saddle


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Related to saddle: saddle up, Back in the Saddle
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saddle
top: English saddle
bottom: western saddle
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saddle

sad·dle

 (săd′l)
n.
1.
a. A leather seat for a rider, secured on an animal's back by a girth. Also called regionally rig.
b. Similar tack used for attaching a pack to an animal.
c. The padded part of a driving harness fitting over a horse's back.
d. The seat of a bicycle, motorcycle, or similar vehicle.
e. Something shaped like a saddle.
2.
a. A cut of meat consisting of part of the backbone and both loins.
b. The lower part of a male fowl's back.
3.
a. A saddle-shaped depression in the ridge of a hill.
b. A ridge between two peaks.
4. See cricket4.
v. sad·dled, sad·dling, sad·dles
v.tr.
1. To put a saddle onto.
2. To load or burden; encumber: They were saddled with heavy expenses.
v.intr.
1. To saddle a horse.
2. To get into a saddle; mount a horse. Often used with up.
Idiom:
in the saddle
1. Prevailing or in control; dominant: "The crisis [in Russia] came to a head when the American-backed reformers were in the saddle" (Michael R. Gordon).
2. Engaged in an activity, especially a job: back in the saddle after a leave of absence from work.

[Middle English sadel, from Old English sadol; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

saddle

(ˈsædəl)
n
1. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) a seat for a rider, usually made of leather, placed on a horse's back and secured with a girth under the belly
2. a similar seat on a bicycle, tractor, etc, made of leather or steel
3. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) a back pad forming part of the harness of a packhorse
4. anything that resembles a saddle in shape, position, or function
5. (Cookery) a cut of meat, esp mutton, consisting of part of the backbone and both loins
6. (Zoology) the part of a horse or similar animal on which a saddle is placed
7. (Zoology) the part of the back of a domestic chicken that is nearest to the tail
8. (Civil Engineering) civil engineering a block on top of one of the towers of a suspension bridge that acts as a bearing surface over which the cables or chains pass
9. (General Engineering) engineering the carriage that slides on the bed of a lathe and supports the slide rest, tool post, or turret
10. (Zoology) the nontechnical name for clitellum
11. (Geological Science) another name for col1
12. (Building) a raised piece of wood or metal for covering a doorsill
13. in the saddle in a position of control
vb
14. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) (sometimes foll by up) to put a saddle on (a horse)
15. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) (intr) to mount into the saddle
16. (tr) to burden; charge: I didn't ask to be saddled with this job.
[Old English sadol, sædel; related to Old Norse sothull, Old High German satul]
ˈsaddleless adj
ˈsaddle-ˌlike adj

sad•dle

(ˈsæd l)

n., v. -dled, -dling. n.
1. a seat for a rider on the back of a horse or other animal.
2. a similar seat on a bicycle, tractor, etc.
3. a part of a harness laid across the back of an animal and girded under the belly, to which the terrets and checkhook are attached.
4. something resembling a saddle in shape, position, or function.
5. the part of the back of an animal where a saddle is placed.
6. a cut of lamb, venison, etc., comprising both loins.
7. the posterior part of the back of poultry.
8. a ridge connecting two higher elevations.
9. a strip of leather, often of a contrasting color, sewn across the instep of a shoe.
v.t.
11. to put a saddle on.
12. to load or charge, as with a burden or responsibility: saddled with unwanted guests.
v.i.
13. to put a saddle on a horse (often fol. by up).
14. to mount into the saddle (often fol. by up).
Idioms:
in the saddle,
a. in a position to direct or control; in command.
b. at work; on the job.
[before 900; (n.) Middle English sadel, Old English sadol; c. Old High German satal (German Sattel), Old Norse sǫthull; (v.) Middle English sad(e)len, Old English sadolian, derivative of the n.]
sad′dle•less, adj.
sad′dle•like`, adj.

saddle

  • apishamore - A blanket used under a saddle.
  • col - A saddle between two mountain peaks, from Latin collum, "neck."
  • caparison - A cloth or covering spread over the saddle or harness of a horse, often ornamented; this word can also mean "housings, trappings."
  • larigos - The rings on a saddle through which the straps pass.

