sagacious


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sa·ga·cious

 (sə-gā′shəs)
adj.
Having or showing keen discernment, sound judgment, and farsightedness. See Synonyms at shrewd.

[From Latin sagāx, sagāc-, of keen perception; see sāg- in Indo-European roots.]

sa·ga′cious·ly adv.
sa·ga′cious·ness n.

sagacious

(səˈɡeɪʃəs)
adj
1. having or showing sagacity; wise
2. (Hunting) obsolete (of hounds) having an acute sense of smell
[C17: from Latin sagāx, from sāgīre to be astute]
saˈgaciously adv
saˈgaciousness n

sa•ga•cious

(səˈgeɪ ʃəs)

adj.
1. having or showing acute mental discernment and keen practical sense; shrewd: a sagacious lawyer.
2. Obs. keen of scent.
[1600–10; < Latin sagāx keen-scented, acute, discerning; see -acious]
sa•ga′cious•ly, adv.
sa•ga′cious•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.sagacious - acutely insightful and wise; "much too perspicacious to be taken in by such a spurious argument"; "observant and thoughtful, he was given to asking sagacious questions"; "a source of valuable insights and sapient advice to educators"
wise - having or prompted by wisdom or discernment; "a wise leader"; "a wise and perceptive comment"
2.sagacious - skillful in statecraft or management; "an astute and sagacious statesman"
politic - marked by artful prudence, expedience, and shrewdness; "it is neither polite nor politic to get into other people's quarrels"; "a politic decision"; "a politic manager"; "a politic old scoundrel"; "a shrewd and politic reply"

sagacious

sagacious

adjective
1. Possessing or showing sound judgment and keen perception:
2. Possessing, proceeding from, or exhibiting good judgment and prudence:
Translations
ثاقِب الفِكْر
prozíravý
forstandig
vitur, kænn
gudrsprātīgssaprātīgs

sagacious

[səˈgeɪʃəs] ADJ (frm) [person, remark] → sagaz

sagacious

[səˈgeɪʃəs] adj (= wise) → sage

sagacious

adj, sagaciously
advweise, klug

sagacious

[səˈgeɪʃəs] adjsagace

sagacious

(səˈgeiʃəs) adjective
showing intelligence, wisdom and good judgement. The old priest was learned and sagacious.
saˈgaciously adverb
sagacity (səˈgӕsəti) noun
References in classic literature ?
When they issued from beneath its concealment, they found the scout awaiting their appearance nigh by, and the only salutation between them was the significant gesture for silence, made by their sagacious leader.
Higginson's congratulatory eloquence, this appeared to be the one thing which Colonel Pyncheon, provident and sagacious as he was, had allowed to go at loose ends.
Dimmesdale so evidently was, to eat his unsavoury morsel always at another's board, and endure the life-long chill which must be his lot who seeks to warm himself only at another's fireside, it truly seemed that this sagacious, experienced, benevolent old physician, with his concord of paternal and reverential love for the young pastor, was the very man, of all mankind, to be constantly within reach of his voice.
I told him, too, that he being in other things such an extremely sensible and sagacious savage, it pained me, very badly pained me, to see him now so deplorably foolish about this ridiculous Ramadan of his.
The result of this lowering was somewhat illustrative of that sagacious saying in the Fishery, --the more whales the less fish.
Very soon you seemed to get used to me: I believe you felt the existence of sympathy between you and your grim and cross master, Jane; for it was astonishing to see how quickly a certain pleasant ease tranquillised your manner: snarl as I would, you showed no surprise, fear, annoyance, or displeasure at my moroseness; you watched me, and now and then smiled at me with a simple yet sagacious grace I cannot describe.
This new life of the Doctor's was an anxious life, no doubt; still, the sagacious Mr.
After reflecting about it, with a sagacious air, Mr.
Yet he would smoke his pipe at the Battery with a far more sagacious air than anywhere else - even with a learned air - as if he considered himself to be advancing immensely.
So sented the grim Feature, and upturn'd His Nostril wide into the murkie Air, Sagacious of his Quarrey from so farr.
Other attendants there were of a different description; two or three large and shaggy greyhounds, such as were then employed in hunting the stag and wolf; as many slow-hounds of a large bony breed, with thick necks, large beads, and long ears; and one or two of the smaller dogs, now called terriers, which waited with impatience the arrival of the supper; but, with the sagacious knowledge of physiognomy peculiar to their race, forbore to intrude upon the moody silence of their master, apprehensive probably of a small white truncheon which lay by Cedric's trencher, for the purpose of repelling the advances of his four-legged dependants.
Barton, the sagacious founder of the Western Electric, went to France and England to establish an export trade in telephones, and failed.