sack

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sack 1

 (săk)
n.
1.
a. A bag, especially one made of strong material for holding grain or objects in bulk.
b. The amount that a sack can hold: sold two sacks of rice.
2. also sacque A short loose-fitting garment for women and children.
3. Slang Dismissal from employment: finally got the sack after a year of ineptitude.
4. Informal A bed, mattress, or sleeping bag: hit the sack at 10:00.
5. Baseball A base.
6. Football A successful attempt at sacking the quarterback.
tr.v. sacked, sack·ing, sacks
1. To place into a sack: sacked the groceries.
2. Slang To discharge from employment: sacked the workers who were caught embezzling. See Synonyms at dismiss.
3. Football To tackle (a quarterback attempting to pass the ball) behind the line of scrimmage.
Phrasal Verb:
sack out Slang
To sleep.

[Middle English, from Old English sacc, from Latin saccus, from Greek sakkos, of Semitic origin; see śqq in Semitic roots.]
Word History: The ordinary word sack carries within it a few thousand years of commercial history. The Greeks got their word sakkos, "a bag made out of coarse cloth or hair," from the Phoenicians with whom they traded. The Phoenician word does not happen to be attested in any Phoenician writings that survive from antiquity, but words related to it can be found in the other Semitic languages, such as Hebrew śaq and Akkadian saqqu. The Greeks then passed the sack, as it were, to the Romans as Latin saccus, "a large bag or sack." The Latin word was then transmitted to the Germanic tribes with whom the Romans traded, and they gave it the form *sakkiz. (Similarly, many other languages of Europe, including Irish, Welsh, Albanian, Hungarian, Czech, Polish, and Russian, also have words derived from Greek sakkos or Latin saccus.) The speakers of Old English used two forms of the word, sæcc, meaning "sackcloth" and descending from Germanic *sakkiz, as well as sacc, meaning "a sack, a bag" and borrowed directly from Latin. The second Old English form is the ancestor of our sack.

sack 2

 (săk)
tr.v. sacked, sack·ing, sacks
To rob (a town, for example) of goods or valuables, especially after capture.
n.
The looting or pillaging of a captured city or town.

[Probably from French (mettre à) sac, (to put in) a sack, from Old French sac, sack, from Latin saccus, sack, bag; see sack1.]

sack 3

 (săk)
n.
Any of various light, dry, strong wines from Spain and the Canary Islands, imported to England in the 1500s and 1600s.

[From French (vin) sec, dry (wine), from Old French, from Latin siccus, dry.]

sack

(sæk)
n
1. a large bag made of coarse cloth, thick paper, etc, used as a container
2. Also called: sackful the amount contained in a sack, sometimes used as a unit of measurement
3. (Clothing & Fashion)
a. a woman's loose tube-shaped dress
b. Also called: sacque a woman's full loose hip-length jacket, worn in the 18th and mid-20th centuries
4. short for rucksack
5. (Cricket) cricket Austral a run scored off a ball not struck by the batsman: allotted to the team as an extra and not to the individual batsman. Also called (in Britain and certain other countries): bye
6. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) the sack informal dismissal from employment
7. a slang word for bed
8. hit the sack slang to go to bed
9. rough as sacks NZ uncouth
vb (tr)
10. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) informal to dismiss from employment
11. to put into a sack or sacks
[Old English sacc, from Latin saccus bag, from Greek sakkos; related to Hebrew saq]
ˈsackˌlike adj

sack

(sæk)
n
1. the plundering of a place by an army or mob, usually involving destruction, slaughter, etc
2. (Soccer) American football a tackle on a quarterback which brings him down before he has passed the ball
3. (Rugby) American football a tackle on a quarterback which brings him down before he has passed the ball
vb
4. (tr) to plunder and partially destroy (a place)
5. (American Football) American football to tackle and bring down a quarterback before he has passed the ball
[C16: from French phrase mettre à sac, literally: to put (loot) in a sack, from Latin saccus sack1]
ˈsacker n

sack

(sæk)
n
(Brewing) archaic or trademark any dry white wine formerly imported into Britain from SW Europe
[C16 wyne seck, from French vin sec dry wine, from Latin siccus dry]

sack1

(sæk)

n.
1. a large bag of strong, coarsely woven material, as for grain, potatoes, or coal.
2. the amount a sack holds.
3. a bag: a sack of candy.
4. Slang. dismissal, as from a job: to get the sack.
5. Slang. bed.
6. Also, sacque.
a. a loose-fitting dress, esp. one fashionable in the late 17th–18th century.
b. a loose-fitting coat, jacket, or cape.
7. Baseball. a base.
v.t.
8. to put into a sack or sacks.
9. Football. to tackle (the quarterback) behind the line of scrimmage before the quarterback is able to throw a pass.
10. Slang. to dismiss or discharge, as from a job.
11. sack out, Slang. to go to bed; fall asleep.
[before 1000; Middle English sak (n.), sakken (v.), Old English sacc (n.) < Latin saccus bag, sackcloth < Greek sákkos < Semitic; compare Hebrew śaq, Akkadian šaqqu]
sack′er, n.

