sadness


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sad

 (săd)
adj. sad·der, sad·dest
1. Showing, expressing, or feeling sorrow or unhappiness: a sad face.
2. Causing sorrow or gloom; depressing: a sad movie; sad news.
3. Deplorable or inadequate; sorry: a sad state of affairs; a sad excuse.
4. Dark-hued; somber.

[Middle English, weary, sorrowful, from Old English sæd, sated, weary; see sā- in Indo-European roots.]

sad′ly adv.
sad′ness n.
Synonyms: sad, melancholy, sorrowful, doleful, woebegone, desolate
These adjectives mean affected with or marked by unhappiness, as that caused by affliction. Sad is the most general: "Better by far you should forget and smile / Than that you should remember and be sad" (Christina Rossetti).
Melancholy can refer to lingering or habitual somberness or sadness: a melancholy poet's gloomy introspection. Sorrowful applies to emotional pain as that resulting from loss: sorrowful mourners at the funeral. Doleful describes what is mournful or morose: the doleful expression of a reprimanded child. Woebegone suggests grief or wretchedness, especially as reflected in a person's appearance: "His sorrow ... made him look ... haggard and ... woebegone" (George du Maurier).
Desolate applies to one that is beyond consolation: "Now she was desolate, a widow in a foreign country" (Nigel Hamilton).

SAD

abbr.
seasonal affective disorder

Sadness

 

See Also: DEJECTION, EMOTIONS, GLOOM

  1. As full of sorrow as the sea of sands —William Shakespeare
  2. Could feel it [the sadness] pierce him like a foreign body in his heart —Amos Oz
  3. Crest-fallen as a dried pear —William Shakespeare
  4. Crest-fallen as a spy who had been caught by a thief —Victor Hugo
  5. Depressing as the last day of fishing —Robert Traver
  6. A feeling of sadness that is not akin to pain, resembles sorrow only as the mist resembles rain —Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  7. (Scarlett) felt bereft, as though she had sold one of her children —Margaret Mitchell

    The sadness which inspired the comparison was that experienced by the heroine of Gone With the Wind when she sold her lumber business.

  8. Felt melancholy grip him, like a pain in the heart —Mary McCarthy
  9. (I felt depressed,) filled to the neck with sadness like a carafe with bad wine —T. Coraghessan Boyle
  10. His heart throbbed like a bruise in the sigh —Norman Mailer
  11. His heart would sink down to his bowels like lead —Thomas Wolfe
  12. Looked and acted like a man who had just driven home from a couple of heart-rending funerals —George Ade

    See Also: FACIAL EXPRESSIONS, SERIOUS

  13. Melancholy as a discarded statesman —William Mountford
  14. Melancholy as a fiddle with one string —Thomas Holcroft
  15. My heart is within me as an ash in the fire —Algernon Charles Swinburne
  16. My heart was as lead —Jack London
  17. Pathetic as all final efforts —Alice McDermott
  18. Pathetic as an autumn leaf —George Moore
  19. (A low call,) plaintive as a shepherd calling, to sheep who need no strident invocation —Arthur A. Cohen
  20. Sad as an eagle without wings, sad as a violin with only one string —Jean Rhys
  21. Sad as night —William Shakespeare
  22. Sad as professional mourners —F. Scott Fitzgerald
  23. Sad as twilight —George Eliot
  24. Saddening as a forest fire —Robert Traver
  25. Sad like graveyards —Terry Bisson
  26. Sad … like somebody who’s pilot light got blown out a long time ago —Susan Kelly
  27. Sadness … gnawed like a rat at his mind —Roderic Jeffries
  28. Sadness, like that inspired by a grave strain of music —Joseph Conrad
  29. Sadness that, over the years, had gathered in his chest like matter in a clogged drain —Joyce Reiser Kornblatt
  30. There would come, like water washing over a sunken buoy, the little knell of sadness —Hortense Calisher

