sabermetrician


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sabermetrician

(ˌseɪbəməˈtrɪʃən)
n
(Baseball) someone who practises sabermetrics
References in periodicals archive ?
1 Sabermetrician Bill _______ is now an adviser with the Red Sox
Soon after, Dewan met Dick Cramer, a fellow programming sabermetrician.
A baseball fan who was not already a sabermetrician (2) will see the game differently after reading Moneyball.
Before Silver used his statistical powers for politics, he used them as a sabermetrician for predicting baseball outcomes.
The Signal and the Noise Why So Many Predictions Fail--But Some Don't | NATE SILVER: Silver, an American statistician, sabermetrician (one who analyzes baseball statistics--we had to look that one up), psephologist (one who scientifically analyzes elections; we looked that one up, too), and writer, explores the world of prediction--from the NBA to the stock market.
At the end of the day, you need good scouts, a good sabermetrician, a good general manager, a president willing to decentralize the decision-making process, and you have to have some luck, and the Rockies haven't put it together.
Yet even as this critique of the existing order has gained credibility--Bill James, the most famous sabermetrician, was a best-selling author as far back as the late 1980s, while Michael Lewis's book Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, which profiled one of the few general managers to take sabermetric ideas seriously, was a huge hit in 2003--sabermetricians and their ideas have made little headway with most of baseball's decision makers, who dismiss them as stat geeks and Rotisserie nerds (which, to be fair, more than a few of them are).
ESPN sabermetrician Rob Neyer crunched the numbers and found that Sizemore's career are most closely resembles Duke Snider--another Hall of Famer.
But Thorn's famous partnership with sabermetrician Pete Palmer was well-struck within moments of their first meeting in 1981 at the opening reception for the 1981 SABR Convention.
We live in an environment now where there's a lot of open data, which makes people less tolerant of letting people be gatekeepers," argues Silver, who at Baseball Prospectus was a top sabermetrician and has since abandoned baseball metrics in favor of predicting elections for the New York Times.
In 1971, those interested in doing statistical analysis to study the game of baseball already existed, but since SABR had just been created, the term sabermetrician hadn't yet been coined.