sack2

(sæk)

v.t.
1. to pillage or loot (a place) after capture; plunder.
n.
2. the plundering of a captured place: the sack of Troy.
[1540–50; < Middle French phrase mettre à sac to put to pillage; sac in this sense < Italian sacco looting, loot]
sack′er, n.

sack3

(sæk)

n.
a strong white wine formerly imported by England from Spain and the Canary Islands.
[1525–35; < French (vin) sec dry (wine) < Latin siccus dry; compare sec]

sack

  • sachet - Etymologically, a "little sack"—a small packet of perfumed matter.
  • cul-de-sac - Literally French for "bottom of a sack," it also means "situation from which there is no escape"; it can be pluralized as cul-de-sacs or culs-de-sac.
  • gunny - From Sanskrit goni, "sack," it is the material used for sacks, made from jute or sunn-hemp.
  • haversack, knapsack, rucksack - Haversack is from German Haber, "oats," and Sack, "bag, sack"; knapsack is from German knapper, "to bite (food)" and zak, "sack"; rucksack comes from German Rucken, "back," and sack.

sack

A sack is a large container made of rough woven material. Sacks are used to carry and store things such as potatoes and coal.

1. 'bag' and 'sack'

In British English, you do not use sack to refer to a small container made of paper, or to a container with handles for putting shopping or personal possessions in. Containers like these are called bags.

See bag

In American English, sack can be used to describe a small container made of paper.

The woman gave Kelly the total and put all her purchases in a paper sack.
2. 'pocket'

You also do not use sack to refer to the parts of your clothes in which you carry money and other small articles. These parts are called pockets.

sack


Past participle: sacked
Gerund: sacking

Imperative
sack
sack
Present
I sack
you sack
he/she/it sacks
we sack
you sack
they sack
Preterite
I sacked
you sacked
he/she/it sacked
we sacked
you sacked
they sacked
Present Continuous
I am sacking
you are sacking
he/she/it is sacking
we are sacking
you are sacking
they are sacking
Present Perfect
I have sacked
you have sacked
he/she/it has sacked
we have sacked
you have sacked
they have sacked
Past Continuous
I was sacking
you were sacking
he/she/it was sacking
we were sacking
you were sacking
they were sacking
Past Perfect
I had sacked
you had sacked
he/she/it had sacked
we had sacked
you had sacked
they had sacked
Future
I will sack
you will sack
he/she/it will sack
we will sack
you will sack
they will sack
Future Perfect
I will have sacked
you will have sacked
he/she/it will have sacked
we will have sacked
you will have sacked
they will have sacked
Future Continuous
I will be sacking
you will be sacking
he/she/it will be sacking
we will be sacking
you will be sacking
they will be sacking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been sacking
you have been sacking
he/she/it has been sacking
we have been sacking
you have been sacking
they have been sacking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been sacking
you will have been sacking
he/she/it will have been sacking
we will have been sacking
you will have been sacking
they will have been sacking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been sacking
you had been sacking
he/she/it had been sacking
we had been sacking
you had been sacking
they had been sacking
Conditional
I would sack
you would sack
he/she/it would sack
we would sack
you would sack
they would sack
Past Conditional
I would have sacked
you would have sacked
he/she/it would have sacked
we would have sacked
you would have sacked
they would have sacked

