sailing


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Related to sailing: Sailing boats

sail·ing

 (sā′lĭng)
n.
1. The skill required to operate and navigate a vessel; navigation.
2. The sport or pastime of operating or riding in a sailboat.
3. Departure or time of departure from a port.

sailing

(ˈseɪlɪŋ)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) the practice, art, or technique of sailing a vessel
2. (Nautical Terms) a method of navigating a vessel: rhumb-line sailing.
3. (Nautical Terms) an instance of a vessel's leaving a port: scheduled for a midnight sailing.

sail•ing

(ˈseɪ lɪŋ)

n.
1. the activity of one that sails.
2. any of various methods for determining courses and distances by means of charts or with reference to longitudes and latitudes, great circles, etc.

sailing

  • aloof - Comes from sailing, in which ships keep clear of coastal rocks by holding the vessel "luff"—"to the windward"; so, to hold "a-luff" means to "keep clear."
  • jibe - Meaning "be compatible, consistent," it may come from the earlier jibe, "to shift a sail from side to side while sailing in the wind."
  • plain sailing - Probably comes from plane sailing, a way of determining a ship's position based on its moving on a plane (flat surface).
  • aback - Originated in sailing, as a ship was taken aback when a strong gust of wind suddenly blew the sails back against the mast, causing the ship to stop momentarily.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sailing - the work of a sailorsailing - the work of a sailor      
leg - (nautical) the distance traveled by a sailing vessel on a single tack
cabotage - navigation in coastal waters
tacking, tack - (nautical) the act of changing tack
employment, work - the occupation for which you are paid; "he is looking for employment"; "a lot of people are out of work"
steerage, steering - the act of steering a ship
accommodation ladder - (nautical) a portable ladder hung over the side of a vessel to give access to small boats alongside
becket - (nautical) a short line with an eye at one end and a knot at the other; used to secure loose items on a ship
bilge well - (nautical) a well where seepage drains to be pumped away
bitter end - (nautical) the inboard end of a line or cable especially the end that is wound around a bitt
chip - a triangular wooden float attached to the end of a log line
deadeye - (nautical) a round hardwood disk with holes and a grooved perimeter used to tighten a shroud
escutcheon - (nautical) a plate on a ship's stern on which the name is inscribed
jack ladder, pilot ladder, Jacob's ladder - (nautical) a hanging ladder of ropes or chains supporting wooden or metal rungs or steps
laniard, lanyard - (nautical) a line used for extending or fastening rigging on ships
lead line, sounding line - (nautical) plumb line for determining depth
luff - (nautical) the forward edge of a fore-and-aft sail that is next to the mast
overhead - (nautical) the top surface of an enclosed space on a ship
ratlin, ratline - (nautical) a small horizontal rope between the shrouds of a sailing ship; they form a ladder for climbing aloft
rudder - (nautical) steering mechanism consisting of a hinged vertical plate mounted at the stern of a vessel
sea ladder, sea steps - (nautical) ladder to be lowered over a ship's side for coming aboard
mainsheet, weather sheet, shroud, tack, sheet - (nautical) a line (rope or chain) that regulates the angle at which a sail is set in relation to the wind
spun yarn - (nautical) small stuff consisting of a lightweight rope made of several rope yarns loosely wound together
stay - (nautical) brace consisting of a heavy rope or wire cable used as a support for a mast or spar
sternpost - (nautical) the principal upright timber at the stern of a vessel
fireroom, stokehold, stokehole - (nautical) chamber or compartment in which the furnaces of a ship are stoked or fired
towing line, towing rope, towline, towrope - (nautical) a rope used in towing
capsizing - (nautical) the event of a boat accidentally turning over in the water
beam-ends - (nautical) at the ends of the transverse deck beams of a vessel; "on her beam-ends" means heeled over on the side so that the deck is almost vertical
ship's bell, bell - (nautical) each of the eight half-hour units of nautical time signaled by strokes of a ship's bell; eight bells signals 4:00, 8:00, or 12:00 o'clock, either a.m. or p.m.
steerageway - (nautical) the minimum rate of motion needed for a vessel to be maneuvered
stand out - steer away from shore, of ships
starboard - turn to the right, of helms or rudders
fore - situated at or toward the bow of a vessel
rigged - fitted or equipped with necessary rigging (sails and shrouds and stays etc)
unrigged - stripped of rigging
close to the wind - nearly opposite to the direction from which wind is coming; "sailing close to the wind"
2.sailing - riding in a sailboat
water travel, seafaring - travel by water
luff - the act of sailing close to the wind
beat - the act of beating to windward; sailing as close as possible to the direction from which the wind is blowing
tack - sailing a zigzag course
spill - reduce the pressure of wind on (a sail)
3.sailing - the departure of a vessel from a port
departure, going, going away, leaving - the act of departing
4.sailing - the activity of flying a glidersailing - the activity of flying a glider  
flying, flight - an instance of traveling by air; "flying was still an exciting adventure for him"
hang gliding - gliding in a hang glider
paragliding, parasailing - gliding in a parasail
Translations
إِبْحَارإبْحار
plachtěníplavba
sejlads
purjehdus
jedrenje
sigling
航海
항해
plachtenie
jadranjeodhod ladje
segling
การเดินเรือ
yelken sporuyelkencilik
sự đi thuyền

