salt of the earth


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salt

 (sôlt)
n.
1. A usually whitish crystalline solid, chiefly sodium chloride, used extensively in ground or granulated form as a food seasoning and preservative. Also called common salt, table salt.
2. An ionic chemical compound formed by replacing all or part of the hydrogen ions of an acid with metal ions or other cations.
3. salts Any of various mineral salts used as laxatives or cathartics.
4. salts Smelling salts.
5. often salts Epsom salts.
6. An element that gives flavor or zest.
7. Sharp lively wit.
8. Informal A sailor, especially when old or experienced.
9. A saltcellar.
adj.
1. Containing or filled with salt: a salt spray; salt tears.
2. Having a salty taste or smell: breathed the salt air.
3. Preserved in salt or a salt solution: salt mackerel.
4.
a. Flooded with seawater.
b. Found in or near such a flooded area: salt grasses.
tr.v. salt·ed, salt·ing, salts
1. To add, treat, season, or sprinkle with salt.
2. To cure or preserve by treating with salt or a salt solution.
3. To provide salt for (deer or cattle).
4. To add zest or liveliness to: salt a lecture with anecdotes.
5. To give an appearance of value to by fraudulent means, especially to place valuable minerals in (a mine) for the purpose of deceiving.
Phrasal Verbs:
salt away
To put aside; save.
salt out
To separate (a dissolved substance) by adding salt to the solution.
Idioms:
salt of the earth
1. A person or group considered as embodying simplicity and moral integrity.
2. Archaic A person or group considered the best or most worthy part of society.
worth (one's) salt
Efficient and capable.

[Middle English, from Old English sealt; see sal- in Indo-European roots.]

SALT

 (sôlt)
abbr.
Strategic Arms Limitation Talks

salt′ of the earth′


n.
an individual or group considered to embody the noblest human qualities.
[1350–1400; Middle English; after Matthew 5:13]
References in classic literature ?
Ratignolle was one of those men who are called the salt of the earth.
These are rare souls; they are the salt of the earth.
I use heaps of postage stamps, pay the expenses of many indifferent lecturers, defray the cost of printing reams of pamphlets and hand-bills which hail the laborer flatteringly as the salt of the earth, write and edit a little socialist journal, and do what lies in my power generally.
With innovation and quality as its driving principles, Salt of the Earth has been producing sustainable sea salt solutions for the global food industry since 1922.
Many consumers seek solutions that will allow them to dramatically reduce sodium in their diet on a daily basis, while keeping the great taste of their food," says Giorit Carmi, Marketing Manager of Salt of the Earth.
Jesus' message, on the other hand, goes out to people who have hope, people who have not turned their backs on God, people who have not lost their saltiness but instead are the salt of the earth.
If our Catholic periodicals, like the salt of the earth, lose their taste, then what can we be salted with?
The Church lives not only synchronically," Ratzinger wrote in Salt of the Earth.
I am a local lad and I am fond of the people of this area - they are the salt of the earth.
Because you're the salt of the earth and are always willing to shell out hard cash to aid a community in need.
But Elizabeth Fawcett, 75, who moved a year ago to work for a Christian body, said: "People here are the salt of the earth.
If the genre produced few pictures that stand up over time, it did allow for some gripping dramas, such as Lumet's Fail Safe, and some striking moments of refreshingly unabashed agitprop, such as Salt of the Earth, the banned 1954 union film calling on the workers of the New World to unite.