sack

The tackle of a quarterback before he can pass the ball.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sack - a bag made of paper or plastic for holding customer's purchasessack - a bag made of paper or plastic for holding customer's purchases
bag - a flexible container with a single opening; "he stuffed his laundry into a large bag"
doggie bag, doggy bag - a bag for food that a customer did not eat at a restaurant; the transparent pretense is that the food is taken home to feed the customer's dog
grocery bag - a sack for holding customer's groceries
2.sack - an enclosed spacesack - an enclosed space; "the trapped miners found a pocket of air"
enclosed space, cavity - space that is surrounded by something
3.sack - the quantity contained in a sack
containerful - the quantity that a container will hold
4.sack - any of various light dry strong white wine from Spain and Canary Islands (including sherry)
white wine - pale yellowish wine made from white grapes or red grapes with skins removed before fermentation
5.sack - a woman's full loose hiplength jacketsack - a woman's full loose hiplength jacket
jacket - a short coat
6.sack - a hanging bed of canvas or rope netting (usually suspended between two trees); swings easily
bed - a piece of furniture that provides a place to sleep; "he sat on the edge of the bed"; "the room had only a bed and chair"
7.sack - a loose-fitting dress hanging straight from the shoulders without a waist
dress, frock - a one-piece garment for a woman; has skirt and bodice
8.sack - the plundering of a place by an army or mob; usually involves destruction and slaughter; "the sack of Rome"
pillaging, plundering, pillage - the act of stealing valuable things from a place; "the plundering of the Parthenon"; "his plundering of the great authors"
9.sack - the termination of someone's employment (leaving them free to depart)
superannuation - the act of discharging someone because of age (especially to cause someone to retire from service on a pension)
ending, termination, conclusion - the act of ending something; "the termination of the agreement"
conge, congee - an abrupt and unceremonious dismissal
removal - dismissal from office
deactivation, inactivation - breaking up a military unit (by transfers or discharges)
honorable discharge - a discharge from the armed forces with a commendable record
dishonorable discharge - a discharge from the armed forces for a grave offense (as sabotage or espionage or cowardice or murder)
Section Eight - a discharge from the US Army based on unfitness or character traits deemed undesirable
Verb1.sack - plunder (a town) after capture; "the barbarians sacked Rome"
take - take by force; "Hitler took the Baltic Republics"; "The army took the fort on the hill"
2.sack - terminate the employment of; discharge from an office or position; "The boss fired his secretary today"; "The company terminated 25% of its workers"
retire - make (someone) retire; "The director was retired after the scandal"
pension off - let go from employment with an attractive pension; "The director was pensioned off when he got senile"
clean out - force out; "The new boss cleaned out the lazy workers"
furlough, lay off - dismiss, usually for economic reasons; "She was laid off together with hundreds of other workers when the company downsized"
squeeze out - force out; "Some employees were squeezed out by the recent budget cuts"
remove - remove from a position or an office
send away, send packing, dismiss, drop - stop associating with; "They dropped her after she had a child out of wedlock"
3.sack - make as a net profit; "The company cleared $1 million"
earn, realise, pull in, bring in, realize, gain, make, take in, clear - earn on some commercial or business transaction; earn as salary or wages; "How much do you make a month in your new job?"; "She earns a lot in her new job"; "this merger brought in lots of money"; "He clears $5,000 each month"
benefit, profit, gain - derive a benefit from; "She profited from his vast experience"
net, clear - yield as a net profit; "This sale netted me $1 million"
4.sack - put in a sack; "The grocer sacked the onions"
encase, incase, case - enclose in, or as if in, a case; "my feet were encased in mud"
net, sack up, sack, clear - make as a net profit; "The company cleared $1 million"

sack

1
noun
1. bag, pocket, poke (Scot.), sac, pouch, receptacle A sack of potatoes.
2. dismissal, discharge, the boot (slang), the axe (informal), the chop (Brit. slang), the push (slang), the (old) heave-ho (informal), termination of employment, the order of the boot (slang) People who make mistakes can be given the sack the same day.
verb
1. (Informal) dismiss, fire (informal), axe (informal), discharge, kick out (informal), give (someone) the boot (slang), give (someone) his marching orders, kiss off (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), give (someone) the push (informal), give (someone) the bullet (Brit. slang), give (someone) his books (informal), give (someone) the elbow, give (someone) his cards, give someone his or her P45 (informal) He was sacked for slapping a schoolboy.
hit the sack (Slang) go to bed, retire, turn in (informal), bed down, hit the hay (slang) I hit the sack early.

sack

2
verb
1. plunder, loot, pillage, destroy, strip, rob, raid, ruin, devastate, spoil, rifle, demolish, ravage, lay waste, despoil, maraud, depredate (rare) Imperial troops sacked the French ambassador's residence in Rome.

sack 1

noun
Slang. The act of dismissing or the condition of being dismissed from employment:
Informal: ax.
Slang: boot, bounce.
verb
Slang. To end the employment or service of:
Informal: ax, fire, pink-slip.
Slang: boot, bounce, can.
Idioms: give someone his or her walking papers, give someone the ax, give someone the gate, give someone the pink slip, let go, show someone the door.