saddle


Past participle: saddled
Gerund: saddling

Imperative
saddle
saddle
Present
I saddle
you saddle
he/she/it saddles
we saddle
you saddle
they saddle
Preterite
I saddled
you saddled
he/she/it saddled
we saddled
you saddled
they saddled
Present Continuous
I am saddling
you are saddling
he/she/it is saddling
we are saddling
you are saddling
they are saddling
Present Perfect
I have saddled
you have saddled
he/she/it has saddled
we have saddled
you have saddled
they have saddled
Past Continuous
I was saddling
you were saddling
he/she/it was saddling
we were saddling
you were saddling
they were saddling
Past Perfect
I had saddled
you had saddled
he/she/it had saddled
we had saddled
you had saddled
they had saddled
Future
I will saddle
you will saddle
he/she/it will saddle
we will saddle
you will saddle
they will saddle
Future Perfect
I will have saddled
you will have saddled
he/she/it will have saddled
we will have saddled
you will have saddled
they will have saddled
Future Continuous
I will be saddling
you will be saddling
he/she/it will be saddling
we will be saddling
you will be saddling
they will be saddling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been saddling
you have been saddling
he/she/it has been saddling
we have been saddling
you have been saddling
they have been saddling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been saddling
you will have been saddling
he/she/it will have been saddling
we will have been saddling
you will have been saddling
they will have been saddling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been saddling
you had been saddling
he/she/it had been saddling
we had been saddling
you had been saddling
they had been saddling
Conditional
I would saddle
you would saddle
he/she/it would saddle
we would saddle
you would saddle
they would saddle
Past Conditional
I would have saddled
you would have saddled
he/she/it would have saddled
we would have saddled
you would have saddled
they would have saddled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.saddle - a seat for the rider of a horse or camelsaddle - a seat for the rider of a horse or camel
cantle - the back of a saddle seat
English cavalry saddle, English saddle - a saddle having a steel cantle and pommel and no horn
packsaddle - a saddle for pack animals to which loads can be attached
saddlebow, pommel - handgrip formed by the raised front part of a saddle
seat - any support where you can sit (especially the part of a chair or bench etc. on which you sit); "he dusted off the seat before sitting down"
sidesaddle - a saddle for a woman; rider sits with both feet on the same side of the horse
stirrup, stirrup iron - support consisting of metal loops into which rider's feet go
stock saddle, Western saddle - an ornamented saddle used by cowboys; has a high horn to hold the lariat
2.saddle - a pass or ridge that slopes gently between two peaks (is shaped like a saddle)saddle - a pass or ridge that slopes gently between two peaks (is shaped like a saddle)
mountain pass, notch, pass - the location in a range of mountains of a geological formation that is lower than the surrounding peaks; "we got through the pass before it started to snow"
3.saddle - cut of meat (especially mutton or lamb) consisting of part of the backbone and both loins
cut of meat, cut - a piece of meat that has been cut from an animal carcass
4.saddle - a piece of leather across the instep of a shoe
piece of leather - a separate part consisting of leather
shoe - footwear shaped to fit the foot (below the ankle) with a flexible upper of leather or plastic and a sole and heel of heavier material
5.saddle - a seat for the rider of a bicyclesaddle - a seat for the rider of a bicycle  
bicycle, bike, cycle, wheel - a wheeled vehicle that has two wheels and is moved by foot pedals
seat - any support where you can sit (especially the part of a chair or bench etc. on which you sit); "he dusted off the seat before sitting down"
6.saddle - posterior part of the back of a domestic fowl
domestic fowl, fowl, poultry - a domesticated gallinaceous bird thought to be descended from the red jungle fowl
body part - any part of an organism such as an organ or extremity
back, dorsum - the posterior part of a human (or animal) body from the neck to the end of the spine; "his back was nicely tanned"
Verb1.saddle - put a saddle on; "saddle the horses"
attach - cause to be attached
offsaddle, unsaddle - remove the saddle from; "They unsaddled their mounts"
2.saddle - load or burden; encumber; "he saddled me with that heavy responsibility"
burden, burthen, weight, weight down - weight down with a load
3.saddle - impose a task upon, assign a responsibility to; "He charged her with cleaning up all the files over the weekend"
overburden - burden with too much work or responsibility
bear down - exert a force or cause a strain upon; "This tax bears down on the lower middle class"
flood out, overwhelm, deluge - charge someone with too many tasks
command, require - make someone do something
adjure - command solemnly

saddle

verb burden, load, lumber (Brit. informal), charge, tax, task, encumber The war saddled the country with huge foreign debt.

saddle

verb
1. To place a burden or heavy load on:
2. To force (another) to accept a burden:
Informal: stick.
Translations
سَرْجيُسْرِج
sedloosedlat
sadelsadle
satulasatuloidakuormittaakynnyslautanousta
sedlo
felnyergelnyereg
hnakkur, söîullleggja hnakk á, söîla
サドル
안장
balnasbalnotipabalnoti
apseglotsegliseglot
osedlatisedežsedlo
sadel
อาน
eyereyerlemeksemer
yên

saddle

[ˈsædl]
A. N
1. [of bicycle] → silla f; [of horse] → silla f de montar
Red Rum won with Stack in the saddleganó Red Rum montado por Stack
to be in the saddle (fig) → estar en el poder
2. (Culin) saddle of lambcuarto m (trasero) de cordero
3. [of hill] → collado m
B. VT
1. (also saddle up) [+ horse] → ensillar
2. (= lumber) to saddle sb with sthcargar a algn con algo
now we're saddled with itahora tenemos que cargar con ello
to get saddled with sthtener que cargar con algo
to saddle o.s. with sthcargar con algo

