sagacity


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sa·gac·i·ty

 (sə-găs′ĭ-tē)
n.
The quality of being discerning, sound in judgment, and farsighted; wisdom.

[French sagacité, from Old French sagacite, from Latin sagācitās, quickness of perception, from sagāx, sagāc-, of keen perception; see sagacious.]

sagacity

(səˈɡæsɪtɪ)
n
foresight, discernment, or keen perception; ability to make good judgments

sa•gac•i•ty

(səˈgæs ɪ ti)

n.
the quality of being sagacious.
[1540–50; < Latin sagācitās keenness of scent, derivative of sagāc-, s. of sagāx (see sagacious)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sagacity - the mental ability to understand and discriminate between relations
eye - good discernment (either visually or as if visually); "she has an eye for fresh talent"; "he has an artist's eye"
common sense, good sense, gumption, horse sense, mother wit, sense - sound practical judgment; "Common sense is not so common"; "he hasn't got the sense God gave little green apples"; "fortunately she had the good sense to run away"
judiciousness - good judgment
circumspection, discreetness, discretion, prudence - knowing how to avoid embarrassment or distress; "the servants showed great tact and discretion"
indiscreetness, injudiciousness - lacking good judgment
sapience, wisdom - ability to apply knowledge or experience or understanding or common sense and insight
2.sagacity - the trait of forming opinions by distinguishing and evaluating
wisdom, wiseness - the trait of utilizing knowledge and experience with common sense and insight

sagacity

sagacity

noun
Translations
حِدَّة ذكاء
bystrost
forstandighed
eszesség
skynsemi, vit
akıllılık

sagacity

[səˈgæsɪtɪ] N (frm) → sagacidad f

sagacity

[səˈgæsəti] n (= wisdom) → sagesse f

sagacity

nWeisheit f, → Klugheit f

sagacity

[səˈgæsɪtɪ] nsagacia

sagacious

(səˈgeiʃəs) adjective
showing intelligence, wisdom and good judgement. The old priest was learned and sagacious.
saˈgaciously adverb
sagacity (səˈgӕsəti) noun
References in classic literature ?
The body is a big sagacity, a plurality with one sense, a war and a peace, a flock and a shepherd.
She had formed a very favourable opinion of my practical sagacity.
In so doing, we do not only consult our own dignity and ease, but the good and advantage of the reader: for besides that by these means we prevent him from throwing away his time, in reading without either pleasure or emolument, we give him, at all such seasons, an opportunity of employing that wonderful sagacity, of which he is master, by filling up these vacant spaces of time with his own conjectures; for which purpose we have taken care to qualify him in the preceding pages.
He had heard much of the sagacity of the beaver in cutting down trees, in which, it is said, they manage to make them fall into the water, and in such a position and direction as may be most favorable for conveyance to the desired point.
Vasili Andreevich screwed up his eyes, bent down his head, and looked out for the way-marks, but trusted mainly to the horse's sagacity, letting it take its own way.
Spies cannot be usefully employed without a certain intuitive sagacity.
But out of that chaos your belief in your own prudence and sagacity reasserts itself.
Already the difficulties of avoiding a collision in a crowd are enough to tax the sagacity of even a well-educated Square; but if no one could calculate the Regularity of a single figure in the company, all would be chaos and confusion, and the slightest panic would cause serious injuries, or -- if there happened to be any Women or Soldiers present -- perhaps considerable loss of life.
He applied himself to the work with great patience and sagacity, carefully acting the
So, thanks to his care, his intelligence, his useful intervention in all difficulties, his prodigious and humane sagacity, the average of accidents did not exceed that of transatlantic countries, noted for their excessive precautions-- France, for instance, among others, where they reckon about one accident for every two hundred thousand francs of work.
He slept in a stable--generally on horseback--and so terrified a Newfoundland dog by his preternatural sagacity, that he has been known, by the mere superiority of his genius, to walk off unmolested with the dog's dinner, from before his face.
I have here certain letters from Paris on which I would consult your young sagacity which is accredited to us by the most loyal Dona Rita.