salad


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Related to salad: Indian salad, Greek salad, fruit salad

sal·ad

 (săl′əd)
n.
1.
a. A dish of raw leafy green vegetables, often tossed with pieces of other raw or cooked vegetables, fruit, cheese, or other ingredients and served with a dressing.
b. The course of a meal consisting of this dish.
2. A cold dish of chopped vegetables, fruit, meat, fish, eggs, or other food, usually prepared with a dressing, such as mayonnaise.
3. A green vegetable or herb used in salad, especially lettuce.
4. A varied mixture: "The Declaration of Independence was ... a salad of illusions" (George Santayana).

[Middle English salade, from Old French, possibly from Old Provençal salada, from Vulgar Latin *salāta, from feminine past participle of *salāre, to salt, from Latin sāl, salt; see sal- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]
Word History: Salt was and is such an important ingredient in salad dressings that the very word salad is based on the Latin word for "salt." Vulgar Latin had a verb *salāre, "to salt," from Latin sāl, "salt," and the past participle form of this verb, *salāta, "having been salted," came to mean "salad." The Vulgar Latin word passed into languages descending from it, such as Portuguese (salada) and Old Provençal (salada). Old French may have borrowed its word salade from Old Provençal. Medieval Latin also carried on the Vulgar Latin word in the form salāta. As in the case of so many culinary delights, the English borrowed the word and probably the dish from the French. The Middle English word salade, from Old French salade and Medieval Latin salāta, is first recorded in a cookbook composed before 1399. · Salt is of course an important ingredient of other foods and condiments besides salad dressings, as is evidenced by some other culinary word histories. The words sauce and salsa, borrowed into English from French and Spanish, respectively, both come ultimately from the Latin word salsus, meaning "salted." Another derivative of this word was the Late Latin adjective salsīcius, "prepared by salting," which eventually gave us the word sausage.

salad

(ˈsæləd)
n
1. (Cookery) a dish of raw vegetables, such as lettuce, tomatoes, etc, served as a separate course with cold meat, eggs, etc, or as part of a main course
2. (Cookery) any dish of cold vegetables or fruit: potato salad; fruit salad.
3. (Cookery) any green vegetable used in such a dish, esp lettuce
[C15: from Old French salade, from Old Provençal salada, from salar to season with salt, from Latin sal salt]

sal•ad

(ˈsæl əd)

n.
1. a cold dish of raw vegetables, as lettuce, tomatoes, and cucumbers, served with a dressing, sometimes with meat, cheese, etc., added.
2. a dish of any of various raw or cold cooked foods, usu. sliced or chopped and mixed with mayonnaise or other dressing: potato salad; tuna salad; egg salad.
3. any herb or green vegetable eaten raw, as in salads.
4. a mixture or assortment.
[1350–1400; < Middle French salade < Vulgar Latin *salāta, derivative of salāre to salt]

salad

  • corn salad - A name given to several species of annual herbs sometimes used for salad.
  • fruit cocktail, fruit cup, fruit salad - Fruit cocktail (1922) is a mixture of sliced or diced fruits, and it is synonymous with fruit cup (1931); fruit salad (1861) is a salad composed of fruits.
  • salad days - Those when one is green in judgment, young and inexperienced.
  • salad - A shortened version of Latin herba salata, "salted vegetables," from Latin sal, "salt."

Salad

 a cold dish composed of a variety of fruits, vegetables, meats, etc.
Examples: salad of murder and Te Deums, of conflagration and general fasts, 1635; salad of styles (architectural), 1893; the Puritan, Anabaptists, Brownist, like a grand salad, 1635.

salad

lettuce
1. 'salad'

A salad is a mixture of cold or uncooked vegetables. You can eat it on its own or with other foods.

For lunch she had a salad of tomato, onion and cucumber.
I made some potato salad for the picnic.
2. 'lettuce'

A salad usually includes the large green leaves of a vegetable called a lettuce /'letɪs/. Don't refer to this vegetable as a 'salad'.