Just as similes are used to give dramatic beginning to literary works, they can also be used to wind things up, as demonstrated by this final sentence from Calisher’s novel, Point of Departure.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sadness - emotions experienced when not in a state of well-beingsadness - emotions experienced when not in a state of well-being
feeling - the experiencing of affective and emotional states; "she had a feeling of euphoria"; "he had terrible feelings of guilt"; "I disliked him and the feeling was mutual"
dolefulness - sadness caused by grief or affliction
heaviness - persisting sadness; "nothing lifted the heaviness of her heart after her loss"
melancholy - a feeling of thoughtful sadness
misery - a feeling of intense unhappiness; "she was exhausted by her misery and grief"
forlornness, loneliness, desolation - sadness resulting from being forsaken or abandoned
tearfulness, weepiness - sadness expressed by weeping
sorrow - an emotion of great sadness associated with loss or bereavement; "he tried to express his sorrow at her loss"
regret, ruefulness, sorrow, rue - sadness associated with some wrong done or some disappointment; "he drank to drown his sorrows"; "he wrote a note expressing his regret"; "to his rue, the error cost him the game"
cheerlessness, uncheerfulness - a feeling of dreary or pessimistic sadness
depression - sad feelings of gloom and inadequacy
dejectedness, dispiritedness, downheartedness, low-spiritedness, lowness - a feeling of low spirits; "he felt responsible for her lowness of spirits"
happiness - emotions experienced when in a state of well-being
2.sadness - the state of being sad; "she tired of his perpetual sadness"
unhappiness - state characterized by emotions ranging from mild discontentment to deep grief
bereavement, mourning - state of sorrow over the death or departure of a loved one
poignance, poignancy - a state of deeply felt distress or sorrow; "a moment of extraordinary poignancy"
3.sadness - the quality of excessive mournfulness and uncheerfulness
uncheerfulness - not conducive to cheer or good spirits

sadness

sadness

noun
Translations
smutek
sorg
dapurleiki
smutektristeza
žalost
hüzünüzgünlüküzücü

sadness

[ˈsædnɪs] Ntristeza f

sadness

[ˈsædnɪs] ntristesse f

sadness

nTraurigkeit f; our sadness at his deathunsere Trauer über seinen Tod

sadness

[ˈsædnɪs] ntristezza

sad

(sӕd) adjective
unhappy or causing unhappiness. She's sad because her son is ill; a sad face.
ˈsadness noun
ˈsadden verb
to make or become sad. She was saddened by her son's ingratitude.
ˈsadly adverb
He stared sadly at the ruins of his house.

sadness

n. tristeza, melancolía.

sadness

n tristeza
References in classic literature ?
My brothers, although they support me not, Are angry if I speak of my sadness.
The poet says that "a feeling of sadness comes o'er him.
The sadness was in the heart of George Willard and was without mean- ing, but it appealed to Enoch Robinson.
Overcome by sadness, nervously agitated, deeply distressed at having been so long separated from her lover, disturbed at the sight of the emotion she had divined, she accordingly presented herself to the king with an embarrassed aspect, which in his then disposition of mind the king interpreted unfavorably.
For think, in all thy sadness, What road our griefs may take; Whose brain reflect our madness, Or whom our terrors shake.
Thus spake the disciple; and all the others then thronged around Zarathustra, grasped him by the hands, and tried to persuade him to leave his bed and his sadness, and return unto them.
Again, it is indignation, hurt of outrage, despair and sadness.
And it is a sadness as deep-reaching as the roots of the race.
The sadness of the incomplete--the sadness that is often Life, but should never be Art--throbbed in its disjected phrases, and made the nerves of the audience throb.
how well I know all the sadness and all the mockery that is contained in those three words.
The middle one of the three windows was half-way open; and sitting close beside it, taking the air with an infinite sadness of mien, like some disconsolate prisoner, Utterson saw Dr.
On Hetty's blooming health it would take a great deal of such mental suffering as hers to leave any deep impress; and when she was dressed as neatly as usual in her working-dress, with her hair tucked up under her little cap, an indifferent observer would have been more struck with the young roundness of her cheek and neck and the darkness of her eyes and eyelashes than with any signs of sadness about her.