ruse


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Ru·se

 (ro͝o′sā)
A city of northeast Bulgaria on the Danube River south of Bucharest, Romania. Founded as a Roman fortress, it is today a major port and industrial center.

ruse

 (ro͞oz, ro͞os)
n.
A crafty stratagem; a subterfuge. See Synonyms at wile.

[Middle English, detour, dodging, from Old French, from ruser, to drive back; see rush1.]

ruse

(ruːz)
n
an action intended to mislead, deceive, or trick; stratagem
[C15: from Old French: trick, esp to evade capture, from ruser to retreat, from Latin recūsāre to refuse]

Ruse

(ˈruːseɪ)
n
(Placename) a city in NE Bulgaria, on the River Danube: the chief river port and one of the largest industrial centres in Bulgaria. Pop: 172 000 (2005 est)

ruse

(ruz)

n.
a trick, stratagem, or artifice: He used a ruse to get past the sentry.
[1375–1425; late Middle English: roundabout course < Middle French, derivative of ruser to retreat. See rush1]
syn: See trick.

Ru•se

(ˈru seɪ)

n.
a city in N Bulgaria, on the Danube. 172,782.

ruse

In military deception, a trick of war designed to deceive the adversary, usually involving the deliberate exposure of false information to the adversary's intelligence collection system.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ruse - a deceptive maneuver (especially to avoid capture)ruse - a deceptive maneuver (especially to avoid capture)
tactical maneuver, tactical manoeuvre, maneuver, manoeuvre - a move made to gain a tactical end

ruse

noun trick, deception, ploy, hoax, device, manoeuvre, dodge, sham, artifice, blind, subterfuge, stratagem, wile, imposture This was a ruse to divide them.

ruse

noun
An indirect, usually cunning means of gaining an end:
Informal: shenanigan, take-in.
Translations
حيلَه، خِدْعَه
lestúskočnostúskok
kneb
bragî, klækur
gudrībaviltīgs plāns

ruse

[ruːz] Nardid m, treta f, estratagema f

ruse

[ˈruːz] nruse f

ruse

nList f

ruse

[ruːz] n (frm) → stratagemma m, astuzia

ruse

(ruːz) noun
a clever trick or plan.
References in classic literature ?
My lords and ladies, pardon the ruse by which I have gathered you here to witness the marriage of my daughter.
In her little bundle she had provided a store of cakes and apples, which she used as expedients for quickening the speed of the child, rolling the apple some yards before them, when the boy would run with all his might after it; and this ruse, often repeated, carried them over many a half-mile.
On arriving at the spot, I was much inclined to suspect that the whole story was a ruse to make us SLOWWK and drink the more at the Handeck Inn, for only a few planks had been carried away, and though there might perhaps have been some difficulty with mules, the gap was certainly not larger than a MMBGLX might cross with a very slight leap.
This ruse will be discovered later," he cheerfully explained, "when they check up my weights, measurements, and other personal identification data, but it will be several months before this is done and our mission should be accomplished or have failed long before that time.
This posing at the piano and over the album was only a little ruse adopted by way of precaution.
Indeed, it is a likely ruse enough," observed Bradstreet thoughtfully.
It seemed hopeless to pursue the inquiry any farther, but it was clear that in spite of Holmes's ruse we had no proof that Barrymore had not been in London all the time.
As to the small ruse which I played upon you in the matter of the envelope, it is clear that, had I told you all my intentions, I should have been forced to resist unwelcome pressure to travel out with you.
It sometimes seemed as if she planned every word she spoke or caused to be spoken; as if all this worry about cabs and change had been a ruse to surprise the soul.
The fellow whose ruse had put me down was springing toward me, the point of his gleaming blade directed straight at my heart, and as he came there rang from his lips the cruel and mocking peal of laughter that I had heard within the Chamber of Mystery.
He added with the air of a profound thinker, "One is indebted sometimes to fortune, sometimes to ruse, for the happy issue of great enterprises.
But he was ashamed; he would look such a fool in his own eyes if he gave in now; his uncle would chuckle at the success of the headmaster's ruse.