Sacks


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sack 1

 (săk)
n.
1.
a. A bag, especially one made of strong material for holding grain or objects in bulk.
b. The amount that a sack can hold: sold two sacks of rice.
2. also sacque A short loose-fitting garment for women and children.
3. Slang Dismissal from employment: finally got the sack after a year of ineptitude.
4. Informal A bed, mattress, or sleeping bag: hit the sack at 10:00.
5. Baseball A base.
6. Football A successful attempt at sacking the quarterback.
tr.v. sacked, sack·ing, sacks
1. To place into a sack: sacked the groceries.
2. Slang To discharge from employment: sacked the workers who were caught embezzling. See Synonyms at dismiss.
3. Football To tackle (a quarterback attempting to pass the ball) behind the line of scrimmage.
Phrasal Verb:
sack out Slang
To sleep.

[Middle English, from Old English sacc, from Latin saccus, from Greek sakkos, of Semitic origin; see śqq in Semitic roots.]
Word History: The ordinary word sack carries within it a few thousand years of commercial history. The Greeks got their word sakkos, "a bag made out of coarse cloth or hair," from the Phoenicians with whom they traded. The Phoenician word does not happen to be attested in any Phoenician writings that survive from antiquity, but words related to it can be found in the other Semitic languages, such as Hebrew śaq and Akkadian saqqu. The Greeks then passed the sack, as it were, to the Romans as Latin saccus, "a large bag or sack." The Latin word was then transmitted to the Germanic tribes with whom the Romans traded, and they gave it the form *sakkiz. (Similarly, many other languages of Europe, including Irish, Welsh, Albanian, Hungarian, Czech, Polish, and Russian, also have words derived from Greek sakkos or Latin saccus.) The speakers of Old English used two forms of the word, sæcc, meaning "sackcloth" and descending from Germanic *sakkiz, as well as sacc, meaning "a sack, a bag" and borrowed directly from Latin. The second Old English form is the ancestor of our sack.

sack 2

 (săk)
tr.v. sacked, sack·ing, sacks
To rob (a town, for example) of goods or valuables, especially after capture.
n.
The looting or pillaging of a captured city or town.

[Probably from French (mettre à) sac, (to put in) a sack, from Old French sac, sack, from Latin saccus, sack, bag; see sack1.]

sack 3

 (săk)
n.
Any of various light, dry, strong wines from Spain and the Canary Islands, imported to England in the 1500s and 1600s.

[From French (vin) sec, dry (wine), from Old French, from Latin siccus, dry.]

Sacks

(sæks)
n
(Biography) Jonathan (Henry). Baron. born 1948, British rabbi; Commonwealth chief rabbi (1991–2013)
References in classic literature ?
They have filled some flour sacks with clean dry moss from the woods, and put half a dozen blankets on the top, and they hope you can get along until the messenger who starts to-night for La Grange can bring some bedding over.
The men would tie up their feet in newspapers and old sacks, and these would be soaked in blood and frozen, and then soaked again, and so on, until by nighttime a man would be walking on great lumps the size of the feet of an elephant.
Being myself one of the laziest of mortals, I had altogether too much fellow-feeling for the lazy; and when poor, shiftless dogs put stones at the bottom of their cotton-baskets to make them weigh heavier, or filled their sacks with dirt, with cotton at the top, it seemed so exactly like what I should do if I were they, I couldn't and wouldn't have them flogged for it.
They had formerly been worked as savages always work mines -- holes grubbed in the earth and the mineral brought up in sacks of hide by hand, at the rate of a ton a day; but I had begun to put the mining on a scientific basis as early as I could.
I blacked my face en laid hid in de cellar of a ole house dat's burnt down, daytimes, en robbed de sugar hogsheads en grain sacks on de wharf, nights, to git somethin' to eat, en never dast to try to buy noth'n', en I's 'mos' starved.
He disappeared, and presently returned with the wagon, put the two small sacks into it, threw some old rags on top of them, and started off, dragging his cargo behind him.
Hodges would be cross sometimes, and as long as so many sacks were sold, it did not signify who ate the remainder.
The 'rahm' was a kind of lumber-hole smelling strong of malt and grain; various sacks of which articles were piled around, leaving a wide, bare space in the middle.
He had cut through a bulkhead unobserved and had removed one of the sacks of coin, worth perhaps three or four hundred guineas, to help him on his further wanderings.
I have often beheld two of those sages almost sinking under the weight of their packs, like pedlars among us, who, when they met in the street, would lay down their loads, open their sacks, and hold conversation for an hour together; then put up their implements, help each other to resume their burdens, and take their leave.
Some of the drivers were lying asleep on a pile of sacks.
I soon learnt that the object of our expedition was to fill our sacks with cocoanuts, but when at length I saw the trees and noted their immense height and the slippery smoothness of their slender trunks, I did not at all understand how we were to do it.