rushes


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Related to rushes: Gold rushes

rush 1

 (rŭsh)
v. rushed, rush·ing, rush·es
v.intr.
1. To move swiftly; hurry: rushed after the bus.
2. To act with great haste: rushed to finish the project.
3. To make a sudden or swift attack or charge: The cavalry rushed down upon the encampment.
4. To flow or surge rapidly, often with noise: Water rushed over the cliff.
5. Football To advance the ball or attempt to advance the ball from scrimmage by carrying it rather than passing.
v.tr.
1. To cause to move rapidly: had to rush fresh troops to the front lines.
2. To cause to act with haste: made a mistake because we were rushed.
3. To perform with great haste: had to rush the project to complete it on time.
4. To attack swiftly and suddenly: Infantry rushed the enemy after the artillery barrage.
5. To transport or carry hastily: An ambulance rushed her to the hospital.
6. To entertain or pay great attention to: They rushed him for their fraternity.
7. Football To run toward (a passer or kicker) in order to block or disrupt a play.
n.
1. A sudden movement toward something: a rush to leave the room.
2.
a. An anxious and eager movement to get to or from a place: a rush to the goldfields.
b. A sudden widespread demand: a rush for gold coins.
3. General haste or busyness: The office always operates in a rush.
4. A sudden attack; an onslaught.
5. A rapid, often noisy flow or passage: listened to the rush of the wind.
6. A large or overwhelming number or amount: a rush of last-minute holiday orders.
7. Football
a. An attempt to advance the ball from scrimmage by carrying it.
b. An act of running at a passer or kicker in order to block or prevent a play.
8. Sports A rapid advance of the puck toward the opponent's goal in ice hockey.
9. rushes The first, unedited print of a movie scene.
10. A drive by a Greek society on a college campus to recruit new members: a sorority rush.
11.
a. A surge or release of emotion: felt a rush of fear. See Synonyms at flow.
b. A sudden, brief exhilaration: felt a heady rush when her name was called out as the winner.
c. The intensely pleasurable sensation experienced immediately after use of a stimulant or a mind-altering drug.
adj.
Performed with or requiring great haste or urgency: a rush job; a rush order.

[Middle English rushen, from Anglo-Norman russher, variant of Old French ruser, to drive back, from Latin recūsāre, to reject : re-, re- + causārī, to give as a reason (from causa, cause).]

rush′er n.

rush 2

 (rŭsh)
n.
1.
a. Any of various grasslike wetland plants of the genus Juncus, having stiff hollow or pithy stems and small usually clustered brownish flowers.
b. Any of various similar plants, such as a bulrush.
2. The stem of one of these plants, used in making baskets, mats, and chair seats.

[Middle English, from Old English rysc.]

rushes

(rʌʃɪz)
pl n
(Film) (sometimes singular) (in film-making) the initial prints of a scene or scenes before editing, usually prepared daily

rushes

Unedited footage, usually screened at the end of a day’s filming.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
And then the little sleeves were carefully rolled up, and the little arms were plunged in elbow-deep to get the rushes a good long way down before breaking them off--and for a while Alice forgot all about the Sheep and the knitting, as she bent over the side of the boat, with just the ends of her tangled hair dipping into the water--while with bright eager eyes she caught at one bunch after another of the darling scented rushes.
There was a flash of the great sword as the outlaw swung it to the full of his mighty strength through an arc that passed above the shoulders of Peter of Colfax, and the grinning head rolled upon the floor, while the loathsome carcass, that had been a baron of England, sunk in a disheveled heap among the rushes of the great hall of the castle of Leybourn.
Pickles nearly had a fit, he barked and he barked and made little rushes.