Sacks


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sack 1

 (săk)
n.
1.
a. A bag, especially one made of strong material for holding grain or objects in bulk.
b. The amount that a sack can hold: sold two sacks of rice.
2. also sacque A short loose-fitting garment for women and children.
3. Slang Dismissal from employment: finally got the sack after a year of ineptitude.
4. Informal A bed, mattress, or sleeping bag: hit the sack at 10:00.
5. Baseball A base.
6. Football A successful attempt at sacking the quarterback.
tr.v. sacked, sack·ing, sacks
1. To place into a sack: sacked the groceries.
2. Slang To discharge from employment: sacked the workers who were caught embezzling. See Synonyms at dismiss.
3. Football To tackle (a quarterback attempting to pass the ball) behind the line of scrimmage.
Phrasal Verb:
sack out Slang
To sleep.

[Middle English, from Old English sacc, from Latin saccus, from Greek sakkos, of Semitic origin; see śqq in Semitic roots.]
Word History: The ordinary word sack carries within it a few thousand years of commercial history. The Greeks got their word sakkos, "a bag made out of coarse cloth or hair," from the Phoenicians with whom they traded. The Phoenician word does not happen to be attested in any Phoenician writings that survive from antiquity, but words related to it can be found in the other Semitic languages, such as Hebrew śaq and Akkadian saqqu. The Greeks then passed the sack, as it were, to the Romans as Latin saccus, "a large bag or sack." The Latin word was then transmitted to the Germanic tribes with whom the Romans traded, and they gave it the form *sakkiz. (Similarly, many other languages of Europe, including Irish, Welsh, Albanian, Hungarian, Czech, Polish, and Russian, also have words derived from Greek sakkos or Latin saccus.) The speakers of Old English used two forms of the word, sæcc, meaning "sackcloth" and descending from Germanic *sakkiz, as well as sacc, meaning "a sack, a bag" and borrowed directly from Latin. The second Old English form is the ancestor of our sack.

sack 2

 (săk)
tr.v. sacked, sack·ing, sacks
To rob (a town, for example) of goods or valuables, especially after capture.
n.
The looting or pillaging of a captured city or town.

[Probably from French (mettre à) sac, (to put in) a sack, from Old French sac, sack, from Latin saccus, sack, bag; see sack1.]

sack 3

 (săk)
n.
Any of various light, dry, strong wines from Spain and the Canary Islands, imported to England in the 1500s and 1600s.

[From French (vin) sec, dry (wine), from Old French, from Latin siccus, dry.]

Sacks

(sæks)
n
(Biography) Jonathan (Henry). Baron. born 1948, British rabbi; Commonwealth chief rabbi (1991–2013)
References in classic literature ?
I'm going to do two things: first, weigh my sack; and second, bet it that after you-all have lifted clean from the floor all the sacks of flour you-all are able, I'll put on two more sacks and lift the whole caboodle clean.
He turned to look and behold, there in the darkness stood two big black shadows, wrapped from head to foot in black sacks.
On this mighty tide the black ships--laden with the fresh-scented fir-planks, with rounded sacks of oil-bearing seed, or with the dark glitter of coal--are borne along to the town of St.
She looked suspiciously at the sack and wondered where everybody was?
13) as analysed by Proclus was very similar to Vergil's version in "Aeneid" ii, comprising the episodes of the wooden horse, of Laocoon, of Sinon, the return of the Achaeans from Tenedos, the actual Sack of Troy, the division of spoils and the burning of the city.
But whilst they were getting all ready, they heard the trampling of a horse at a distance, which so frightened them that they pushed their prisoner neck and shoulders together into a sack, and swung him up by a cord to the tree, where they left him dangling, and ran away.
On the bed, at full length, and faintly illuminated by the pale light that came from the window, lay a sack of canvas, and under its rude folds was stretched a long and stiffened form; it was Faria's last winding-sheet, -- a winding-sheet which, as the turnkey said, cost so little.
He sat nigh the Sheriff at meat, and he ran beside his horse when he went a-hunting; so that, what with hunting and hawking a little, and eating rich dishes and drinking good sack, and sleeping until late hours in the morning, he grew as fat as a stall-fed ox.
So when the day approached he put on his invisible belt, took a sack of gold pieces with him, and slipping into her room in the middle of the night, he placed the bag of gold beside her bed and returned to his sheep.
I spit and made a face and took on, to scare him, but he just looked like he was smarter'n me and put 'em back in his sack and walked off.
Her mother first perceived the alteration in the shape of Molly; and in order to hide it from her neighbours, she foolishly clothed her in that sack which Sophia had sent her; though, indeed, that young lady had little apprehension that the poor woman would have been weak enough to let any of her daughters wear it in that form.
I took the sack of corn meal and took it to where the canoe was hid, and shoved the vines and branches apart and put it in; then I done the same with the side of bacon; then the whisky-jug.