saddle

[ˈsædəl]
n [horse] → selle f
to be in the saddle (lit) (= riding a horse) → être en selle (fig) (= in control) → être aux commandes
vt
[+ horse] → seller
to be saddled with sth (= landed with) → avoir qch sur les bras

saddle

n (also of hill) → Sattel m; (of meat)Rücken m; to be in the saddle (lit)im Sattel sein; (fig)im Sattel sitzen
vt
horsesatteln
(inf) to saddle somebody/oneself with somebody/somethingjdm/sich jdn/etw aufhalsen (inf); to saddle somebody/oneself with responsibilitiesjdm/sich Verantwortung aufbürden; to saddle somebody/oneself with doubtsjdn/sich mit Zweifeln belasten; to be/have been saddled with somebody/somethingjdn/etw auf dem Hals or am Hals haben (inf); how did I get saddled with him?wie kommt es (nur), dass ich ihn am Hals habe?

saddle

:
saddle-backed
adj hillsattelförmig; pig, gullmit sattelförmiger Markierung am Rücken
saddlebag
nSatteltasche f
saddlecloth
nSatteldecke f
saddle horse
nReitpferd nt

saddle

:
saddle shoes
pl (US) Sportschuhe aus hellem Leder mit andersfarbigen Einsatz
saddle soap
n Seife für die Behandlung von Sätteln
saddle sore
saddle-sore
adj personwund geritten; to get saddlesich wund reiten

saddle

[ˈsædl]
1. n (of horse, also) (Culin) → sella; (of bicycle) → sellino, sella
in the saddle → in sella
when he was in the saddle (fig) → quando aveva le redini (del potere)
saddle of lamb → sella d'agnello
2. vt (horse) (also saddle up) → sellare
to saddle sb with sth (fam) (task, bill, name) → appioppare qc a qn (responsibility) → accollare qc a qn
I got saddled with him again → me lo sono dovuto sorbire di nuovo

saddle

(ˈsӕdl) noun
a seat for a rider. The bicycle saddle is too high.
verb
(negative unsaddle) to put a saddle on. He saddled his horse and rode away.

saddle

سَرْج sedlo sadel Sattel σέλα silla de montar satula selle sedlo sella サドル 안장 zadel sal siodło sela седло sadel อาน semer yên 马鞍
References in classic literature ?
Out in our garden is an apple tree that has a nice low branch, so Jo put the saddle on it, fixed some reins on the part that turns up, and we bounce away on Ellen Tree whenever we like.
It is no use to try to get back to camp to- night," said Tom, when the last of the pack and saddle animals had been corralled.
Then Ma'ame Pelagie rose with stately deliberation and went to saddle her horse, for she had yet to make her last daily round through the fields; and Mam'selle Pauline threaded her way slowly among the tangled grasses toward the cabin.
The simple admirer of the war-horse instantly fell back to a low, gaunt, switch-tailed mare, that was unconsciously gleaning the faded herbage of the camp nigh by; where, leaning with one elbow on the blanket that concealed an apology for a saddle, he became a spectator of the departure, while a foal was quietly making its morning repast, on the opposite side of the same animal.
Jessie, who had probably already learned from her sister the purport of Dick's confidences, had received him with equal cordiality and perhaps a more unqualified amusement; and now, when fairly lifted into the saddle by his tremulous but respectful hands, made a very charming picture of youthful and rosy satisfaction.
As yet the panic of the steed had given his unskilful rider an apparent advantage in the chase, but just as he had got half way through the hollow, the girths of the saddle gave way, and he felt it slipping from under him.
For now, since by many prolonged, repeated experiences, I have perceived that in all cases man must eventually lower, or at least shift, his conceit of attainable felicity; not placing it anywhere in the intellect or the fancy; but in the wife, the heart, the bed, the table, the saddle, the fire-side, the country; now that I have perceived all this, I am ready to squeeze case eternally.
It means to teach a horse to wear a saddle and bridle, and to carry on his back a man, woman or child; to go just the way they wish, and to go quietly.
On pretence of adjusting the saddle, he adroitly slipped under it the sharp little nut, in such a manner that the least weight brought upon the saddle would annoy the nervous sensibilities of the animal, without leaving any perceptible graze or wound.
Then Sir Agwisance the King of Ireland encountered with Sir Gareth, and there Sir Gareth smote him from his horse, saddle and all.
I have spent my life under his saddle - with him in it, too, and he is good for two hundred pounds, without his clothes; and there is no telling how much he does weigh when he is out on the war-path and has his batteries belted on.
On the 9th of April he sold the saddle--said he wasn't going to risk HIS life with any perishable saddle-girth that ever was made, over a rainy, miry April road, while he could ride bareback and know and feel he was safe--always HAD despised to ride on a saddle, anyway.