sailmaker

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sailmaker

(ˈseɪlˌmeɪkə)
n
a person who makes sails
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sailmaker - a maker of sailssailmaker - a maker of sails      
maker, shaper - a person who makes things
Translations

sailmaker

[ˈseɪlˌmeɪkəʳ] Nvelero m

sailmaker

[ˈseɪlˌmeɪkəʳ] nvelaio
sailmaker's (shop) → veleria
References in classic literature ?
I knew once a Scotch sailmaker who was certain, dead sure, there were people in Mars.
The most expensive single residential property was a flat in Sailmakers Court, Fulham, which went for PS1.
UK Sailmakers NW will relocate their Anacortes service loft to 712 Coho Way, in the Marina Square building on Bellingham's waterfront later this month.
To put that in context - and with all those noughts you really do need a bit of context - so great was the volume of fabric required for the job by Floridian sailmakers Doyle Ploch that the order depleted the entire US supply and additional material had to be imported from Europe.
The Harland and Wolff shipyards are largely dormant now, a place where sailmakers, rope makers, shipwrights, boilermakers, riveters, steel pressers, painters and a host of long-lost tradesmen toiled building the might of the British Empire.
The prototype, fabricated in partnership with Doyle Sailmakers of Salem, Massachusetts, achieved several key milestones.
Long before engine-powered vessels came on the scene, the wind provided propulsion for boats and ships of all sizes, and sailmakers designed and stitched together fabrics to catch the wind.
She started working about 10 hours a week several years ago in the office of Squeteague Sailmakers in nearby Cataumet where Mrs.
When talking about sailmakers, you said: 'It's a dead profession.
Cook, his passengers and his crew, which included male sailmakers, noted the clothing styles they encountered, regional variations, the role of rank, colour and pattern in garments, and the differences between men and women's attire; this information was used principally to classify and enlarge the body of knowledge within their culture of origin, not necessarily to change the culture they encountered.
How many sailmakers, gunpowder workers, ironworkers, sugar refiners, carters, rope-makers, seamen and shipwrights, barrel-makers and coppersmiths, made their living from the trade in, and the labour of, enslaved African women, children and men?