sajou

sajou

(səˈdʒuː)
n
(Animals) a South American monkey
References in periodicals archive ?
Clashes were intensified between the Ankara-backed militants of Sultan Murad group with Ahrar al-Sham and al-Shamiyeh Front near the Sajou camp three kilometers North of Azaz.
Ginevra has a life-long love of crafting, colour and natural materials, and stocks a wide range of designer names such as Rowan, Debbie Bliss, Louisa Harding, Natural Dye Studio, Noro, as well as quilting fabrics by Amy Butler and Kaffe Fassett, and embroidery materials by DMC and Sajou.
Leo Sajou, she founded La Revue du Monde Noir [The Black World Review] (1931/32), which became the center of black cultural activity in Paris.
In the well-known ruling regarding Pichon and Sajous vs.
Para el gran publico, a partir de 1930 la ola negra cobra realidad con fuerza en los cafes, los cabares, las galerias: del "fenomeno Josephine Baker", quien baila el charleston en el Folies-Bergere, al descubrimiento del jazz, y en particular el de Duke Ellington, del Instituto negro de Paris fundado por Leo Sajous.
Kearse Doris, Romantic Crystal Starr Knighton Bernie Greenberg, Milt Gabler Barry Pearl Shirley Christina Sajous Stanley Greenberg, Murray Schwartz, Kingsman Brandon Uranowitz
1 percent of the stock and has a $602,000 claim on the property, and Dorothy Sajous of Andover, Mass.
Em uma das epigrafes do Edificio Brasilia, Rua Jose Bonifacio 209, le- se: PROJECTO E FISCALISACAO | SAJOUS | ARCHITECTO | D.
En 1930, Paulette Nardal, l'etudiante martiniquaise installee a Paris, avait lance avec l'aide du Dr Sajous, la Revue du Monde Noir, revue bilingue dans laquelle plusieurs Afro-Americains furent publies en anglais.
Later, Edwards contends that 1920s Paris was a major site of Black internationalism where "early Francophone Antillean and African intellectuals (such as Rene Maran, Kojo Tovalou, Louis Achille, Leo Sajous, and Leon-Gontran Damas) were equally mobile in the period, in Europe, Africa, and in some cases the United States as well" (Edwards 2003: 4).