salsa


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sal·sa

 (säl′sə)
n.
1. A spicy sauce of chopped, usually uncooked vegetables or fruit, especially tomatoes, onions, and chili peppers, used as a condiment.
2.
a. A genre of Latin American music characterized by Afro-Caribbean rhythms, Cuban big-band arrangements, and elements of jazz and rock.
b. A dance for couples performed to this music.

[American Spanish, from Spanish, sauce, from Old Spanish, from Vulgar Latin *salsa; see sauce.]

salsa

(ˈsælsə)
n
1. (Music, other) a type of Latin American big-band dance music
2. (Music, other) a dance performed to this kind of music
3. (Cookery) Mexican cookery a spicy tomato-based sauce
[C20: from Spanish: sauce]

sal•sa

(ˈsɑl sə, -sɑ)

n., pl. -sas.
1. Latin American music blending Cuban rhythm with elements of jazz, rock, and soul.
2. a dance of Puerto Rican origin performed to this music.
3. a sauce, esp. a hot sauce containing chilies.
[1970–75; < American Spanish, Sp: sauce]

salsa

1. An American Spanish word meaning sauce, used to mean a spicy cooking sauce and also a type of Latin-American dance music.
2. A type of Latin American dance music that originated in the mid–1970s. It developed initially among the Hispanic community of New York City and its influences include the Latin American big band dance music of the 1940s as well as modern jazz, Afro-Caribbean rhythms, and rock music. The name is also used for the style of dancing to this music and is derived from a Spanish word for a hot sauce typically served with Mexican food.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.salsa - spicy sauce of tomatoes and onions and chili peppers to accompany Mexican foodssalsa - spicy sauce of tomatoes and onions and chili peppers to accompany Mexican foods
condiment - a preparation (a sauce or relish or spice) to enhance flavor or enjoyment; "mustard and ketchup are condiments"
Translations
salsasalsa mexicanasalsa picante
salsa

salsa

[ˈsælsə] n
(= sauce) → sauce f piquante à la tomate
(= music) → salsa f

salsa

n
(Mus) → Salsa m
(Cook) → Salsasoße f
References in periodicals archive ?
Reyes, Mario Mora (the co-DJ) and salsa dancer Stephen Eiring organized the event in an attempt to energize the local salsa scene.
Moving from the lyric to the clave, Zink Yi's salsa plays their oppositions in creative--and symptomatic--ways.
These were actually developed in Texas in the 1940s as an Americanized version of salsa.
Secrets of Salsa (ISBN 1-931498-202) is published by Chelsea Green Publishing Company and can be found in bookstores.
It may be cold outside, but things are really hotting up in Edinburgh where the Scottish heat of the Tropicana Tropics World Salsa Dance Championships 2002 takes place at the El Barrio club tomorrow.
To stand a chance of winning, send a postcard with your name and address to: Stephen Johnson, Salsa Competition, South Wales Echo, Thomson House, Havelock Street, Cardiff, CF1 10XR.
Elsewhere, she examines attitudes that have marginalized the salsa movement by emphasizing its working-class roots, the role of dancing, and how men and women express themselves within that social context, and includes discussions of such controversial figures as singers La Lupe and Willie Colon.
This Chicago-native got her first exposure to salsa at home.
Hay salsa cachengue, salsa caliente pa' apretarte, salsa que te quiero mia pa' saborearte, salsa que te extrano y por eso te bailo, salsa que sin querer ensalsaste a Houston, que te mira, te profundiza y hasta a duras penas te baila.
That has changed the orientation of Corfuerte, which now sells more of its salsa verde, salsa roja, salsa borracha and other sauces on the northern side of the border than south of it.
Barbara Kelly, owner of the Denver-based Made in Colorado shop, said, "I feel like we're the salsa capital of the world.
Coloque los huevos en un platon y pongalas encima la salsa y el queso.