sack 2

verb
To rob of goods by force, especially in time of war:
Archaic: harrow, spoil.
Translations
sak
чувал
pytelvyhazovvyhoditvyhodit z práce
fyresækfyring
antaa potkutsäkkipotkutryöstääryöstö
otkazotpustitivreća
zsák
pokireka úr starfi
大袋解雇首にする
부대부대에 담다해고
atlaist no darbamaiss
vrece
vrečavrečivreči iz službe
säcksparkenavskeda
ไล่ออกกระสอบปลดออกจากงาน
çuvalişten atmaişten atmakişten çıkarmak/atmaktorba
bao tảisa thảisự sa thải

sack

1 [sæk]
A. N
1. (= bag)
1.1. (Brit) (for coal, grain) → saco m
a sack of potatoesun saco de patatas
to look like a sack of potatoesparecer un saco de patatas
1.2. (US) (for shopping) → bolsa f de papel
2. (from job) to get the sackser despedido
he got the sacklo despidieron
to give sb the sackdespedir or echar a algn
3. (esp US) (= bed) the sackla cama, el sobre
to hit the sackecharse a dormir
B. VT
1. (= put into sacks) → ensacar, meter en sacos
2. (= dismiss) → despedir
he was sackedlo despidieron
to be sacked for doing sthser despedido por hacer algo
C. CPD sack dress Nvestido m tipo saco
sack race Ncarrera f de sacos

sack

2 [sæk] (liter)
A. N (= plundering) → saqueo m
B. VT (= lay waste) → saquear

sack

[ˈsæk]
n
(= bag) → sac m
a sack of potatoes → un sac de pommes de terre
to give sb the sack → renvoyer qn, mettre qn à la porte
to get the sack → être renvoyé(e), être mis(e) à la porte
vt
(= dismiss) → renvoyer, mettre à la porte
He was sacked → On l'a mis à la porte.
(= plunder) → piller, mettre à sac

sack

:
sack race
n (as contest) → Sackhüpfen nt
sack racing
nSackhüpfen nt

sack

1
n
Sack m; 2 sacks of coal2 Säcke or Sack Kohlen; to buy something by the sacketw sackweise or in Säcken kaufen; like a sack of potatoes (fig)wie ein Mehlsack
(inf: = dismissal) → Entlassung f, → Rausschmiss m (inf); to get the sackrausgeschmissen werden (inf), → rausfliegen (inf); to give somebody the sackjdn rausschmeißen (inf); it’s the sack for himer wird rausgeschmissen (inf), → er fliegt raus (inf)
(inf: = bed) to hit the sacksich in die Falle or Klappe hauen (sl)
vt
(= put in sacks)einsacken
(inf: = dismiss) → rausschmeißen (inf), → entlassen

sack

2
n (= pillage)Plünderung f
vtplündern

sack

3
n (old)Sherry m

sack

1 [sæk]
1. n
a. (bag) → sacco
coal sack → sacco per il carbone
sack of coal → sacco di carbone
b. (fam) to get the sackessere licenziato/a
to give sb the sack → licenziare qn
c. (esp Am) (fam) (bed) → letto
2. vt (fam) (dismiss) → licenziare

sack

2 [sæk]
1. n (plundering) → saccheggio
the sack of Rome → il sacco di Roma
2. vt (plunder) → saccheggiare

sack1

(sӕk) noun
a large bag of coarse cloth, strong paper or plastic. The potatoes were put into sacks.
ˈsacking noun
a type of coarse cloth for making sacks.
ˈsackcloth noun
a type of coarse cloth formerly worn as a sign of mourning or of sorrow for sin.

sack2

(sӕk) verb
to dismiss (a person) from his job. One of the workmen was sacked for drunkenness.
get the sack
to be sacked. I'll get the sack if I arrive at the office late!

sack

جُوَالِق, صَرْف, يَصْرِفُ مِنَ الـخِدْمَة pytel, vyhazov, vyhodit z práce fyre, fyring, sæk entlassen, Entlassung, Sack απόλυση, διώχνω, σακί despido, echar del trabajo, saco antaa potkut, potkut, säkki renvoi, renvoyer, sac otkaz, otpustiti, vreća licenziamento, licenziare, sacco 大袋, 解雇, 首にする 부대, 부대에 담다, 해고 ontslaan, ontslag, zak gi sparken, oppsigelse, sekk worek, zwolnić, zwolnienie demissão, demitir, saco мешок, увольнение, увольнять avskeda, säck, sparken ไล่ออก, กระสอบ, ปลดออกจากงาน çuval, işten atma, işten atmak bao tải, sa thải, sự sa thải 开除, 解雇, 麻袋