salmonella

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sal·mo·nel·la

 (săl′mə-nĕl′ə)
n. pl. sal·mo·nel·lae (-nĕl′ē) or sal·mo·nel·las or salmonella
1. Any of various rod-shaped bacteria of the genus Salmonella, especially S. enterica, which cause food poisoning, typhoid, and paratyphoid fever in humans and various infectious diseases in domestic animals. Salmonella bacteria are divided into numerous serotypes on the basis of certain antigens found in the cell wall and flagella.
2. Salmonellosis.

[New Latin Salmonella, genus name, after Daniel Elmer Salmon (1850-1914), American pathologist.]

salmonella

(ˌsælməˈnɛlə)
n, pl -lae (-ˌliː)
(Microbiology) any Gram-negative rod-shaped aerobic bacterium of the genus Salmonella, including S. typhosa, which causes typhoid fever, and many species (notably S. enteritidis) that cause food poisoning (salmonellosis): family Enterobacteriaceae
[C19: New Latin, named after Daniel E. Salmon (1850–1914), US veterinary surgeon]

sal•mo•nel•la

(ˌsæl məˈnɛl ə)

n., pl. -nel•lae (-ˈnɛl i) -nel•las.
1. any of several rod-shaped bacteria of the genus Salmonella that enter the digestive tract in contaminated food, causing food poisoning.
[< New Latin (1900), after Daniel E.Salmon(1850–1914), U.S. pathologist]

sal·mo·nel·la

(săl′mə-nĕl′ə)
A rod-shaped bacterium that causes food poisoning in humans.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.salmonella - rod-shaped Gram-negative enterobacteria; cause typhoid fever and food poisoning; can be used as a bioweapon
enteric bacteria, enterics, enterobacteria, entric - rod-shaped Gram-negative bacteria; most occur normally or pathogenically in intestines of humans and other animals
genus Salmonella - a genus of bacteria
Gartner's bacillus, Salmonella enteritidis - a form of salmonella that causes gastroenteritis in humans
Salmonella typhimurium - a form of salmonella that causes food poisoning in humans
Salmonella typhi, Salmonella typhosa, typhoid bacillus - a form of salmonella that causes typhoid fever
Translations
szalmonella

salmonella

[ˌsælməˈnelə] N (salmonellae (pl)) [ˌsælməˈneliː]salmonela f
salmonella food-poisoningsalmonelosis f

salmonella

[ˌsælməˈnɛlə] n
(= bacteria) → salmonelle f
(= poisoning) → salmonellose fsalmonella poisoning nsalmonellose fsalmon farm nélevage m de saumonssalmon fishing npêche f au saumonsalmon pink n & adjrose m inv saumonsalmon steak ndarne f de saumonsalmon trout ntruite f saumonée

salmonella

n (also salmonella poisoning)Salmonellenvergiftung f

salmonella

[ˌsælməˈnɛlə] nsalmonella

salmonella

n. Salmonela, género de bacterias gram-negativas de la familia Enterobacteriaceae que causan fiebres entéricas, otras infecciones gastrointestinales y septicemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Infection begins with the ingestion of contaminated food or water so that salmonellae reach the intestinal epithelium and trigger gastrointestinal disease.
Multiple antibiotic resistance among salmonellae in India.
Lab M's new Pinnacle"' Salmonella ABC pre-poured plates are designed for the isolation of Salmonellae from food samples and are based on Lab M's established HarlequinTM Salmonella ABC medium.
The majority of cases were in children and were typhoidal Salmonellae.
However, resistance to quinolones and cephalosporins has emerged among Salmonellae worldwide.
Raffatellu's team found, however, that salmonellae overcome this immune response by expressing specialized transporter proteins that enable the bacteria to acquire zinc in spite of calprotectin reducing the amount available in the digestive tract.
Effect of temperature and added polyphosphate on the survival of salmonellae in poultry meat during cold storage.
Although this work did not seek to investigate the culture of fresh versus frozen samples, little difference was seen between the two in the number of salmonellae isolated by culture (each gave three samples positive for Salmonella).
Peanuts can become contaminated with salmonellae during growth, harvest, or storage, and the organisms are able to survive high temperatures in a high-fat, low-water--activity environment (9).
Information from these meeting was used to prepare guidelines to help broiler plants control salmonellae (19).
Salmonellae are also among the most prevalent of zoonotic infectious agents throughout the world (Werner, 1992).