rushed


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Related to rushed: waylaid

rush 1

 (rŭsh)
v. rushed, rush·ing, rush·es
v.intr.
1. To move swiftly; hurry: rushed after the bus.
2. To act with great haste: rushed to finish the project.
3. To make a sudden or swift attack or charge: The cavalry rushed down upon the encampment.
4. To flow or surge rapidly, often with noise: Water rushed over the cliff.
5. Football To advance the ball or attempt to advance the ball from scrimmage by carrying it rather than passing.
v.tr.
1. To cause to move rapidly: had to rush fresh troops to the front lines.
2. To cause to act with haste: made a mistake because we were rushed.
3. To perform with great haste: had to rush the project to complete it on time.
4. To attack swiftly and suddenly: Infantry rushed the enemy after the artillery barrage.
5. To transport or carry hastily: An ambulance rushed her to the hospital.
6. To entertain or pay great attention to: They rushed him for their fraternity.
7. Football To run toward (a passer or kicker) in order to block or disrupt a play.
n.
1. A sudden movement toward something: a rush to leave the room.
2.
a. An anxious and eager movement to get to or from a place: a rush to the goldfields.
b. A sudden widespread demand: a rush for gold coins.
3. General haste or busyness: The office always operates in a rush.
4. A sudden attack; an onslaught.
5. A rapid, often noisy flow or passage: listened to the rush of the wind.
6. A large or overwhelming number or amount: a rush of last-minute holiday orders.
7. Football
a. An attempt to advance the ball from scrimmage by carrying it.
b. An act of running at a passer or kicker in order to block or prevent a play.
8. Sports A rapid advance of the puck toward the opponent's goal in ice hockey.
9. rushes The first, unedited print of a movie scene.
10. A drive by a Greek society on a college campus to recruit new members: a sorority rush.
11.
a. A surge or release of emotion: felt a rush of fear. See Synonyms at flow.
b. A sudden, brief exhilaration: felt a heady rush when her name was called out as the winner.
c. The intensely pleasurable sensation experienced immediately after use of a stimulant or a mind-altering drug.
adj.
Performed with or requiring great haste or urgency: a rush job; a rush order.

[Middle English rushen, from Anglo-Norman russher, variant of Old French ruser, to drive back, from Latin recūsāre, to reject : re-, re- + causārī, to give as a reason (from causa, cause).]

rush′er n.

rush 2

 (rŭsh)
n.
1.
a. Any of various grasslike wetland plants of the genus Juncus, having stiff hollow or pithy stems and small usually clustered brownish flowers.
b. Any of various similar plants, such as a bulrush.
2. The stem of one of these plants, used in making baskets, mats, and chair seats.

[Middle English, from Old English rysc.]

rushed

(rʌʃt)
adj
undertaken quickly or without much care; hurried(of a person) forced to do something quickly or without much careto be extremely busy
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.rushed - done under pressure; "a rush job"
hurried - moving rapidly or performed quickly or in great haste; "a hurried trip to the store"; "the hurried life of a city"; "a hurried job"

rushed

adjective
2. hurried, frantic, in a hurry, pressed for time, pushed for time At no time did I feel rushed.
Translations

rushed

[rʌʃt] ADJ I didn't feel rushed or under pressureno sentí que me estuvieran metiendo prisa or presionando, no me sentí presionado or (LAm) apurado
breakfast had been a rushed affairhabíamos desayunado a toda prisa or a todo correr or a la carrera

rushed

[ˈrʌʃt] adj
(= hurried) [job, work] → bâclé(e); [meal] → sur le pouce
(= busy) → débordé(e)
to feel rushed → se sentir débordé
to be rushed off one's feet → être complètement débordérush hour nheures fpl de pointe
in the rush hour → aux heures de pointerush-hour traffic ncirculation f aux heures de pointerush job ntravail m urgentrush matting nnatte f de jonc

rushed

adj
(= hurried) mealhastig; decisionübereilt
(= busy)gehetzt
References in classic literature ?
With wonderful presence of mind, Don Pedro, the cruel sire, rushed in, dragged out his daughter, with a hasty aside.
Out of the tents rushed the young men to find Professor Bumper and Mr.
Heyward had given one of his pistols to Hawkeye, and together they rushed down a little declivity toward their foes; they discharged their weapons at the same instant, and equally without success.
In the decline of the day, near Kentucke river, as we ascended the brow of a small hill, a number of Indians rushed out of a thick cane-brake upon us, and made us prisoners.
The blood, that had forsaken her astonished face, rushed as quickly back.
Without giving herself time for a second thought, she rushed into the shop, pale, wild, desperate in gesture and expression, scowling portentously, and looking far better qualified to do fierce battle with a housebreaker than to stand smiling behind the counter, bartering small wares for a copper recompense.
The next instant, back it all rushed again, with still a deeper throb of pain; for, in that brief interval, she had sinned anew.
Nothing was done, and nothing seemed capable of being done; those on deck rushed towards the bows, and stood eyeing the boom as if it were the lower jaw of an exasperated whale.
Meantime, they hauled more and more upon their lines, till close flanking him on both sides, Stubb answered Flask with lance for lance; and thus round and round the Pequod the battle went, while the multitudes of sharks that had before swum round the Sperm Whale's body, rushed to the fresh blood that was spilled, thirstily drinking at every new gash, as the eager Israelites did at the new bursting fountains that poured from the smitten rock.
He tore his way through his persecutors, flinging one of them clear over the parapet; he bowled a horse and his rider down, and plunged straight for the next, got home with his horns, wounding both horse and man; on again, here and there and this way and that; and one after another he tore the bowels out of two horses so that they gushed to the ground, and ripped a third one so badly that although they rushed him to cover and shoved his bowels back and stuffed the rents with tow and rode him against the bull again, he couldn't make the trip; he tried to gallop, under the spur, but soon reeled and tottered and fell, all in a heap.
On and on they drove through the darkness, and though the rain stopped, the wind rushed by and whistled and made strange sounds.
I rushed at her howling like a wolf, and I snatched the mealies from her head and the kid from her hand.