husky youngster of seventeen, a runaway apprentice, he told me, from an English ship in Australia.
On emerging from the Bastille, Gringoire descended the Rue Saint-Antoine with the swiftness of a runaway horse.
While they were thus waiting, and the savages came on, they plainly saw that one of the three was the runaway savage that had escaped from them; and they both knew him distinctly, and resolved that, if possible, he should not escape, though they should both fire; so the other stood ready with his piece, that if he did not drop at the first shot, he should be sure to have a second.
At last, by sheer luck, a Carabineer[2] happened along, who, hearing all that noise, thought that it might be a runaway colt, and stood bravely in the middle of the street, with legs wide apart, firmly resolved to stop it and prevent any trouble.
The friendliness with which he was received at the Glandier may be explained by the fact that he had once rendered Mademoiselle Stangerson a great service by stopping, at the peril of his own life, the runaway horses of her carriage.
But before night they changed around and judged it was done by a runaway nigger named Jim.
WELL, it was the next spring after me and Tom Sawyer set our old nigger Jim free, the time he was chained up for a runaway slave down there on Tom's uncle Silas's farm in Arkansaw.
If he wonders you didn't tell him before, say it's a runaway match, and the bride is waiting for you.
The world welcomed me back, and I returned the compliment by sulking like the recaptured runaway I was at heart.
Whoever you are, good people' (she says), 'a hundred pounds reward, if you find the runaway murderer.