sacrilege


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

sac·ri·lege

 (săk′rə-lĭj)
n.
Desecration, profanation, misuse, or theft of something regarded as sacred.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin sacrilegium, from sacrilegus, one who steals sacred things : sacer, sacred; see sacred + legere, to gather; see leg- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

sac′ri·le′gist (săk′rə-lē′jĭst) n.

sacrilege

(ˈsækrɪlɪdʒ)
n
1. the misuse or desecration of anything regarded as sacred or as worthy of extreme respect: to play Mozart's music on a kazoo is sacrilege.
2. the act or an instance of taking anything sacred for secular use
[C13: from Old French sacrilège, from Latin sacrilegium, from sacrilegus temple-robber, from sacra sacred things + legere to take]
sacrilegist n

sac•ri•lege

(ˈsæc rə lɪdʒ)

n.
1. the violation or profanation of anything sacred or held sacred.
2. an instance of this.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Old French < Latin sacrilegium=sacri-, comb. form of sacrum sacred object or place + leg(ere) to steal, literally, gather + -ium -ium1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sacrilege - blasphemous behaviorsacrilege - blasphemous behavior; the act of depriving something of its sacred character; "desecration of the Holy Sabbath"
irreverence, violation - a disrespectful act

sacrilege

noun
1. desecration, violation, blasphemy, mockery, heresy, irreverence, profanity, impiety, profanation, profaneness Stealing from a place of worship was considered a sacrilege.
desecration respect, reverence, piety

sacrilege

noun
An act of disrespect or impiety toward something regarded as sacred:
Translations
تَدْنيس المُقَدَّسات
svatokrádež
helligbrøde
helgispjöll, vanhelgun
šventvagiškaišventvagystė
svētuma apgānīšanazaimizaimošana
kutsal şeylere saygısızlık

sacrilege

[ˈsækrɪlɪdʒ] N (lit, fig) → sacrilegio m

sacrilege

[ˈsækrɪlɪdʒ] n
(= offence to religion) → sacrilège m
(= offensive act) → sacrilège m

sacrilege

nSakrileg nt; (fig also)Frevel m; that would be sacrilegedas wäre ein Sakrileg or Frevel

sacrilege

[ˈsækrɪlɪdʒ] nsacrilegio

sacrilege

(ˈsӕkrəlidʒ) noun
the act of using a holy thing or place in a wicked way. Robbing a church is considered (a) sacrilege.
ˈsacriˈlegious (-ˈlidʒəs) adjective
ˌsacriˈlegiously adverb
ˌsacriˈlegiousness noun
References in classic literature ?
A louder voice just then, would have seemed a sacrilege.
Dost thou not know that it is sacrilege to touch an Isanusi?
A burning torch lay on the ground near the first man whom the mule had thrown, by the light of which Don Quixote perceived him, and coming up to him he presented the point of the lance to his face, calling on him to yield himself prisoner, or else he would kill him; to which the prostrate man replied, "I am prisoner enough as it is; I cannot stir, for one of my legs is broken: I entreat you, if you be a Christian gentleman, not to kill me, which will be committing grave sacrilege, for I am a licentiate and I hold first orders.
The priests took their places in front of the judge, and the clerk proceeded to read in a loud voice a complaint of sacrilege against Phileas Fogg and his servant, who were accused of having violated a place held consecrated by the Brahmin religion.
It is sacrilege to struggle against so many things, my Lord.
Do you believe it was because I committed the sacrilege of mounting en croupe behind Henry IV.
It certainly was little less than sacrilege," replied Grandfather; "but the time was coming when even the churches, where hallowed pastors had long preached the word of God, were to be torn down or desecrated by the British troops.
There was an appearance of sacrilege, in her eyes, in the act of appropriating these things to herself.
Now, even though I commit a sacrilege, I must speak to you.
It was sacrilege unspeakable against the holy cow The state desired his blood, but he had retreated into his hut, barricaded the doors and windows with big stones, and defied the world.
They had seen sacrilege unspeakable, and it behoved them to get away before the Gods and devils of the hills took vengeance.
His head was covered with a peruke, so daintily powdered and adjusted that it would have been sacrilege to disorder it with a hat; which, therefore (and it was a gold-laced hat, set off with a snowy feather), he carried beneath his arm.