Tear the lettuce into small pieces and mix it with the dressing.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.salad - food mixtures either arranged on a plate or tossed and served with a moist dressingsalad - food mixtures either arranged on a plate or tossed and served with a moist dressing; usually consisting of or including greens
dish - a particular item of prepared food; "she prepared a special dish for dinner"
tossed salad - salad tossed with a dressing
salmagundi - cooked meats and eggs and vegetables usually arranged in rows around the plate and dressed with a salad dressing
salad nicoise - typically containing tomatoes and anchovies and garnished with black olives and capers
potato salad - any of various salads having chopped potatoes as the base
pasta salad - a salad having any of various pastas as the base
fruit salad - salad composed of fruits
crab Louis - lettuce and crabmeat dressed with sauce Louis
herring salad - based on pickled herring
tuna fish salad, tuna salad - salad composed primarily of chopped canned tuna fish
chicken salad - salad composed primarily of chopped chicken meat
coleslaw, slaw - basically shredded cabbage
molded salad - salad of meats or vegetables in gelatin
tabbouleh, tabooli - a finely chopped salad with tomatoes and parsley and mint and scallions and bulgur wheat
Translations
سَلاَطَةسَلَطَه
салата
salát
salat
salado
salaatti
salata
saláta
salat
サラダ
샐러드
mišrainėsalotossalotų užpilasvaisių asorti
salāti
šalát
solata
salataсалата
sallad
สลัด
xa-lát

salad

[ˈsæləd]
A. Nensalada f
fruit saladensalada f de frutas, macedonia f de frutas (Sp)
Russian saladensaladilla f (rusa), ensalada f rusa
B. CPD salad bowl Nensaladera f
salad cream N (Brit) → mayonesa f
salad days NPLjuventud fsing
salad dish Nensaladera f
salad dressing Naliño m
salad oil Naceite m para ensaladas

salad

[ˈsæləd] nsalade f
tomato salad → salade de tomates
green salad → salade vertesalad bar n (in restaurant, canteen)buffet m de cruditéssalad bowl nsaladier msalad cream n (British)sauce f mayonnaise (en bouteille)salad days nplannées fpl de jeunesse et d'inexpériencesalad dressing nvinaigrette fsalad oil nhuile f de tablesalad servers nplcouverts mpl à saladesalad shaker npanier m à saladesalad spinner nessoreuse f à salade

salad

nSalat m

salad

:
salad bar
nSalatbüffet nt
salad bowl
salad cream
n˜ Mayonnaise f, → ˜ Majonäse f
salad days
plunschuldige Jugendtage pl; in the salad of his youthals er noch jung und unschuldig war
salad dressing
nSalatsoße f; lettuce with saladangemachter Salat
salad oil
nSalatöl nt
salad spinner
n (Cook) → Salatschleuder f

salad

[ˈsæləd] ninsalata
tomato salad → insalata di pomodori
ham salad → prosciutto e insalata

salad

(ˈsӕləd) noun
(a dish of) mixed raw vegetables.
fruit salad
a mixture of chopped fruits usually eaten as a dessert.
salad cream
a type of mayonnaise usually sold in bottles.
salad dressing
a sauce for putting on salad, usually consisting of oil and vinegar and sometimes spices.

salad

سَلاَطَة salát salat Salat σαλάτα ensalada salaatti salade salata insalata サラダ 샐러드 salade salat sałatka salada салат sallad สลัด salata xa-lát 色拉

salad

n. ensalada.

salad

n ensalada
References in classic literature ?
The bread burned black, for the salad dressing so aggravated her that she could not make it fit to ear.
Certain I am, however, that a king's head is solemnly oiled at his coronation, even as a head of salad.
I think they must have been taken out at random, for I am sure I tasted aniseed water, anchovy sauce, and salad dressing.
At the back, there's a pig, and there are fowls and rabbits; then, I knock together my own little frame, you see, and grow cucumbers; and you'll judge at supper what sort of a salad I can raise.
But as he was still very hungry and this juicy salad tasted very good to his present nature, he went on eating with a still greater appetite.
Alderman Ptolemy Tortoise brought a salad with him in a string bag.
An olla of rather more beef than mutton, a salad on most nights, scraps on Saturdays, lentils on Fridays, and a pigeon or so extra on Sundays, made away with three-quarters of his income.
This, with some cheese and a salad and a bottle of old tokay, of which I had two glasses, was my supper.
he murmured, as he stepped into the oblong and grated vehicle which they call "the salad basket.
These two girls had been above an hour in the place, happily employed in visiting an opposite milliner, watching the sentinel on guard, and dressing a salad and cucumber.
The meal was a foreign one, of course; it consisted in two small but tasty dishes of meat prepared with skill and served with nicety; a salad and "fromage francais," completed it.
He set before his master a frugal, but perfectly Parisian repast: roast meat, cooked at the baker's, with vegetables, salad, and a dessert borrowed from the shop itself.