ruse


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Ru·se

 (ro͝o′sā)
A city of northeast Bulgaria on the Danube River south of Bucharest, Romania. Founded as a Roman fortress, it is today a major port and industrial center.

ruse

 (ro͞oz, ro͞os)
n.
A crafty stratagem; a subterfuge. See Synonyms at wile.

[Middle English, detour, dodging, from Old French, from ruser, to drive back; see rush1.]

ruse

(ruːz)
n
an action intended to mislead, deceive, or trick; stratagem
[C15: from Old French: trick, esp to evade capture, from ruser to retreat, from Latin recūsāre to refuse]

Ruse

(ˈruːseɪ)
n
(Placename) a city in NE Bulgaria, on the River Danube: the chief river port and one of the largest industrial centres in Bulgaria. Pop: 172 000 (2005 est)

ruse

(ruz)

n.
a trick, stratagem, or artifice: He used a ruse to get past the sentry.
[1375–1425; late Middle English: roundabout course < Middle French, derivative of ruser to retreat. See rush1]
syn: See trick.

Ru•se

(ˈru seɪ)

n.
a city in N Bulgaria, on the Danube. 172,782.

ruse

In military deception, a trick of war designed to deceive the adversary, usually involving the deliberate exposure of false information to the adversary's intelligence collection system.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ruse - a deceptive maneuver (especially to avoid capture)ruse - a deceptive maneuver (especially to avoid capture)
tactical maneuver, tactical manoeuvre, maneuver, manoeuvre - a move made to gain a tactical end

ruse

noun trick, deception, ploy, hoax, device, manoeuvre, dodge, sham, artifice, blind, subterfuge, stratagem, wile, imposture This was a ruse to divide them.

ruse

noun
An indirect, usually cunning means of gaining an end:
Informal: shenanigan, take-in.
Translations
حيلَه، خِدْعَه
lestúskočnostúskok
kneb
bragî, klækur
gudrībaviltīgs plāns

ruse

[ruːz] Nardid m, treta f, estratagema f

ruse

[ˈruːz] nruse f

ruse

nList f

ruse

[ruːz] n (frm) → stratagemma m, astuzia

ruse

(ruːz) noun
a clever trick or plan.
References in classic literature ?
The Sagoths were now not over two hundred and fifty yards behind us, and I saw that it was hopeless for us to expect to escape other than by a ruse.
As soon as Bonaparte (who was at Schonbrunn, sixteen miles from Hollabrunn) received Murat's dispatch with the proposal of a truce and a capitulation, he detected a ruse and wrote the following letter to Murat:
That I spake of sacrifices and honey-sacrifices, it was merely a ruse in talking and verily, a useful folly
Our only hope lies in traveling northward as rapidly as we may, of coming to the camp of the raiders before the knowledge of Achmet Zek's death reaches those who were left there, and of obtaining, through some ruse, an escort toward the north.
very likely a ruse to get rid of guests who had certainly been behaving as though the Lodge was their permanent home.
Jeering at the White Logic, I go out to join my guests at table, and with assumed seriousness to discuss the current magazines and the silly doings of the world's day, whipping every trick and ruse of controversy through all the paces of paradox and persiflage.
Then Charley's lagging imagination quickened sufficiently to suggest a ruse.
It sometimes seemed as if she planned every word she spoke or caused to be spoken; as if all this worry about cabs and change had been a ruse to surprise the soul.
I knew though that my ruse had worked and that temporarily at least Thuvia and Tars Tarkas were safe, and the means of escape was theirs.
The more she thought of the matter, the more convinced she became that the recent telephone message might be but a ruse to keep them inactive until the boy was safely hidden away or spirited out of England.
Norman of Torn could scarce repress a smile at this clever ruse of the old priest, and, assuming a similar attitude, he replied in French:
My lords and ladies, pardon the ruse by which I have gathered you here to witness the marriage of my daughter.