sailing

[ˈseɪlɪŋ]
A. N
1. (Sport) → vela f, navegación f a vela
to go sailinghacer vela
to be plain sailing now it's all plain sailingahora es coser y cantar
it's not exactly plain sailingno es muy sencillo que digamos
2. (Naut) (= departure) → salida f
B. CPD sailing boat Nvelero m, barco m de vela
sailing date Nfecha f de salida (de un barco)
sailing orders NPLúltimas instrucciones fpl (dadas al capitán de un buque)
sailing ship Nvelero m, buque m de vela
sailing time Nhora f de salida (de un barco)

sailing

[ˈseɪlɪŋ]
n
(= sport, hobby) → voile f
His hobby is sailing → Son passe-temps, c'est la voile.
to go sailing → faire de la voile
plain sailing
It was not all plain sailing → Ça n'a pas toujours été facile.
(= departure of boat) → départ m
There are regular sailings from Portsmouth → Il y a des départs réguliers de Portsmouth.sailing boat n (British)voilier msailing dinghy nvoilier m, dériveur msailing ship ngrand voilier m

sailing

n
Segeln nt; (as sport) → Segeln nt, → Segelsport m
(= departure) when is the next sailing for Arran?wann fährt das nächste Schiff nach Arran? ? plain

sailing

:
sailing boat
n (Brit) → Segelboot nt
sailing date
sailing school
nSegelschule f
sailing ship
nSegelschiff nt
sailing time
nAbfahrtszeit f
sailing vessel
nSegelschiff nt
sailing yacht
nSegeljacht f

sailing

[ˈseɪlɪŋ] n (sport) → vela; (departure) → partenza
(pleasure) sailing → navigazione f da diporto
to go sailing → fare vela
now it's all plain sailing → il resto è liscio come l'olio

sail

(seil) noun
1. a sheet of strong cloth spread to catch the wind, by which a ship is driven forward.
2. a journey in a ship. a sail in his yacht; a week's sail to the island.
3. an arm of a windmill.
verb
1. (of a ship) to be moved by sails. The yacht sailed away.
2. to steer or navigate a ship or boat. He sailed (the boat) to the island.
3. to go in a ship or boat (with or without sails). I've never sailed through the Mediterranean.
4. to begin a voyage. The ship sails today; My aunt sailed today.
5. to travel on (the sea etc) in a ship. He sailed the North Sea.
6. to move steadily and easily. Clouds sailed across the sky; He sailed through his exams; She sailed into the room.
ˈsailboard noun
a windsurfer.
ˈsailing noun
the activity or sport of navigating a ship or boat that has sails. Sailing is one of his hobbies.
sailing-
having a sail or sails. sailing-boat.
ˈsailor noun
a member of a ship's crew whose job is helping to sail a ship.
in full sail
with all the sails spread. The ship was in full sail.

sailing

إِبْحَار plavba sejlads Segeln ιστιοπλοΐα navegación purjehdus voile jedrenje vela 航海 항해 afvaart seiling żeglarstwo navegação мореплавание segling การเดินเรือ yelken sporu sự đi thuyền 航行
References in classic literature ?
He and his men had had days of weary sailing and had sought in vain for shallow water in which they might come to an anchorage.
The curling and spotless mists, which had been seen sailing above the hills toward the north, were now returning in an interminable dusky sheet, that was urged along by the fury of a tempest.
Here, likewise -- the germ of the wrinkle-browed, grizzly-bearded, careworn merchant -- we have the smart young clerk, who gets the taste of traffic as a wolf-cub does of blood, and already sends adventures in his master's ships, when he had better be sailing mimic boats upon a mill-pond.
Alarmed at this terrible outburst between the two principal and responsible owners of the ship, and feeling half a mind to give up all idea of sailing in a vessel so questionably owned and temporarily commanded, I stepped aside from the door to give egress to Bildad, who, I made no doubt, was all eagerness to vanish from before the awakened wrath of Peleg.
Probably the mother during an important interval was sailing down the Peruvian coast, when earthquakes caused the beach to gape.
The shriek was followed by another, louder and yet more agonizing-- for once started upon that journey, the hog never came back; at the top of the wheel he was shunted off upon a trolley, and went sailing down the room.
He showed us the whole thing, on a relief-map, and we could see our route, with all its elevations and depressions, its villages and its rivers, as clearly as if we were sailing over it in a balloon.
And when you see one of them come sailing around with one wing tipped up and t'other down, you make up your mind he is saying to himself: 'I wish Mary Ann in Arkansaw could see me now.
Then there was a wild yelp of agony and the poodle went sailing up the aisle; the yelps continued, and so did the dog; he crossed the house in front of the altar; he flew down the other aisle; he crossed before the doors; he clamored up the home-stretch; his anguish grew with his progress, till presently he was but a woolly comet moving in its orbit with the gleam and the speed of light.
He was generally called Captain Anthony--a title which, I presume, he acquired by sailing a craft on the Chesapeake Bay.
The crows sailing overhead perhaps watched me while I took this survey.
Still at sea, poor fellow; further and further away from me; sailing through the day, sailing through the night.