sacramental

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sac·ra·men·tal

 (săk′rə-mĕn′tl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or used in a sacrament.
2. Consecrated or bound by or as if by a sacrament: a sacramental duty.
3. Having the force or efficacy of a sacrament.
n.
A rite, act, or sacred object used by some Christian churches in worship.

sac′ra·men′tal·ly adv.

sacramental

(ˌsækrəˈmɛntəl)
adj
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) of, relating to, or having the nature of a sacrament
2. bound by or as if by a sacrament
n
(Roman Catholic Church) RC Church a sacrament-like ritual action, such as the sign of the cross or the use of holy water
ˌsacraˈmentally adv
sacramentality, ˌsacraˈmentalness n

sac•ra•men•tal

(ˌsæk rəˈmɛn tl)

adj.
1. of, pertaining to, or of the nature of a sacrament, esp. the sacrament of the Eucharist.
2. powerfully binding: a sacramental obligation.
n.
3. a sacred act, ceremony, or object instituted by the Church, as prayer, a blessing, or holy water.
[1350–1400; < Late Latin sacrāmentālis. See sacrament]
sac`ra•men′tal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.sacramental - of or relating to or involving a sacrament
Translations
أسْراري
svátostný
sakramental
szentségi
sakramentis-
sviatostný
Asâi Ruhbanî Ayinine ait

sacramental

[ˌsækrəˈmentl] ADJsacramental

sacramental

adj vows, rites, significancesakramental; sacramental wineOpferwein m

sacrament

(ˈsӕkrəmənt) noun
in the Christian church, a ceremony regarded as especially sacred, eg marriage, or baptism.
ˌsacraˈmental (-ˈmen-) adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
We should note that sections of the Summa theologiae with their openings to wider salvation--the generosity of God's grace, the different ways of Jesus Christ's relationship to people throughout history, implicit faith, the desire for what baptism sacramentalizes, and the universality of each individual's psychological response to God's call--would be written in the following five or more years leading up to the beginning of 1272.
Baldessari's justification for obliterating the faces of those who looked like "bank presidents opening a bank"--he "hated" them (5)--is, most obviously, a dubious usurpation of authority from the literary to the visual text, from the originary to the secondary; Baldessari's trademark would appear to be wholly interchangeable with any literary text, as opposed to the illustrations of Hogarth and Leslie, which move toward a transparency whereby the objective (and secondary) representation sacramentalizes the text, reaffirming rather than ignoring its real presence.
Among its many meanings, celibacy sacramentalizes the principle that you can't make a living at religion .