sacked


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sack 1

 (săk)
n.
1.
a. A bag, especially one made of strong material for holding grain or objects in bulk.
b. The amount that a sack can hold: sold two sacks of rice.
2. also sacque A short loose-fitting garment for women and children.
3. Slang Dismissal from employment: finally got the sack after a year of ineptitude.
4. Informal A bed, mattress, or sleeping bag: hit the sack at 10:00.
5. Baseball A base.
6. Football A successful attempt at sacking the quarterback.
tr.v. sacked, sack·ing, sacks
1. To place into a sack: sacked the groceries.
2. Slang To discharge from employment: sacked the workers who were caught embezzling. See Synonyms at dismiss.
3. Football To tackle (a quarterback attempting to pass the ball) behind the line of scrimmage.
Phrasal Verb:
sack out Slang
To sleep.

[Middle English, from Old English sacc, from Latin saccus, from Greek sakkos, of Semitic origin; see śqq in Semitic roots.]
Word History: The ordinary word sack carries within it a few thousand years of commercial history. The Greeks got their word sakkos, "a bag made out of coarse cloth or hair," from the Phoenicians with whom they traded. The Phoenician word does not happen to be attested in any Phoenician writings that survive from antiquity, but words related to it can be found in the other Semitic languages, such as Hebrew śaq and Akkadian saqqu. The Greeks then passed the sack, as it were, to the Romans as Latin saccus, "a large bag or sack." The Latin word was then transmitted to the Germanic tribes with whom the Romans traded, and they gave it the form *sakkiz. (Similarly, many other languages of Europe, including Irish, Welsh, Albanian, Hungarian, Czech, Polish, and Russian, also have words derived from Greek sakkos or Latin saccus.) The speakers of Old English used two forms of the word, sæcc, meaning "sackcloth" and descending from Germanic *sakkiz, as well as sacc, meaning "a sack, a bag" and borrowed directly from Latin. The second Old English form is the ancestor of our sack.

sack 2

 (săk)
tr.v. sacked, sack·ing, sacks
To rob (a town, for example) of goods or valuables, especially after capture.
n.
The looting or pillaging of a captured city or town.

[Probably from French (mettre à) sac, (to put in) a sack, from Old French sac, sack, from Latin saccus, sack, bag; see sack1.]

sack 3

 (săk)
n.
Any of various light, dry, strong wines from Spain and the Canary Islands, imported to England in the 1500s and 1600s.

[From French (vin) sec, dry (wine), from Old French, from Latin siccus, dry.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.sacked - having been robbed and destroyed by force and violence; "the raped countryside"
destroyed - spoiled or ruined or demolished; "war left many cities destroyed"; "Alzheimer's is responsible for her destroyed mind"
References in classic literature ?
Petersburg and the neighboring villages was dissected, plank by plank, and its foundations dug up and ran- sacked for hidden treasure -- and not by boys, but men -- pretty grave, unromantic men, too, some of them.
The Lord above knows what the compromising consequences would be to numbers of people, if some of our documents were seized or destroyed; and they might be, at any time, you know, for who can say that Paris is not set afire to-day, or sacked to-morrow
It was as if the tranquil sanctuary of my boyhood had been sacked before my face, and its peace and honour given to the winds.
Dost thou think that I, who have seen a town sacked, in which thousands of my Christian countrymen perished by sword, by flood, and by fire, will blench from my purpose for the outcries or screams of one single wretched Jew?
Right over the town is the ruin of Whitby Abbey, which was sacked by the Danes, and which is the scene of part of "Marmion," where the girl was built up in the wall.
Tell me, O Muse, of that ingenious hero who travelled far and wide after he had sacked the famous town of Troy.
We went to Thebe the strong city of Eetion, sacked it, and brought hither the spoil.
cried the abbe; "why, for less than half, I would have half Paris sacked.
The money advanced had already been sacked and spent, and must be lost and the recruits left behind, unless they could be freed from their debts and engagements.
The marksman is getting sacked,' mused the onlooker, diagnosing the situation.
Bucket say, but sits with most attentive eyes until the sacked depository of noble secrets is brought down-- Where are all those secrets now?
They say--do these hoary traditions--that when Titus sacked Jerusalem and slaughtered eleven hundred thousand Jews in her streets and by-ways, the Wandering Jew was seen always in the thickest of the fight, and that when battle-axes gleamed in the air, he bowed his head beneath them; when swords flashed their deadly lightnings, he sprang in their way; he bared his breast to whizzing javelins, to hissing arrows, to any and to every weapon that promised death and forgetfulness, and rest.